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#1
i've googled it but cant find anything.
so does anyone know where i can get titanium frets?
thanks,

mike .n
#2
Why would you want titanium? Stainless is rock hard.

Ti might not bend well enough to conform to the neck radius.

Probably very expensive, too. I've never heard of it being used.
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#3
ti would suck , it would be ultra heavy unless you got ti alloy, ti is never realyl used for anything because of its weight, ti alloy which most companys just refur to as ti is however used alot, but as frets it would be worthless , and they would be really hard to crown and dress and work on, not to mention that the cost of it you might as well whipe your ass with $20 bills
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i im gonna have to agree with t heff
#6
Obviously, just get stainless steel fretboard. You'll never need to clean it and the frets are built right in it! Seriously, just get stainless steel frets. A lot cheaper and probably last just as long.
#7
Quote by godofshred
if your really goin for indestructable frets, go diamond


you know you wanna

I don't think he wants to slice his strings every time he frets a note..
#8
Quote by Kanthras
I don't think he wants to slice his strings every time he frets a note..

i think he does
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#9
Titanium is really hard to work with... Its possible but the benefits arent that great. Its weight and strength are great but the weight change wouldnt be that much and it would cost less to do multiple stainless changes. Unless your building something like the Lockheed SR-71 Skylark (A cold war era spy plane made completely of Titanium) the benefits arent worth the price.
#10
Quote by powermetalg
Titanium is really hard to work with... Its possible but the benefits arent that great. Its weight and strength are great but the weight change wouldnt be that much and it would cost less to do multiple stainless changes. Unless your building something like the Lockheed SR-71 Skylark (A cold war era spy plane made completely of Titanium) the benefits arent worth the price.


How would you know how Ti works? Do you work with titanium on a regular basis and can therefore make a judgment?
#11
The Discovery channel has taught me that Titanium is 40% lighter then steel, but just as strong. Ti also has a low melting temp, so why would you put Ti frets on a guitar your going to shred so fast that temperatures will be in the thousands? Giggidy giggidy. Its also expensive. Although it doesnt corrode(neither does stainless), stainless steel is prolly ur best bet.
#12
From what I know Ti won't be very malleable compared to stainless. Being a nerd who has at one point worked with chainmailling, I know that titanium wire is quite a deal harder to work than stainless. So that would transform into pain in the ass trying to work Ti frets like a number of people have said.

I have a side question, does fret material have that much of an effect on tone? I've heard that stainless frets make the tone shrill and weak. I was wondering if anyone here could confirm or deny this from experience with steel frets.
#13
Quote by t heff
ti would suck , it would be ultra heavy unless you got ti alloy, ti is never realyl used for anything because of its weight, ti alloy which most companys just refur to as ti is however used alot, but as frets it would be worthless , and they would be really hard to crown and dress and work on, not to mention that the cost of it you might as well whipe your ass with $20 bills


titanium is lighter than steel and a lot stronger. it is like 4x more expensive though.. but how much metal are you really gonna use with frets? probably like 10-20 bucks worth at most. i don't think that shaping them would be any harder than shaping the steel ones.
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#15
hey thanks guy. so from what i've gathered ti frets would be a bad choice.
but i have heard of "ti strings or something.basically i'm looking for a set of strings that
are hard to break cause i do use my guitar a lot.
thanks,

mike .n
#16
its not that they're a bad choice just there is a reason no one has made titanium frets, they arent practical and stainless is already more than hard enough.

if your breaking strings lots change your string brand or smooth out the slots in your nut and string saddles.
#17
Quote by powermetalg
Lockheed SR-71 Skylark...

Dude, the plane is called a Blackbird. Skylark was the name of a specific Cuban overflight program.
#18
Yeah, it's the Blackbird, I've seen one. And honestly, there wouldn't be that much of an advantage over SS or even nickel. And it would be so much of a pain to work with it would cancel out any benefits, and would be extremely cost-prohibitive.
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#19
Wow, lots of flaming over the properties of titanium. You know, most of that knowledge is pretty readily available on the internet or books. You don't have to actually work titanium to know its properties.

