#1
Horrible, I don't know if I just got a bad one, but I can't make it sound good. I'm trying to record guitar, but when i record it sounds really distant, and honestly not much better than my 10 dollar mic for my computer.
#2
Provide more detail, what kind of preamp are you using? How is the 57 positioned on the amp?
#4
I didn't know you needed a pre-amp. xD

I'm just plugging straight into the recording unit, a Tascam tape recorder. And jammingguitarist, I'm not sure I need that because I plug using the XLR cable straight into an XLR female input on my recording unit...

And for the mic position, I'm a little bit off the cone of the speaker, on axis.
#5
Quote by llanafreak44
Horrible, I don't know if I just got a bad one, but I can't make it sound good. I'm trying to record guitar, but when i record it sounds really distant, and honestly not much better than my 10 dollar mic for my computer.



Are you even using a preamp? Do you have a crappy amp?
#7
A mic without a preamp!?!? You're mad!

Anyways, that's your problem.
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#8
What Pre-amp should I get? Keep in mind that it took me almost 3 months to save up the 65$ for a used SM-57.
#9
Sounds like you need a job.

The best discount preamps out there, in my opinion, are the ART Tube MPs, M-Audio DMP3, or Studio Projects vtb-1. The Tube MPs are the cheapest though, and deliver good results.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

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#11
An analog MT tape recorder with XLR inputs?!?!?
First time I've heard that one.

As for a cheap but OK preamp you can try this:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/ART-Tube-MP-Studio-Mic-Preamp?sku=180581

You're off to a great start on the gear...the JCM amp and SM57 are good products.
but recording takes lots of money so get yourself a great paying job and save for the high end gear from the first time you buy it because when you buy cheap gear, you buy twice.
Last edited by moody07747 at Oct 23, 2007,
#12
I think it's going to be difficult getting great sound out of a tape recorder, no matter what mic you use. It's like being upset that you don't get good results out of five thousand dollar tires when you put them on a kia rio.
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#13
^ +1 yet he wont get great sounds but it will be "ok"

I suggest something like a toneport or some other type of interface to replace the analog recorder as the toneports have preamps built in as well as a lot of other features.
#15
Get a good mixer... or if you have a Guitar USB interface with built-in preamp, this one can be used, but with few software tweaks ofc.
#16
Quote by moody07747
An analog MT tape recorder with XLR inputs?!?!?
First time I've heard that one.



Quote by BrianApocalypse
Your recording unit has an XLR female input? wow.


Is that unusual?

Yeah I guess i'll just sell that recorder on ebay. I havn't gotten good results with it ever. I'll get atleast 100$ for it for sure. Am I better off with a portable digital recorder or just using an interface? Even then, will I still need a pre-amp?


Plus I'm not just recording guitar, I'm going to be recording drums and vocals too. I've already applied for like 5 jobs, so hopefully someone calls, and I'm going to be working soon. So maybe around 1000$ dollars is my limit? Because my friend is pitching in too.
Last edited by llanafreak44 at Oct 22, 2007,
#18
Thanks for the fast reply! I was looking at the presonus firewire thing with 8 XLR inputs, and I was looking at a Phonics 18 channel mixer with firewire inputs for the computer. Anyone have any experience on these?
#19
Hmm... I dont have experience in those specific products, but I can tell you, Firewire is way better than USB for recording...
#21
Oh okay well, if you need any further recording help, just PM me, I have experience in this stuff so I can help.

Cya, good luck
#22
Quote by llanafreak44
Is that unusual?


Yes, almost all interfaces and tape recorders have a male input, or inputs, for phantom mikes.
#23
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Yes, almost all interfaces and tape recorders have a male input, or inputs, for phantom mikes.



