#4
^ pretty much said it there, ex....
e --------------------------
B ---------------------------
G --------------------------
D --------------------- 6 ---
A --- 4 ---5 --- 6 --- 4 ---
E --- 2 -- 3 --- 4 ---------- etc, etc.....
#8
Donpit, it's pretty much a chord made of two notes. Try playing these two power chords:
------------------
------------------
------------------
------------------
--7-----5--------
--5-----3--------

They sound pretty good, don't they? They're useful for rock and rythm. They're used a lot, and chances are, you've probably used them or played one before if you play a lot of tabs from your favorite bands. Another variation is where you add another note below the second one:

------------------
------------------
------------------
---7-------5-----
---7-------5-----
---5-------3-----

They are not technically chords because they only use two notes. Yes, the ones I just wrote technically only use two notes because the 3rd note played is the same note as the first note played, except one octave higher. Example: look at the very last power chord I wrote: the 3rd fret on the 6th string is a G note, and the 5th fret onthe 4th string is also a G note, except one octave higher.

But you don't have to worry about all of that yet. Just have fun with the power chords ! There are some relatively easy songs that use these, like Somewhere Down on Fullerton from Allister. This song also has a very easy solo, so have fun with it.
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#9
As said, power chords (aka '5' chords eg: B5) contain the root note and the 5th of the major scale. They most commonly have the root note on the E or A string and appear like this:

-x-x-x-x-
-x-x-x-x-
-x-x-4-6-
-3-5-4-6-
-3-5-2-4-
-1-3-x-x-


These (above) contain the root note, the fifth and then a second root note an octave higher. Power chords with only one root note dont sound as full but you can change from one to another more quickly. The look like this:

-x-x-x-x-
-x-x-x-x-
-x-x-x-x-
-x-x-7-6-
-8-9-5-4-
-6-7-x-x-


You can change from one to another even quicker when youre playing in a dropped tuning. Power chords in a dropped tuning will look like this in tab form:

-x-x-x-
-x-x-x-
-x-x-x-
-4-6-8-
-4-6-8-
-4-6-8-
#10
Quote by tom183
As said, power chords (aka '5' chords eg: B5) contain the root note and the 5th of the major scale. They most commonly have the root note on the E or A string and appear like this:

-x-x-x-x-
-x-x-x-x-
-x-x-4-6-
-3-5-4-6-
-3-5-2-4-
-1-3-x-x-


These (above) contain the root note, the fifth and then a second root note an octave higher. Power chords with only one root note dont sound as full but you can change from one to another more quickly. The look like this:

-x-x-x-x-
-x-x-x-x-
-x-x-x-x-
-x-x-7-6-
-8-9-5-4-
-6-7-x-x-


You can change from one to another even quicker when youre playing in a dropped tuning. Power chords in a dropped tuning will look like this in tab form:

-x-x-x-
-x-x-x-
-x-x-x-
-4-6-8-
-4-6-8-
-4-6-8-


Yeah, that's all true and a good explanation, but I don't think he knows about major scales and intervals yet if he is just starting with power chords, so the "root and 5th of a major scale" may mean nothing to him.

Everything after that was good though lol .
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