#1
It has this "Tap" setting when in tuner mode that changes the "Hertz"...what is this for? I notice that it reacts differently when I adjust it. Also, it only ranges from 435-445 Hz.
#2
That will allow you to perform altered tunings on the guitar. Say you want to tune the whole thing a half step down. You re-adjust the tuner so that it's off by that half step, then tune the guitar to it. The needle will still stop at the zero mark, neither flat nor sharp, but the guitar will be a half step lower in tune. It's just a way of making it easier to tune to different tunings. It should tell you about doing that in the owners manual that came with the tuner, assuming you bought it new that is.
#3
ohhhh ok that makes a whole lot more sense than what the manual says. all it says is to use the tap buttons to adjust the value in tuning mode. One more thing though; is there a certain number I should be tuning it at to be at standard? I tried finding this online somewhere, but can't seem to find it. I guess it probably doesn't matter then.
#4
In the US, A is tuned to 440hz.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#5
Quote by LeftyDave
That will allow you to perform altered tunings on the guitar. Say you want to tune the whole thing a half step down. You re-adjust the tuner so that it's off by that half step, then tune the guitar to it. The needle will still stop at the zero mark, neither flat nor sharp, but the guitar will be a half step lower in tune. It's just a way of making it easier to tune to different tunings. It should tell you about doing that in the owners manual that came with the tuner, assuming you bought it new that is.

eh, i'm no expert on this but i don't think that's quite correct. 435-445 hz is just a pitch range for A. in the US we typically use 440 hz for A, but i think the international standard is 435 hz. i'm not sure what the 445 hz is for, but i assume it must be used somewhere as a performance standard tuning, whether in a different place or different time period. A# is more like 465 hz and Ab is around 415 hz.

of course this all depends on which octave you are referring to. there's an A440 and an A220 and an A880 etc. A440 is the A above middle C on a piano. this is the A guitar tuners and the like are set to.
#6
^^^Agreed. All of what you say is true, but for some of the cheaper electronic guitar tuners, they only incorporate the standard notes to tune the guitar to, EADGBe. In order to drop tune, or tune to altered tunings, they add in a feature that allow's you to drift the needle sweep one way or another. Some have a 1 cent accuracy, others 2. My Korg GA30 has the same function, but it's labeled as "Flat". If I want to tune everything down a half step, I simply shift the needle sweep over by the correct amount. When I then pluck the string on the guitar, I still zero the meter needle and watch for the green light, but I won't be at standard anymore, I'll actually be off by the amount I adjusted the meter to. I believe this is what the threadstarter is referring to, although I've never heard it called a "tap" function. Yes, A is still 440 Hz, until you change that setting on the tuner. Is this making any sense? I can do it easier than describe it.
#7
maybe we should ask what kind of tuner he is asking about?

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#8
Quote by LeftyDave
^^^Agreed. All of what you say is true, but for some of the cheaper electronic guitar tuners, they only incorporate the standard notes to tune the guitar to, EADGBe. In order to drop tune, or tune to altered tunings, they add in a feature that allow's you to drift the needle sweep one way or another. Some have a 1 cent accuracy, others 2. My Korg GA30 has the same function, but it's labeled as "Flat". If I want to tune everything down a half step, I simply shift the needle sweep over by the correct amount. When I then pluck the string on the guitar, I still zero the meter needle and watch for the green light, but I won't be at standard anymore, I'll actually be off by the amount I adjusted the meter to. I believe this is what the threadstarter is referring to, although I've never heard it called a "tap" function. Yes, A is still 440 Hz, until you change that setting on the tuner. Is this making any sense? I can do it easier than describe it.

Yeah, I believe I understand what you are saying. I was thinking that this isn't what the threadstarter has going on since his tuner only has the range to change between 435-445. That's not enough to change the pitch to actually tune to even a half step up or down.