#1
OK, I just met this guitarist at me high school whose been playing guitar for the same amount of time I have (5 years) and today he gave me a simple chord progression...but I can't seem to figure out what song it is....He said it would "blow my mind"

He just told me that all the strings were tuned down a half step, then he gave me the chords G, D, Em, and C

I did all this in like 30 seconds, but the chords just come out jambled and clashy

Does anyone know what song he was trying to refer to?
Play the man, Master Ridley; we shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
Last edited by yurfinlfntsy at Oct 24, 2007,
#2
bass doesnt make it simple, theory does

i dunno, sounds familiar
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#5
It's thousand upon thousands of songs!
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#6
All I Can Do Is Write About It by Lynyrd Skynyrd has the same progression. As do many other songs.
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#8
For some reason, half of all pop songs seem to have this chord progression in there somewhere. Everything from Blink 182 to Black Eyed Peas.

I think it's more accurate to think of G-D-Em-C, or I-V-vi-IV, as a variant of I-IV-V (think Louie-Louie), which is certainly a popular progression, even not counting its variants.

It all comes from Medieval-to-Renaissance music, from what I know. Taking music theory in Freshman year, the entire chordal structure is based around I, IV, and V. The cadences, or "movements" in the music, are based on those chords. All the other chords are used as replacements for those chords (vi for IV, vii-dim for V, etc.). Modern Western music is largely a continuation of these musical ideas concerning chordal structure.

As far as why, considering how old this musical meme is, it must have something to do with human aesthetics. It might be worth mentioning that humans find the tritone (e.g. C/F#) unpleasant, and in the Medieval-to-Renaissance times you could be executed for writing or performing a tritone in your music, whether in a chord or outlined. This unpleasantness is exploited in sirens, foghorns, and warning whistles--the easily-identified ambulance siren is tuned in a tritone, and the Titanic's ship's horn/whistle was tuned F#/C/F# (with the F#s in octaves). Cool thing about the tritone: in Western scales/tuning, they're spaced equally apart, so the tritone of D is Ab/G# and vice-versa.
#10
how would that blow ones mind
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#11
Quote by yurfinlfntsy
OK, I just met this guitarist at me high school whose been playing guitar for the same amount of time I have (5 years) and today he gave me a simple chord progression...but I can't seem to figure out what song it is....He said it would "blow my mind"

He just told me that all the strings were tuned down a half step, then he gave me the chords G, D, Em, and C

I did all this in like 30 seconds, but the chords just come out jambled and clashy

Does anyone know what song he was trying to refer to?


BTW: He's played bass guitar for the entirety of his guitar teaching span, which is why its so simple lol


And for that ignorance, I'm never going to help you. Ever.
#12
At first I thought it sounded like Freebird, but now it doesn't.
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#13
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And for that ignorance, I'm never going to help you. Ever.



I was implying that he plays slap bass and lead....so he never uses chords

Also, I jsut met him, so he can't know much about my playing style can he>?
Play the man, Master Ridley; we shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
#14
uh i play slap bass and lead, and by no means do i not use chords.

do you know what an arpeggio is?
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#15
Quote by somethingcool76
uh i play slap bass and lead, and by no means do i not use chords.

do you know what an arpeggio is?



I'm talking about strumming patterns 0_o

Maybe he was trying to show me some specific song, I don't know
Play the man, Master Ridley; we shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
#16
Quote by kwside95
At first I thought it sounded like Freebird, but now it doesn't.

freebird is G Em F C D, in short

and thats just a generic chord progression. no particular song. if you watch the youtube thing abt pachelbel's canon, or the lesson on here abt chord progressions or whatever, it shows how a lot of different songs use the same style chord progressions.
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