#1
I've never used one

in your guy's opinion is it really necessary?

do you only need one with crappy gear?

do you only need one if you have a ton of pedals?

does a noise suppressor suck tone?

what is the best noise suppressor in your opinion?

this is more general so I'm not gonna list my gear or anything


on a completely different random note whats the difference between a 5150 head and a 6505 head... i feel too lazy right now to figure it out myself... plus i should be doing homework, college is freaking hard haha
#3
THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A 6505 and 5150.

I own a 6505+ and i use a noise supressor because there's a bit of hiss.
Quote by csn00b
I hate seeing cute girls topless and what not, it just feels wrong.
#5
Noise gates/suppressors are generally used for two things. First off, they are used to cut down on buzz/hum coming from the guitar and the pedal chain before the amp. This includes the 60 cycle hum common to many single coils, noisy pedals, interference from certain types of lighting, and interference from other electronic sources nearby (radio signals, microwaves, on board effects, etc.). When used in this fashion, a noise suppressor is basically trying to clean up the guitar signal before it hits the gain stages in the preamp so that the aforementioned buzz is not amplified. The problem with this is that it can suck tone if you don't put it first in the pedal chain, and it's generally only really effective when placed last in the pedal chain.

The other way of using a noise suppressor is to place it between the preamp and the power amp (generally using a series effects loop). When used in this fashion, it's working to eliminate the harmonic overtones and feedback often caused by a heavily processed signal fed into a preamp with multiple gain stages. The problem with this is that the noise suppressor doesn't magically know whether it's being fed a guitar signal or an overtone when you are playing and though the sound itself ends up more precise, the individual notes may not.

This is why I'm a big fan of ISP Technologies. ISP has a noise suppressor pedal (not dissimilar in function from others) that is arguably the best at what it does. But for many of us that's not good enough. This is why they have the ProRackG. Put as simply as possible, the ProRackG is a two channel noise suppressor in which both channels are sharing information. Channel one isolates a clean guitar signal in front of the amp and channel two can then isolate the same signal after the preamp. In reality it's a bit more complex than that, but it's still remarkably effective.

Noise suppressors can be just as effective (or ineffective) in a three hundred dollar rig as they are in a three thousand dollar rig and it really comes down to the individual and his/her goals to determine whether or not one is necessary.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#6
Quote by Kendall
Noise gates/suppressors are generally used for two things. First off, they are used to cut down on buzz/hum coming from the guitar and the pedal chain before the amp. This includes the 60 cycle hum common to many single coils, noisy pedals, interference from certain types of lighting, and interference from other electronic sources nearby (radio signals, microwaves, on board effects, etc.). When used in this fashion, a noise suppressor is basically trying to clean up the guitar signal before it hits the gain stages in the preamp so that the aforementioned buzz is not amplified. The problem with this is that it can suck tone if you don't put it first in the pedal chain, and it's generally only really effective when placed last in the pedal chain.

The other way of using a noise suppressor is to place it between the preamp and the power amp (generally using a series effects loop). When used in this fashion, it's working to eliminate the harmonic overtones and feedback often caused by a heavily processed signal fed into a preamp with multiple gain stages. The problem with this is that the noise suppressor doesn't magically know whether it's being fed a guitar signal or an overtone when you are playing and though the sound itself ends up more precise, the individual notes may not.

This is why I'm a big fan of ISP Technologies. ISP has a noise suppressor pedal (not dissimilar in function from others) that is arguably the best at what it does. But for many of us that's not good enough. This is why they have the ProRackG. Put as simply as possible, the ProRackG is a two channel noise suppressor in which both channels are sharing information. Channel one isolates a clean guitar signal in front of the amp and channel two can then isolate the same signal after the preamp. In reality it's a bit more complex than that, but it's still remarkably effective.

Noise suppressors can be just as effective (or ineffective) in a three hundred dollar rig as they are in a three thousand dollar rig and it really comes down to the individual and his/her goals to determine whether or not one is necessary.


you wrote more than i did in my english essay. but it's a good thing cos i fail at english
Sincerely,
Shitstirrer