#1
I am at a beginner level and can play basic barre chords like F and B. Today I was trying to learn Hey Jude and one of the chords is Gm7 which requires the G string to be barred. I simply can't do it and I don't see any amount of practice changing this. I can barre every other string but G is always muted! It doesn't matter how hard I press my finger is just incapable of barring every string including G.

What can I do?
#2
hmm how meaty are your fingers? mine are pretty skinny, so what i do is feel when the string is against the bone of the finger while barring it. it takes some getting used to the nail it properly during chord changes, but sounds great
Anyone who thinks that music these days is dead doesn't listen to enough music.
#3
Just keep practicing, it'll come. Ideally you want your index finger to bend inwards so that you're making solid contact with all the frets. If it help try turning your index slightly so you're barring with the side and not the bottom.
#4
Quote by dsotm73
hmm how meaty are your fingers? mine are pretty skinny, so what i do is feel when the string is against the bone of the finger while barring it. it takes some getting used to the nail it properly during chord changes, but sounds great


My fingers are unfortunatly meaty, I wish I had your fingers. When you say bone of the finger I assume you mean bottom of the finger. I tryed doing this with my middle finger wrapped around my index finger (just to see if I could fret the G string with more preassure) and it sort of worked (not perfectly but far from muted). But I can't imagine ever being able to apply that much preassure with only my index finger.
#5
Quote by Garou1911
Just keep practicing, it'll come. Ideally you want your index finger to bend inwards so that you're making solid contact with all the frets. If it help try turning your index slightly so you're barring with the side and not the bottom.


Unfortunatly I have meaty fingers and wide knuckles. So if I use the side of my finger that really screws things up. When you say my index finger should be bent inwards are you saying it is a mistake if my whole index finger is straight? Should the bottom of my index finger bend inward and the rest straight?
#6
It is about practise which strengthens your hand so you are able to clamp the strings down. Try keeping your thumb behind your finger (under the neck) rather than wrapping it round the neck. Also in time your hand will get used to forming the chords and it will just keep getting easier.
You could also try a lighter set of strings which will make it easier to hold down chords. Remember this may (not always) in turn mean you need a set up.
#7
I have the same problem, skinny finges, big knuckles, g string always muted.
what i find helps is to move your barring finger to the left so the bony knucklly part of your finger is fretting the g string- this probably will cause your d string to be muted, but luckily most chords that have g string barred have the d string pushed down by other fingers
#8
i struggled for about a year with the barre chord but eventually with a lot of persistence and practice i finally managed to get all the strings sounding sweet. keep on practicing and your finger strength will increase. trust me. good luck
#9
If it makes you feel any better, I've been playing for about 6 years, and I can't get it, but in a recent surge of desire to get some skills, I've been practicing just barring with the index. I figure it's easier to get that down first than to do it with the other fingers at the same time.
Quote by markr17
go eat a hermanpherdite.
#10
i dont know if your doing this but have your thumb push down a bit harder on the neck
#11
I now realise that playing basic barre chords have made my index finger lazy. I have started to focus on fretting all strings with just the index finger. I use the bottom of my finger, push as hard as I can to the bone and get my thumb right behind my index finger. I am starting to get some sound from the G string although it doesnt sound good. But at least it's not muted. I can only do this temporarily and then I have to take a break. My index finger feels like it's been given a severe indian burn. I guess I have to fight through the pain like I did when I first learned how to play F.
#13
Quote by kidken
I simply can't do it and I don't see any amount of practice changing this.

i know you can't see any amount of practice changing this, but you're wrong. just keep practicing. i promise you that eventually you will get it!
#15
1. Finger strength and position of your wrist is really important...you might want to get a tennis ball and practice squeezing on it as a daily exercise.

2. I liked the post of the previous guy...did you notice that his wrist is arched? That is not an accident. You will get a lot more power if you master doing that...It automatically puts your thumb in the right position, and gives you extra power pushing down with your barring finger.

3. "Lord, give me patience...and I want it right now!" A lot of years ago, I was trying to learn the independent-thumb (sort of Chet Atkins without the mutes) technique. After a month, I had all but given up...then one day, as I sat down to practice, I found myself doing it without noticing! Voila! The Germans call that a Gestalt. It is the Aha syndrome. Keep at it, and you WILL get it.

Joey45
#16
Thank you all for your tips and words of encouragement. I won't give up! **cue Rocky theme**