Now then, I'm going to agree with everyone here, titanium frets would not be the way to go. There will be no appreciable weight loss, sustain will remain effectively unaffected, durability will not be greatly improved, and cost is through the roof. From an economic and logical standpoint it just doesn't make much sense to do that. Now, if you wanted to have an unique guitar, or use it on a very high quality, ultra-expensive guitar, then it could be somewhat justified.

I think this is a scenario where Mr. Ick would most definitely right, just say no.
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#20
Quote by Pikka Bird
Dude, the plane is called a Blackbird. Skylark was the name of a specific Cuban overflight program.


I knew it sounded a little weird... I was really into these planes about 3 years ago so Ive lost a little of the knowledge since then. I do remember that it was origionally supposed to be the RS-71 but the guy who unveiled the plane mixed it up so they just switched the #'s.
#21
Quote by powermetalg
I knew it sounded a little weird... I was really into these planes about 3 years ago so Ive lost a little of the knowledge since then. I do remember that it was origionally supposed to be the RS-71 but the guy who unveiled the plane mixed it up so they just switched the #'s.


He didn't mix them up, he just preferred it.
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#22
well, they dont make titanium frets, though, if they did they would be far superior to any steel fret, basically because they would be alot harder, and thus would do nice things, like transfer vibration into the neck better, and probably never pit or wear out.

thing is, they'd be really, really expencive, i mean, we're talking custom extruded fret wire, made out of expencive alloy, and they'd probably make you pay for the dye and the people who make them.

it would essentially be thousands of dollars, for one refret...

and stainless frets do pretty good anyway...
#23
Stainless would be fine dude. Titanium alloys are far more durable than steel though, anyone who tells you otherwise is full of BS up to their eyeballs. Ever hammered on the thread of a titanium bolt and a stainless bolt? You can bash the stainless, titanium is pretty much completely oblivious.

Anyway it would cost way too much because they'd have to machine each fret to it's specific size because Ti isn't really malleable enough to hammer into shape... And do you know how fast tooling Ti wears down drill bits, CNC machine bits, etc? (I'll give you a clue: it rhymes with qucking fuick).

You'll probably never have to replace the frets again using stainless anyway, unless this guitar is getting daily use and you have it for the next 25 years; by then maybe Ti will be available...
#24
t heff - Titanium is not heavy. It's lighter and stronger than steel.

dogismycopilot - Titanium does not have a low melting temperature, it's over 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit

And yeah, in theory Ti might give you slightly improved sustain and a brighter tone, and obviously better durability, but it's quite difficult to work with, so it's probably not worth the cost.

Something I think might sound interesting though, glass frets. I wonder if it's been done.
Last edited by Blaster Bob at Oct 21, 2007,
#25
Quote by Blaster Bob
Something I think might sound interesting though, glass frets. I wonder if it's been done.

Or perhaps ceramic frets? Hmm..
#26
Quote by mike .n
hey thanks guy. so from what i've gathered ti frets would be a bad choice.
but i have heard of "ti strings or something.basically i'm looking for a set of strings that
are hard to break cause i do use my guitar a lot.
thanks,

mike .n


Titanium or stainless steel frets would cause your strings to wear even faster. The stronger metal wears out the weaker one (which would be the strings in this case).
#27
Quote by t heff
ti would suck , it would be ultra heavy unless you got ti alloy, ti is never realyl used for anything because of its weight, ti alloy which most companys just refur to as ti is however used alot, but as frets it would be worthless , and they would be really hard to crown and dress and work on, not to mention that the cost of it you might as well whipe your ass with $20 bills


Titanium is used a **** load more than you seem to believe...

What's wrong with it's weight, it's lighter than a feather, metaphorically speaking.

You are correct, that a pain in the rear to work on though.
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#28
Quote by RGman
Titanium is used a **** load more than you seem to believe...

What's wrong with it's weight, it's lighter than a feather, metaphorically speaking.