Oh I see now, you were just being a dick because I made a confusion between male and female inputs . My bad, it's male.
#24
The Presonus Firepod which you said you're looking at would be a great choice, everyone I know who has one loves it. Just make sure you do your homework on these things. Read read read.
#25
Allright, well I'm almost positive 1 out of 5 jobs will call me, so, what are some decent drum mics? I was thinking about these, since they look good for a pretty low price. http://www.zzounds.com/item--CADDMTP7
#26
Quote by llanafreak44
Allright, well I'm almost positive 1 out of 5 jobs will call me, so, what are some decent drum mics? I was thinking about these, since they look good for a pretty low price. http://www.zzounds.com/item--CADDMTP7


You don't need 7 drum mics. Just make sure that your mic collection consists of at least two small-diaphragm condensers and two dynamics. You can record a 3-7 piece drum set with just 4 microphones and get great quality.

All you need to do is hang the condensers over the centre of the kit in X/Y, or if you want more snare definition, separate them by equal distances from the centre of the snare. Then mic up the kick drum and snare (if you need to).

This way you don't need 7 microphones exclusively for your drums.
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#29
i think i heard MXL900 somewhere... as nice condenser mics. i looked at them and they were like $50...
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#30
Quote by llanafreak44
Thanks for the fast reply! I was looking at the presonus firewire thing with 8 XLR inputs, and I was looking at a Phonics 18 channel mixer with firewire inputs for the computer. Anyone have any experience on these?


Ive got the Presonus firepod, its great, awesome machine, extremely good quality recordings for the price and such... They are used in some of the best studio's all around the world... I highly recomend it..
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#31
Quote by Muphin
You don't need 7 drum mics. Just make sure that your mic collection consists of at least two small-diaphragm condensers and two dynamics. You can record a 3-7 piece drum set with just 4 microphones and get great quality.

All you need to do is hang the condensers over the centre of the kit in X/Y, or if you want more snare definition, separate them by equal distances from the centre of the snare. Then mic up the kick drum and snare (if you need to).

This way you don't need 7 microphones exclusively for your drums.


Yes exactly!
I use a Sm57 for tthe snare, two seinhiser condensers as overheads and a beghrah dynamic for the bass drum and it does a very good job for live recordings....

Vocals i use Rode NT1 condenser... And obviously a sm57 for guitar...
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#32
Jazz drums tend to be recorded with 3 mics: 2 overheads and one fairly distant pointing at the bass drum. 4 is probably best for rock/pop etc for a sound engineer on a budget. You can always add more later if you're not happy with the results.
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#33
Quote by llanafreak44
Oh I see now, you were just being a dick because I made a confusion between male and female inputs . My bad, it's male.


You wouldn't make the mistake in biology, don't make it in the studio

If I had to record drums with 4 mics, I'd use an EVRE20 on the kick drum, a 57 beta underneath the snare and a couple of small diaphragm AKGs as overheads.
#34
what do you see is the benefit of having the mic underneath the snare? just curious as i have always placed mine on top (although i am saving up for a audix i5 for under the snare )
maybe so...maybe so young one.

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#35
Quote by Mr.Loomis_shred
what do you see is the benefit of having the mic underneath the snare? just curious as i have always placed mine on top (although i am saving up for a audix i5 for under the snare )


I'm interested as well.
And can I hear examples from you drum recorders out there?
Last edited by llanafreak44 at Oct 23, 2007,
#36
I've not analysed the sounds in isolation, but given the right phasing settings, it thickens out the sound and makes the snare sound better.

Now, overheads pick up a f*ckload of snare, so when you are limited in # of mikes, you don't really need a snare on top.

Plus, of course, snare is THE microphone that is the most likely bar far to be hit while recording, which can of course ruin the take and damage an expensive piece of equipment.

Finally, as long as the underside isn't too close miked (which is never a good idea because you can pick up wire vibrations on gaps such as tom fills, you also get an extra bit of kick, which fills it out. - some people like to record the pedal as well!

And that's why I prefer to record the underside of the snare drum.

I could probably post more if I had a good listen, but this is my reasoning at the time of writing (and this is the first time I've had an opportunity to use more than 4 mikes on a drum kit)