#1
This may be blatantly obvious, but when figuring out the notes in a chord, say in C, is it easier to think of the notes in a chord as being the notes in C major, and then flatting the notes to get chords that vary from major? For example, I just tend to count up and add the note as I go up to 7ths and beyond, but when building a C#7, I would get A# as the b7th, but shouldn't it be Bb, as to keep it in "key", though they are the same note? Or am I just making it too difficult for myself?
Schecter Loomis
LTD Horizon
Ibanez RGA121
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Quote by emagdnimasisiht
haha
This is the funniest thing i've ever read on UG.
lespaulrocks39, you sir are awesome.
#2
dont count up in sharps, its confusing. . to go the note in the scale (in C, there are no flats or sharps, as you know)... then alter it. dont count up, then figure out what youre supposed to call it, and completely flip the alteration... thats too confusing.


also, for chords, its always easier to just count up in thirds (C E G B.... if you want the b7, just flat the B).

basically, dont do any more of that "counting up" that you were talking about lol... you are definitely making it a lot harder than it really is, lol.
#3
Yeah, I took lessons off and on for a while, and though I didn't cover much theory, I recall getting my ass ripped for taking too long to figure out intervals and chords/arpeggios. Does the B and E having no sharps affect counting up in 3rds?
Schecter Loomis
LTD Horizon
Ibanez RGA121
Marshall DSL100
Peavey 5150

Quote by emagdnimasisiht
haha
This is the funniest thing i've ever read on UG.
lespaulrocks39, you sir are awesome.
#4
Quote by lespaulrocks39
Does the B and E having no sharps affect counting up in 3rds?


no, the intervals are all still thirds... note that we are just counting up by thirds in general, so it doesnt matter if theyre major or minor thirds. after counting up in thirds, you make the necessary alterations to make the chord you want. say you want to make a C minor seven chord out of those notes (C E G B)... since that is, in its natural state, a C major seven, you just lower the third and seven by one half step to make the chord a minor seven.... and the result is: C Eb G Bb. does that make sense?
#5
just to clarify, C#7 isn't in the key of C.

I dont think you thought it was, it just reads a little funny because we were talking about the Key of C.

i think the first 'respondee' presumed you meant C7, which requires a b7. correctly saying this is Bb...

...but the C#7 chord you mentioned is obviously 1 half tone higher than that and therefore the b7 would be B. Because the 7th degree of C# is B#.

hope that helped, sorry if it only confused
#6
Yeah, everything is clarified now, originally I was asking about a Cdom7 chord, not C7 in the key of C#, but thanks for the help, it'll definitely save me some time.
Schecter Loomis
LTD Horizon
Ibanez RGA121
Marshall DSL100
Peavey 5150

Quote by emagdnimasisiht
haha
This is the funniest thing i've ever read on UG.
lespaulrocks39, you sir are awesome.
#7
In a scale, you can't repeat the same note name twice. That's why a C# scale has E# instead of just going C# D# F F# G# etc.
So for this reason, your scale degrees will always land on the same note of the key. A 7th scale degree in C will always be a B, no matter if it's natural, sharp, double flatted, whatever. So if you need to modify a note of the chord, write out the scale and then count until you get to the note you need to change.