You are correct, that a pain in the rear to work on though.

look at a periodical table , ti is really heavy, they mix it with aluminum usualy to make it lighter and they call it ti alloy. i never said that ti wasn't used alot, in fact my razor that i shave with is ti , and im working on a way to make replacement blades for my goalie skates (hockey) out of ti, so they wont chip and rust , but as far as guitars go, there isn't much use
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i im gonna have to agree with t heff
#29
Quote by Blaster Bob
t heff - Titanium is not heavy. It's lighter and stronger than steel.

dogismycopilot - Titanium does not have a low melting temperature, it's over 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit

And yeah, in theory Ti might give you slightly improved sustain and a brighter tone, and obviously better durability, but it's quite difficult to work with, so it's probably not worth the cost.

Something I think might sound interesting though, glass frets. I wonder if it's been done.

glass frets have been done, it was cool actualy , everything sounded like it was being played with a slide, it was some french company i think . and ti is heavy , i know everyone thinks its not but thats because they are using ti alloy and thinknig its ti when really its ti alloy and not ti, ti is really heavy, look at the periodical table if you dont belive me, or take a chem class
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i im gonna have to agree with t heff
#30
Quote by t heff
but as far as guitars go, there isn't much use


Titanium saddles. They sound amazing, apparently.
#31
Surprised to see that no one has mentioned that aluminum is stronger than steel...
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#32
^hm, didn't know that.

and i just wanted to say... i did a little school thing on titanium, and looked up buying prices for it from this one supplier. $100 a gram. no thank youuu...
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#33
Quote by t heff
glass frets have been done, it was cool actualy , everything sounded like it was being played with a slide, it was some french company i think . and ti is heavy , i know everyone thinks its not but thats because they are using ti alloy and thinknig its ti when really its ti alloy and not ti, ti is really heavy, look at the periodical table if you dont belive me, or take a chem class


Maybe when I have some money I'll check it out.

I did look at a periodic table. Titanium is very light. Group 4, Period 4, symbol Ti, atomic weight 47.9. Iron has atomic weight 55.8. What you're probably looking at is Tl, Thallium, with atomic weight 204.3.
#35
Quote by Blaster Bob
Maybe when I have some money I'll check it out.

I did look at a periodic table. Titanium is very light. Group 4, Period 4, symbol Ti, atomic weight 47.9. Iron has atomic weight 55.8. What you're probably looking at is Tl, Thallium, with atomic weight 204.3.

well i never said its as much as iron , i mean ****ing crisht iron is heavy , and thallium should never be concidered . when you compare ti to aluminum , which together make ti alloy , you can see a huge diffrence , im not even going to get into the diffrent types of steel considering there are 3 types of steel each with its own subcatigorys and everysingle one has diffrent propertys.
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i im gonna have to agree with t heff
#36
Quote by notsofun
Surprised to see that no one has mentioned that aluminum is stronger than steel...


Depends on what you mean by stronger... Pound for poud Aluminum is a lot stronger (as is wood) but as for equal sizes steel is stronger but not by much.
#37
Quote by t heff
well i never said its as much as iron , i mean ****ing crisht iron is heavy , and thallium should never be concidered . when you compare ti to aluminum , which together make ti alloy , you can see a huge diffrence , im not even going to get into the diffrent types of steel considering there are 3 types of steel each with its own subcatigorys and everysingle one has diffrent propertys.

But still, most people seem to compare Ti frets to SS ones, and Ti is considerably lighter than SS. But yeah- Ti has a density of 4.506, where Al weighs in at a mere 2.70. This is what one should look at to be 100% sure, and not the weight of the nucleus.
#38
i cnat belive we are arguing chem in a guitar building forum
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i im gonna have to agree with t heff
#40
Stainless steel frets are already hard enough for any amount of string work you might be doing, titanium would be an unnecessary overkill. not to mention, that it would be difficult to find a techie that would be willing to sacrifice his/her valuable tools attempting to level or crown these things.

EDIT: I still haven't found a techie that would carve a brass nut for the sake of his tools. I've also been convinced that a bone nut is just fine.
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Last edited by Kivarenn82 at Oct 21, 2007,
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