#1
Anyone have some? I'm talking about music notation, not tab, btw. The things I've figured out are: Check key signature, check time signature, check for any accidental, etc. Anyone have any else? Also what are some good songs to work on for sight reading?
#2
I'm not exactly good at sight reading, but I might as well state the obvious: read as much as you can. As for songs to work on, that would depend completely on you and your skill level.
#3
yeah taht's true. are there any good beginner to intermediate level music notation books that you guys can think of?
#4
Read what you can finish within a decent amount of time. Always try to read ahead and to keep a steady count of the rhythms. Also, after you have sightread through a piece a few times, begin working out the piece musically from phrase to phrase, so that, as you progressively move up to harder music, that you can see the notes within a musical context, and play accordingly.
#5
Uhh...back when I was still taking lessons, I only knew where the notes were on the staff, and my teacher gave me A Modern Method for Guitar: Volume One by William Leavitt. There are three volumes in the set. Maybe have a look at those.
#6
Quote by Erc
Read what you can finish within a decent amount of time. Always try to read ahead and to keep a steady count of the rhythms. Also, after you have sightread through a piece a few times, begin working out the piece musically from phrase to phrase, so that, as you progressively move up to harder music, that you can see the notes within a musical context, and play accordingly.

good points. Reading ahead definitely took me a long time to get better at, but I have improved.

thanks kirby, I'll check it out.
#7
Try to keep the rhythm no matter how much you have to slow it down at first. (My teacher says you can read anything if you take down the tempo enough.) Start out with 4 beats per measure, thats easiest. If you have trouble keeping track of the lines and spaces, remember the spaces spell "FACE" and the middle line is B. Hope that helps
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#8
Something that helps me that my guitar teacher taught me is to play positionally at first. Generally it's not a good idea to limit yourself to a "box" or a "pattern", but when you sight read, its perfectly fine. When you know how the song goes, then add slides, bends, and change positions to get the right sound and the right techniques you're looking for. A good book for sight reading that has a lot of great songs in it is The Real Book. It is a manilla colored book, pretty thick, with hundreds of jazz standards.
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#9
Well, seeing as how you're sight reading sheet music, I imagine you're using some type of classical or fingerpicking technique, as opposed to flat picking which doesn't have nearly as much literature. If so, try something akin to Carcassi or Tarrega.
#10
Quote by 5/4
Well, seeing as how you're sight reading sheet music, I imagine you're using some type of classical or fingerpicking technique, as opposed to flat picking which doesn't have nearly as much literature. If so, try something akin to Carcassi or Tarrega.

Nope. I just figure it'd be better to improve at sight reading actual music and not just tabs.
#11
A few things I suggest(books and other things):

- Never stop because of a mistake, the only way you can train good sightreading is through this idea. It forces you to keep rhythm and look ahead.

- Never sightread the same thing within a week or so. Have new material everyday. You can recycle some particularlly difficult readings by the next week.

- Great books:

Fred Hamilton's "Melodic Compositions for the Guitar" (I think that's the name)

Melodic Rhythms for Guitar from Berklee

Reading studies for guitar from Berklee

The last three books that I suggested are really for someone who can atleast read simple 4/4 melodies that don't really go above 1/8 notes. If you are at that stage then these will start perfect and push you to a much higher level of proficiency. If you are not at that stage just first take the time to associate yourself with reading in general and knowing where the notes on the fretboard lay out. The william leavitt book is great for that.

Good luck.
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#12
Thanks a lot a VR! I will definitely check them out. I've had six years of musc, so I don't think I should have any problems with it.