#1
A friend of mine and I have been playing to build a guitar for some time now, and are designs are currently finished. However, today, this friend of mine named Dawson (not that part actually matters) brought up a point to me: what's the point of the fretboard? He is a carpenter (I'm the musician), and I couldn't produce an answer, and he believes it would be easier for him to build the neck with the fretboard built out of the same piece of wood.


Which leads me to ask, is there a reason why companies do this? What's the benefit of having a separate piece of wood as a fretboard on top of the neck?
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
#2
Isn't it so the truss rod can be installed easily? Or is that what the skunk stripe thing is for....
Quote by Jearl

...dont play Fender just because its Fender.

Gear:
Ibanez SZ520QM
Peavey Rotor EXP
Squier Bullet (heavily modified)
Mesa Roadster Head & 2x12 cab
#3
Not all guitars have the skunk stripe though, the fretboard is basically a flexible layer between the strings and the neck which allows the trussrod and neck to bend more easily
ohai little sig.
#4
Quote by CM_X5
Isn't it so the truss rod can be installed easily? Or is that what the skunk stripe thing is for....



if that's true, I must point out we plan to build a neck through.
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
#5
The trussrod thing depends on the guitar really, not really sure what the difference would be, only thinI can think of is the feel of the fret board, but there has to be a better reason for them to use seperate wood..
#6
The fretboard strengthens the neck. I'ts common for the wood to 'move' over time... or more commonly called a warped/twisted neck. So by having the neck AND the fretboard, it won't warp as easily. This happens since both peices react differently, so when one peice will tend to warp, the other one will hold it in place.

Lutherie school rocks!
#7
maybe it's simply for cosmetics ?
there are one piece maple necks used quite often on strats...
i don't think it's for any other reason than cosmetics and the (small) sound difference.
#8
It can be cosmetic or functional. You could have an average looking peice of maple for the neck, a headstock veneer with a matching fretboard and it would look much better than just a boring old maple neck. Different fretboard woods can give different tones, as well as different feels. Not to mention that some neck woods aren't all that cut out to be a fretboard wood.

Now, you can use a 1 peice neck, but you'll need to route a slot in the back so you can put in the truss rod. But I've never heard of a 1 peice neck-thru neck.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#9
its for the stability, and so that the truss rod can be installed easily, i don't think it was really designed for cosmetic reasons, but it kinda just ended up like that, thats my guess.