#1
So several times in my playing "career" i've started working on a specific lick or excercise. Normally I make great progress in the first week, however after that I tend to hit a wall and can't get back to where I was before. let me give you an example. A while ago I start practicing this paul gilbert lick I put together, and like I said for the week it went well. I was up to about 85 bpm (which isn't a fast tempo, but it had some fast 16th note tripplets). The next week though, I couldn't even do 80. I spent like a week and half an hour or so a day working up from a slow speed trying to get 80 perfect again and I just couldn't. What's the deal?
#2
Maybe you got so used to concentrating on getting it perfect, you realised it wasn't perfect at that tempo?
#4
just break down the song into parts, and practice the parts slowly and build up the speed, dont start at a super fast speed. Make sure you're warmed up that changes a ton of your playing abilites
|
#5
How long have you been playing? 16th notes at 85 is pretty slow. You sure you don't mean 32nds?
Also, practice on the clean channel. It REALLY HELPS your playing.
#6
just over 2 years. sixteenth notes at 85 are no problem. the tripplets are quite a bit faster though, and it's only the picked ones I have problems with. playing the clean channel definitely helps you hear mistakes, but it doesn't magically make you play better or anything.

if anyone's interested, here's the spot that was giving me trouble (again, only the picked parts).

Last edited by Spamwise at Oct 25, 2007,
#7
Quote by Spamwise
just over 2 years. sixteenth notes at 85 are no problem. the tripplets are quite a bit faster though, and it's only the picked ones I have problems with. playing the clean channel definitely helps you hear mistakes, but it doesn't magically make you play better or anything.

if anyone's interested, here's the spot that was giving me trouble (again, only the picked parts).


I didn't say it would MAGICALLY suddenly improve your playing, sorry if I was unclear. I meant that in the LONG run, it really helps. And those are technically sextuplets that you are playing then.
Anyway, you seem to get that you need to play slow with a metronome to get better, so I won't get into that.
Are you picking the phrase according to the pick marks on the tab? If you are, that is strict alternate picking. Are you having problems with the string skips? the general picking itself?
#8
I wrote it out strictly alternate, but I think I started economy picking the string skipping part. I've done it so much I don't think about it anymore.

Well I can't say for sure. Like sometimes when I get to 80 bpm I'll do it perfect for like 6 or 7 tries, and then it just gets worse and worse.
#9
the only thing I can think of is that you might have a mental block for that speed.
Do you have a proper fretting hand position?
#10
What do you mean?

Yeah, as far as I know anyway. I've never experienced problems before.
#11
Quote by Spamwise
I wrote it out strictly alternate, but I think I started economy picking the string skipping part. I've done it so much I don't think about it anymore.

Well I can't say for sure. Like sometimes when I get to 80 bpm I'll do it perfect for like 6 or 7 tries, and then it just gets worse and worse.



I had this sort of thing with a different lick. (Ie, a beginner Paul Gilbert one). I practiced it mercilessly for about two weeks with a metronome, exactly how you're meant to. I started off by making really good progress. 60bpm got mastered really quickly and I could even hit 100 bpm on a really good day at the end of the 2nd week (yes, I AM a beginner...) and then a few days after this amazing progress I took a huge step backwards. It'd take me 6 to 8 hours of practicing to master the lick at 60bpm each day where it would take me less than an hour before. I think it's probably due to some ugly muscle memory quirk.

I stopped practicing the lick for a while, because other stuff kicked in. And now that I've revisited it, 60bpm is no problem, though I haven't scaled up from there yet.
#12
I have had this problem in the past, and I also have no idea how to overcome it.
#13
Quote by Cnaiur
I had this sort of thing with a different lick. (Ie, a beginner Paul Gilbert one). I practiced it mercilessly for about two weeks with a metronome, exactly how you're meant to. I started off by making really good progress. 60bpm got mastered really quickly and I could even hit 100 bpm on a really good day at the end of the 2nd week (yes, I AM a beginner...) and then a few days after this amazing progress I took a huge step backwards. It'd take me 6 to 8 hours of practicing to master the lick at 60bpm each day where it would take me less than an hour before. I think it's probably due to some ugly muscle memory quirk.

I stopped practicing the lick for a while, because other stuff kicked in. And now that I've revisited it, 60bpm is no problem, though I haven't scaled up from there yet.

yeah that's basically identical to me...I've stopped working on that one lick for now. I'll come back to it later and hopefully it'll be better. it's still an issue that needs to be adressed though.
#14
Work in groups of starting exactly on 1 click and ending on the next click. For
example 16th notes would be a group of 5: da(click)-da-da-da-da(click).

If you notice, doing just 1 group is fairly easy. Doing 2 groups might be a bit harder.
3 groups you might start losing it (when the metronome tempo is about at your
working speed). As groups are added, tension tends to build and you start losing
the beat. When that happens you're just guessing and then tend to trip over
your shoelaces.

So, the idea is practice each group in isolation without the accumulated tension of
previous groups interfering. Then start putting them together into longer and
longer groups. With this approach you'll tend to remain relaxed through the whole
thing and always know where the beat is falling.
#15
This happens to me all the time. I have no idea why but some days I'm better than the day before and some days I'm worse. For some reason what works with me is when I don't look at the guitar, I tend to play better if I have played it before. I just get my hand used to the position on the neck. Even if I have to do something like sliding from an F# power chord in the first position to an E power chord in the 12th, I try to do it without looking at the neck. If I can get my hand used to how and when to move then I don't even have to think about what I'm doing, my hands just play it from memory.
#16
Quote by Junior#1
This happens to me all the time. I have no idea why but some days I'm better than the day before and some days I'm worse. For some reason what works with me is when I don't look at the guitar, I tend to play better if I have played it before. I just get my hand used to the position on the neck. Even if I have to do something like sliding from an F# power chord in the first position to an E power chord in the 12th, I try to do it without looking at the neck. If I can get my hand used to how and when to move then I don't even have to think about what I'm doing, my hands just play it from memory.

yeah that's actually true with me too. I think it could be because when you're watching what you're doing you're thinking it through and thinking can mess you up sometimes.
#17
Quote by edg
Work in groups of starting exactly on 1 click and ending on the next click. For
example 16th notes would be a group of 5: da(click)-da-da-da-da(click).

If you notice, doing just 1 group is fairly easy. Doing 2 groups might be a bit harder.
3 groups you might start losing it (when the metronome tempo is about at your
working speed). As groups are added, tension tends to build and you start losing
the beat. When that happens you're just guessing and then tend to trip over
your shoelaces.

So, the idea is practice each group in isolation without the accumulated tension of
previous groups interfering. Then start putting them together into longer and
longer groups. With this approach you'll tend to remain relaxed through the whole
thing and always know where the beat is falling.

I used to do that with 4 notes, and that's where my problem occurred.