#1
Okay how the hell do i do this?
So far i've learned quite a bit of theory but to be honest it hasn't helped me in writing songs at all. I usually just write whatever sounds good and writing solos are the same way. I ask this because for the past 3 months i haven't been able to write a song but i do have a few riffs that i want to try and put together. So for all those people that swear that learning theory will help you write songs or help you branch out and stuff, how do you do it? Because it seems like it's still a guessing game to figure out what notes of a scale or chord progressions sound good together.
Quote by csn00b
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#2
do you have guitar pro?

if so then check the solo for this jazz song out:

if not then go to https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=684821&highlight=metal-ish+song+c4c and check out the audio.

that is how.

you pick a key, pick a progression. Use the chords and use their modes/arpeggios to create something amazing.
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Last edited by devilscruffs14 at Oct 20, 2007,
#3
1. Choose a key
2.Choose a time signature
3. Choose the scales that go with the progression. Since you're a beginner, I'd say simple major/minors, and their pentatonics.
4.Choose a cadence.
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#4
Quote by sTx
1. Choose a key
2.Choose a time signature
3. Choose the scales that go with the progression. Since you're a beginner, I'd say simple major/minors, and their pentatonics.
4.Choose a cadence.



I wouldn't consider myself a beginner. I'm trying to write more progressive music (dream theater like ) but it's really hard to write in different time signature and still make is sound good or change themes mid song.
Quote by csn00b
I hate seeing cute girls topless and what not, it just feels wrong.
#5
Quote by devilscruffs14
do you have guitar pro?

if so then check the solo for this jazz song out:

if not then go to https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=684821&highlight=metal-ish+song+c4c and check out the audio.

that is how.

you pick a key, pick a progression. Use the chords and use their modes/arpeggios to create something amazing.



Need to convert both to GP4
Quote by csn00b
I hate seeing cute girls topless and what not, it just feels wrong.
#6
try now. i couldnt get the second one, but the first one (the attatchment in this thread) is gp4.

now i shall take the time to analyze the jazz piece for you:

Bars 17-18 work because they are in C dorian, and the chord underneath it is Cm7, and Dorian works over min 7 chords.

bars 19-20 are using the F mixolydian, which works over Dom7, or dom9,, dom13 or domAnything.

bars 17-18 are again over Cm7, but this time it is c aeolian which is good over min7 also.

Bars 23 -24 are over G7#9, and i used C harmonic minor, because G& is the Dominant V chord in the C minor key, which the song is in.

bars 24-25 is over Cm7 again, and I usedthe C blues scale.

bars 26-27 is over Ab13, which i used a Ab7 arpeggio over, because you can substitute dom7 for dom13.

bars 28-29 is over Dm7b5 (D half diminished) and G7#9 and so i used a diminished arpeggio over it.

the first half of bar 30 is in C Aeolian, over Cmin7

the scond half of bar 30 is in E mixolydian over Eb9

the first half of bar 31 should actually sound really bad cuz its a diminished arpeggio over a maj7 chord, but since they are both diatonic and there are no sharps and flats it sound okay.

the second half of bar 31 is just in C blues to end the solo.
Last edited by devilscruffs14 at Oct 21, 2007,
#7
Music theory doesn't write music, people do.

Music theory helps you find what you hear in your head. If you don't hear anything in your head when writing you are just stumbling around. You're forcing it and it's going to come out very rigid. Music is about expressing your creativity so If you have nothing to express, how can you express it?
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#8
well, there's the mathematical method like everyone has been suggesting... pick a key, pick a time signature, pick this, pick that, pick your ass...

what i usually do it just jam, improvise, mess around, etc, until i find a little lick that i enjoy. As soon as i have one phrase, i see what kind of theory it can be explained with... maybe it's phrygian, maybe it's a nice relationship between two chords, a nice melody, a nice rhythm, or whatever.

once i know that, i know what some of my potential options are, such as whether i should play in a major or minor key, and what flavours of chords i can use within that key to emphasize the melody i've just written, or maybe if i started in an odd time signature, i should return to a simple one for the next part of the song.

essentially, you can't just memorize note names and scale patterns. you have to understand intervals, and how all chords, scales, melodies and harmonies are based on intervals and octaves, and then it becomes easier to actually APPLY theory to your songs.

think of theory as the language of music. once you understand language enough to talk about abstract concepts, you can start creating new ideas. once you understand intervals and how they bring clarity to all this music theory, you can use it to create new musical ideas.
#9
I just read something about modulation but i dont know how it works. Help?
Quote by csn00b
I hate seeing cute girls topless and what not, it just feels wrong.
#11
You should learn about keys man!For example if you`re in the key of C major you have the notes: C D E F G A B. "Build" a chord on each note of the scale. How do you do this? Simple.Take the first third and fifth notes: C E and G.This a Cmaj chord,Now do the same thing but this time start on the second note D.This would be: D F A, a Dminchord

So if you take this" play one skip one" approach you`ll get Cmaj,Dmin,Emin,Fmaj,Gmaj,Amin,Bdim

These are the seven chords in the the key of C major. It´s the same in every key.
So for instance: The key of Gmajor: G A B C D E F#. G B D, G MAJ
A C E, A MIN
B D F#, B MIN
C E G, C maj

e.t.c You get it right?
#13
Quote by rich72
You should learn about keys man!For example if you`re in the key of C major you have the notes: C D E F G A B. "Build" a chord on each note of the scale. How do you do this? Simple.Take the first third and fifth notes: C E and G.This a Cmaj chord,Now do the same thing but this time start on the second note D.This would be: D F A, a Dminchord

So if you take this" play one skip one" approach you`ll get Cmaj,Dmin,Emin,Fmaj,Gmaj,Amin,Bdim

These are the seven chords in the the key of C major. It´s the same in every key.
So for instance: The key of Gmajor: G A B C D E F#. G B D, G MAJ
A C E, A MIN
B D F#, B MIN
C E G, C maj

e.t.c You get it right?



^What he said, then build from there. There's your chords and your key, so now all you have to do is, well, go for it. If you are looking for a certain style, pick the mode that accomadates that style (Go to the Theory FAQ sticky and it has info on all of the modes). Just remember that it isn't a rule carved in stone. Have fun with it.
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