#1
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/m/manic_street_preachers/a_design_for_life_btab.htm


Hi

Im really confused about which key the Manic Street preachers play this song. Normally I can pick up which key a song is in pretty easily, but this one has a lot of unexpected and strange chord changes, with loads of major and minor 7ths. Then the key seems to completely change in the pre chorus and chorus. How does he keep the song flowing and sounding great, but by changing to completely diefferent chord progressions throughout the song? Sorry if this is confusing.

The verse chords are:

Cmaj7, Dm7/9, Gmaj7, Ebmaj7, Cmaj7

Pre Chorus

Dm, G, Dm, G
Dm, D#5, E, Am
Fsus2

Chorus:
Am, G5, F#5, F x 2
Fsus 2

Feedback would be great thanks
#3
In one word - Cmaj.

But they using Ebmaj7 in verse, which makes felling, like key has changed to Bb major for a moment. Emaj chord before chorus is dominant chord for Am in harmonic traid (All in Cmaj key).
"That was it, a nick. Now happily paid for. [...] It was decided that it was so far away in time and influence that...well, you only get caught when you're successful. That's the game". Robert Plant
#4
Quote by browar
In one word - Cmaj.

But they using Ebmaj7 in verse, which makes felling, like key has changed to Bb major for a moment. Emaj chord before chorus is dominant chord for Am in harmonic traid (All in Cmaj key).


Bb major... not!

C Minor/Eb Major, you know, borrowing chords from parallel minor.
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#6
Solution!

But Ebmaj7 chord is in a C Minor scale.
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#7
Quote by the_guy
i dont quite understand, there isnt a c minor in the song :s


It's a common compositional tool to 'borrow' chords from the parallel minor.

So C Majors parallel minor is C minor. So In addition to the C major chords, you can borrow chords from C minor. Which is where the Eb chord is coming from in your example

This can be used for any parallel mode as well, another common use is to have a piece in say C major and also add chords derived from C mixolydian. This is called a modal interchange
#8
^thanks so much guys, but as long as you mainly use the chords from c major with the occasonal parralel minor chord then it will all sound good right?
#9
^Sure, it's all subjective/up to your ears anyways in terms of what sounds good to you...just experiment with borrowing different chords, study songs you like, and have fun with it

edit:
Pre Chorus

Dm, G, Dm, G
Dm, D#5, E, Am
Fsus2

Chorus:
Am, G5, F#5, F x 2
Fsus 2

Ok so you know whats going on in the verse now...the pre chorus has chromatic movement from Dm-D#5-E. Then E moves to Am which is a perfect cadence in Am

Then the chorus stays in Am, using a chromatic walkdown from G-F#-F which is similar to the movement in While my Guitar Gently Weeps (Beatles)
Last edited by Stash Jam at Oct 25, 2007,
#10
^cheers man, i just wanted to make sure if i am going to have a wierd chord change, that i use it in the appropriate way
#11
cool, I just edited my last post too to show whats going on in the rest of the tune
#12
solo 1
e----------------------------------------
B----------------------------------------
G----------------------------------------
D-15-15-15-15-13-15-15-15-15-13-15-13-15-
A----------------------------------------
E----------------------------------------


solo 2
e-----------------------------------|
B-----------------------------------|
G-----------------------------------|
D-15-13-----------------------------|
A-------15-14-13--13-13----13-------|
E-----------------------16----16-13-|


hi, sorry, but im looking at another song (girl by stereophonics) and these two solos are used over the chords Fmaj, G#maj and A#maj
the notes F, G# and A# are all part of F minor, and the solos look to be in f minor as well, but the all the chords are major? how does it all fit? :s sorry!
#13
Quote by Stash Jam
cool, I just edited my last post too to show whats going on in the rest of the tune



thanks man, very helpful stuff, the chromatic rundown is just to build tension and give it a more interesting feel right?


ps guys please help with me with myother question, thanks very much =]
#14
G#M and A#M are both part of D# major scale.
You can look on F Major chord as secondary dominant of A#.

First solo has G# and A# notes repeating.

Second seems like F# Blues scale (notes: F G# A# B C D#).

If anything isn't clear, RTFS!
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#16
Quote by the_guy
solo 1
e----------------------------------------
B----------------------------------------
G----------------------------------------
D-15-15-15-15-13-15-15-15-15-13-15-13-15-
A----------------------------------------
E----------------------------------------


solo 2
e-----------------------------------|
B-----------------------------------|
G-----------------------------------|
D-15-13-----------------------------|
A-------15-14-13--13-13----13-------|
E-----------------------16----16-13-|


hi, sorry, but im looking at another song (girl by stereophonics) and these two solos are used over the chords Fmaj, G#maj and A#maj
the notes F, G# and A# are all part of F minor, and the solos look to be in f minor as well, but the all the chords are major? how does it all fit? :s sorry!


Fmaj - Abmaj - Bbmaj

Since this is revolving around the F chord, perhaps the best way to look at it is as a
I bIII IV in F...(you could also look at the Ab as coming from F minor, basically two different ways of looking at it that take you to the same place)

The first solo is only 2 notes - F and Eb The second solo is the F Blues scale

Essentially, playing a minor or blues scale over a major chord progression lends itself to a grittier/bluesy sound as opposed to playing the major scale over the progression

Plus with the Abmaj chord in the mix, you have the notes Ab C Eb which are all included in the F blues scale


edit to Darthie
Quote by DarTHie
G#M and A#M are both part of D# major scale.
You can look on F Major chord as secondary dominant of A#.

First solo has G# and A# notes repeating.

Second seems like F# Blues scale (notes: F G# A# B C D#).

If anything isn't clear, RTFS!



You have the notes wrong on the 1st solo, it's F and Eb.
The second solo is the F blues Scale (which you spelled out incorrectly as well, there are no sharps in the F blues scale)
F major wouldn't be a secondary dominant here, it's the tonic.
Why use D# instead of Eb to explain anything to someone who doesn't know much theory? Especially when this is all based around F? It just seems odd that you're giving this incorrect information and just telling people to RTFS, ya know?
Last edited by Stash Jam at Oct 25, 2007,