#1
I currently own a '97 Ford Explorer XLT with the 5.0L V8 and AWD. It's worth about $5,000. It has 109,000 miles and runs flawlessly. It also gets 11mpg city and 18 mpg highway and is eating me alive.

I have come into the opportunity to buy a non-running C3 Corvette Stingray ('76 model) with about 55,000 miles for $2,000, which would leave me with $3,000 to get it running. (and hopefully paint it) I don't know exactly what's wrong with it, I should have that information when the seller calls me back tomorrow. I know it has a 350 motor, may or may not be original, but definitely not in it's original condition as it now produces 400 horsepower (does or would if running, I do not know). Anyway it would probably get better mileage than my current car (new these things got 16mpg city) and it's almost the car I've always wanted (I prefer the rear end and chrome bumpers on the 68-71 models).

Alright cut to the chase, anyone worked on cars this old before? Do you know what is likely wrong with it? Do you think I have enough money to make it run? How long would it take to make it run, I'm going to need to drive it back from college (Virginia Tech) to home (Miami). Any advice/warnings anyone could give me would be greatly appreciated, and I'll try to get more information about it up by tomorrow.
#2
you better find out if the motor will turn over. if not it's locked up and you will have to buy a new motor, which would cost you alot. i definately wouldn't buy it though. old cars like that get like 12 miles to the gallon city. it will probably be just as bad as your explorer.
#3
I don't really care about the mileage so long as it's not worse. I doubt that the motor's seized up since they listed the horsepower it generates as a selling point.

How hard is it to learn to drive stick? I've seen it done a lot and know how to do it in theory but I'm sure it takes a while to learn how to feather the clutch properly.
#4
that car is like my all time favorite...*drools* DO IT!! course im not a car mechanic guy, and gas is bloody expensive...so you may wanna make a more logical choice
"Music is moral law. It gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, a charm to sadness, and a gaiety and life to everything. It is the essence of order and leads to all that is good, true, and beautiful"
#5
no. motors are more than $2,000. a good paint job is $1,000.
I highly doubt it will be worth it.
Your MPG in an old Vette will be worse than a modern SUV.

Do what makes you happy, but I think buying a non-running bucket would be worthless.
$2k for a dead car isn't exactly a good deal...try $1k. then maybe we'll talk...

and even then u don't know how to drive stick. if you learn on the vette you'll probably **** up the tranny. which means more money.

it's up to you.
Last edited by FlyingFuc!< at Oct 25, 2007,
#6
Quote by RedSox_o4
you better find out if the motor will turn over. if not it's locked up and you will have to buy a new motor, which would cost you alot. i definately wouldn't buy it though. old cars like that get like 12 miles to the gallon city. it will probably be just as bad as your explorer.

You don't have to buy a new one, you'll have to overhaul it which is alot of work and it will require some knowledge of engine mechanics. But Chances are with an classic cars if they haven't already been restored then they probably won't turn over. As far as the money issue goes, that will probably be enough to get it scooting down the street but total restoration will take quite a bit more I'd say.
BTW stingray's are way cool and if you wanna put forth the time and effort it would be totally badass. I restored a 73 mustang and it was alot of work but it was alot of fun too. I think you should go for it but you might get somebody that know mechanics (if you don't) to steer you in the right direction.
#7
Yea my buddies dad has a 76 sting ray that hes put about 120 grand aftermarket into. Its ****ing BEAITIFUL, and it rips. He has everything on it, its the biggest smallblock you can get bored out as wide as it can go. It has nitrous, and a switch that locks the front tires up so you can roast the back ones. Hes only driven it like 6 times though, i think its a waste.

As for gas mileage i'd say it will be worse or close to the same
And before he died, Taran-Ish had scrawled upon the altar of chrysolite with coarse shaky strokes the sign of DOOM.
Last edited by deadmansdiary at Oct 25, 2007,
#8
I have some minor mechanical knowledge. I also have a family friend who is a brilliant mechanic who I could hire to do the work for me/with me. However to do this I would have to transport the car non running to Miami. That'll cost $600, maybe $500 if I look around. I might be able to borrow the money from my parents so that I could use my explorer to pull it back and save some money and then sell the ford there, but Uhaul won't rent any trailers to be pulled behind Explorers because they were taking a lot of flack for the trailers not having sway bars and flipping SUVs. (It has nothing to do with explorers, but it hurts their profits much less to stop renting to the car with a questionable history.)

Anyway I don't know of course, but I'm optimistic on the engine turning over since it's clearly been modified recently. Due to new emissions standards the 76 corvette produced under 200 horsepower stock. Even if seized, engines rarely need to be replaced, just rebuilt. So it'll probably turn over, but I might have to turn it by hand. I'm more worried about lots of other smaller problems, like wiring gone bad and stuff like that.

I have a friend who learned to drive stick in his pontiac vibe in a week. The transmission's fine.
#10
if youre looking at this car I would STRONGLY suggest bringing someone with you who knows about cars. theyll be able to tell you if its worth it. my guess its that it won't be. I used to work on corvettes and very rarely did I see older than 1980's in good shape. the main problem along with the motor will be the BODY. make sure its not a rust-bucket! I can't stress this enough. also make sure the transmission is in good order. I love these cars but sometimes you may have to let one go because it simply is not worth it. you decide.
Quote by sashki
A lot of pros do that: if they play a wrong note, they'll hit it again to make it look as if it's intentional. It's called "jazz", aparently.


Member #12 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#12
Quote by iplayfenders66
if youre looking at this car I would STRONGLY suggest bringing someone with you who knows about cars. theyll be able to tell you if its worth it. my guess its that it won't be. I used to work on corvettes and very rarely did I see older than 1980's in good shape. the main problem along with the motor will be the BODY. make sure its not a rust-bucket! I can't stress this enough. also make sure the transmission is in good order. I love these cars but sometimes you may have to let one go because it simply is not worth it. you decide.


The C3 corvette's body is 100% fiberglass. Rust free!

I still probably won't do it. A year from now though I'll live in a house instead of a dorm and probably have some more money, so maybe I can buy it (if it's still for sale) or another one and restore it over time myself and still have my reliable ford to get to class and haul stuff from home.

That said I'm still going to look into it. But I don't think It'll be practical unless I can get it to Miami. Or get it to a mechanic and have it ready to drive 3 weeks later. (That doesn't mean pretty, I can do that later)

Quote by FRDesign
A new Vette gets 28 MPG!


Oh what would do for one of those... They'll outperform just about every Ferrari for $70,000
Last edited by Blaster Bob at Oct 25, 2007,