#1
I need any tips to being able to reconize all three types of 7th chord inversions when written out on a staff and what the root is in the inversion. I've got it down with triads, but I can't seem to be able to know what chord inversion I'm looking at with 7th chords.
12 fret fury
#2
The way I was able to remember it was like this: First inversion, all of the notes are spaced evenly. Second inversion, there's a 2nd interval at the top, so one of the notes will be sticking out a bit. From there, just look at where the 2nd interval is between the 7th and octave. I always look for the sticking out notes to figure it out, and judging by what is in the bass, I'll figure out what inversion it is. If you need more specific, in a 3rd inversion, the second interval will be the second from the top, and the root is the second note down. Etc. If that was a ****ty explanation and you want me to explain it better, email me at axlredd9@yahoo.com
#3
Here's a link to my lesson on this subject:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/chords/chords_discover_new_voicing_part_1.html

The article only uses maj7 chords as the example, but here's how you can go from maj7 to other types of 7th chords:

maj7: 1-3-5-7
flat the 7 to turn the maj7 chord into a dominant 7th chord
7: 1-3-5-b7
flat the 3 to turn the dominant 7th chord into a m7 chord
m7: 1-b3-5-b7
flat the 5 to turn the m7 chord into a m7b5 (or half-diminished) chord
m7b5: 1-b3-b5-b7
flat the 7 again to turn it into a diminished 7 chord
*7: 1-b3-b5-bb7

Also, from the m7 chord, sharp the 7 to turn it into a m(maj7) chord.
Here's an example of all of the above:
Cmaj7: C-E-G-B
C7: C-E-G-Bb
Cm7: C-Eb-G-Bb
Cm7b5: C-Eb-Gb-Bb
Cm(maj7): C-Eb-G-B
C*7: C-Eb-Gb-Bbb or C-Eb-Gb-A
#4
He's not asking for how a chord is formed (thank god for that!), he's asking for shortcuts in reading chords with standard notation.

Root position (root in bass) - even spaced
1st inversion (3rd in bass)- 2nd at the top
2nd inversion (5th in bass)- 2nd in the middle
3rd inversion (7th in bass) - 2nd at the bottom
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
Quote by Ænimus Prime
He's not asking for how a chord is formed (thank god for that!), he's asking for shortcuts in reading chords with standard notation.

Root position (root in bass) - even spaced
1st inversion (3rd in bass)- 2nd at the top
2nd inversion (5th in bass)- 2nd in the middle
3rd inversion (7th in bass) - 2nd at the bottom


The only thing is, the root might not necessarily be in those places. For instance, in second inversion, the root might actually be up an octave, and it would therefore be on top.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#6
Well thats when you actually have to read
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#7
Well one thing I do know is that a 1st inversion 7th chord takes the root and puts it up an octave so if you have a C 7th chords (C E G Bb) and you invert it that way then it becomes (E G Bb C) and its notated as 6 over 5. I'm pretty sure that's right atleast.
12 fret fury
#8
See unfortunetely with inversions is that the order of the notes doesn't matter except for the bottem note. For example a C7 in 2nd inversion could look like this

E-C-G-Bb

or

E-C-Bb-G

or

E-G-C-Bb

ect


So it all comes down to figuring out how the chord works diatonicall (thirds) and then figuring out if the 3rd, 5th, or 7th is on the bottem.


So if you saw this on a staff

A-F#-C#-D

figure out how the thirds are layed out to figure out the chord

D-F#-A-C#

so it's a Dmaj7

see that the the 5th (A) is on the bottem and know that when the fifth is on the bottem it's in second position. Hope that helped. I don't really know of a shortcut