#1
And I am having a blast. What I have been doing is studying some of my favorite guitarist's music, and the person I have been looking at is Jimmy Page. However, I have recently took on a different project, and have learned most of Crazy Train (very fun to play, IMO). Not to mention I have been playing Hangar 18, which has utterly destroyed my confidence in myself ( I can play about half of the song, up until 2:58, in which I kill myself immediately after attempting). Now, I am not sure wether to continue Hangar 18, or maybe start Achilles Last Stand, one of my all time favorite songs. Even though I do think I have done quite well in my 7 months, I don't think I am ready to play something like Hangar 18 (or, at least, the part where I am). However, I might be able to be masochistic enough to force myself to finish the song. What do you guys think? Should I keep trying to play Hangar 18, or finish Crazy Train and start Achilles?

BTW, the tab for Achilles Last Stand (Version Two) on this site is extremely nice. Kudos to whoever did that.
#2
At this point i'd suggest learning the pentatonic scale and learning how to improv. Your style needs it!
"The future's uncertain, and The End is always near."
-Jim Morrison
#3
Quote by SlinkyBlue
At this point i'd suggest learning the pentatonic scale and learning how to improv. Your style needs it!


+1. Look into scales and such and learn how they work. Then you can run through them during solos and such. And there's no reason why you can't learn all those songs at one time. Learn a part in one, then learn a part in another one. That way you don't burn out by just repeating the same stuff over and over again. Congrats on the progress and good luck.
#4
agreed, improvistation really accelerated my learning. i can already play solo's like master of puppets and seek and destroy in only two years.
#5
first and foremost, yeah it's fun to play your favorite bands songs, but learn your scales, theory, chords, timing, nothing feels better than playing something that you made up yourself.
#6
Which part of Hangar 18 are you learning? The rhythm part (Mustaine), or the solos (Friedman). Because if you are playing the solos up until 2:58, you are doing amazing.
Be cool.
#7
I've been playing about 13 months and I can play most SRV decently well. Not the speed, but I can do it.

www.myspace.com/bluegoose8255

Because I've practiced the hell out of pentatonic scales. I think if you learn it and implement it into your style it would be sweet.
"The future's uncertain, and The End is always near."
-Jim Morrison
#8
...How could anyone learn "most of" Crazy Train at 7 months, let alone Hangar 18 up to 3 minutes? You mean both of the main riffs of those, minus fills/solos, or the whole shebang?

If you mean the latter, then I want to ask you 2 questions: How often do you practice, and can I have your autograph?
#9
^Um, well I did for Crazy Train. Took about 9 months for it all. The solo's aren't nailed 100% because I went on to a whole different style, more suited to the music I enjoyed... not just what would make me look cool. I hadn't tackled Hangar 18.

As for you, dear poster... just practice all the theory you can. It will help you better understand what your doing. I wish you good luck. I hope we see you on MTV someday... in a long time... when they start playing music again. :P:
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Quote by Sammythedruggie

touche sir.
#10
As far as how much I learned of Crazy Train, I know the intro, the main riff, three or so fills and the solo. Hangar 18, on the other hand, I have been practicing the solos (Friedman), and can play the intro, along with the rhythm of the first "part", as I call it. And I can't play those solos exactly ... maybe I can play three of them note for note, but the other ones I am still working on (for instance, the second solo, where Friedman uses sweep picking... ugh...)
#11
Quote by elekguit
^Um, well I did for Crazy Train. Took about 9 months for it all. The solo's aren't nailed 100% because I went on to a whole different style, more suited to the music I enjoyed... not just what would make me look cool. I hadn't tackled Hangar 18.

As for you, dear poster... just practice all the theory you can. It will help you better understand what your doing. I wish you good luck. I hope we see you on MTV someday... in a long time... when they start playing music again. :P:


thatd be something if one us from ug was on mtv or tv in general playing guitar
#12
Quote by elekguit
I hope we see you on MTV someday... in a long time... when they start playing music again. :P:


I'll work on being able to fit a song or two in between episodes of Super Sweet Sixteen and The Real World.
#13
i love it when i read "im having a blast"

definetly learn the Pentatonic scale...learn the blues one if you wanna go Jimmy Page style.

with knowledge of the pentatonic scale you can figure out the Hangar 18 solo on the SPOT while youre playing it.
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#14
Quote by Someone18
As far as how much I learned of Crazy Train, I know the intro, the main riff, three or so fills and the solo. Hangar 18, on the other hand, I have been practicing the solos (Friedman), and can play the intro, along with the rhythm of the first "part", as I call it. And I can't play those solos exactly ... maybe I can play three of them note for note, but the other ones I am still working on (for instance, the second solo, where Friedman uses sweep picking... ugh...)



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#15
Quote by HyperBoy2519
i love it when i read "im having a blast"

definetly learn the Pentatonic scale...learn the blues one if you wanna go Jimmy Page style.

with knowledge of the pentatonic scale you can figure out the Hangar 18 solo on the SPOT while youre playing it.


Beware that Marty Friedman may not always be playing fast, but he's always using strange notes that don't quite fit and all kinds of bends and pre-bends.

The pentatonic scale is very useful, as is the blues scale, but to say that knowing these allows you to figure out the Hangar 18 solo in the spot is a bit, well, not true, really.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#16
well man for 7 months of playing im impressed....unless you can stop time.
but yeah man learn scalesthey will help with the solos alot and keep doing what you have been doing and you will really get somewere
good luck man.
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#17
Just play what you enjoy playing!
But don't neglect your excercises. They are very important. Learn the scales, (Pentatonic, Major, Minor etc) string skipping, CAGED chords, note names, and you'll get a good grounding for any further work you'll want to do.
Hanger 18 is an awesome track though! Good luck!!!!!
Try some Alex Lifeson and Tony Iommi solos as well. They are not really into speed, just creating masterful, interesting, and structured pieces.