#1
I recently (as in ten minutes ago) bought a five string Ibanez. I've been playing bass on a four string for almost two years now, so I'm finding it kind of hard in hitting the right string. I'm a righty, and for some strange reason I move my right thumb everytime I change strings, as oppose to planting my thumb on the pick-up. So I end up hitting all the strings when I try and change. Are there any tips to helping with this, or do I just need to practice? Sorry if my post wandered a bit, and was hard to read. Thanks.
#2
Try using rest strokes. They are when you keep your thumb planted on either the body of the bass or the pick-up and pull your finger all the way through the string you intend on hitting and keep goin until you hit the next string. If you do it right it will mute the string behind it. This will take practice, but it is very handy. Of course if you get really good at it you wont really need to rest on those other strings.
#3
Sorry, it's tough to explain. Try to youtube it. It's a classical guitar skill but it works very similar on bass.
#5
i recently was in the same position, just keep practicing, you get used to it.
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#7
Try to keep your right hand still and use your thumb as a pivot point. For me, that 5th string had 0 learning curve, as to me it was 'under' everything else and therefore not in my way. Now that you have a 5-string, you can start seeing patterns in scales and stuff like that, since you have 2 octaves in any given hand position.
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#8
Yeah just keep practicing. The big difference between four and five strings is the string spacing so it's normal when you first do the switch that you need to take the time to adapt to that change of spacing.
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#9
Quote by thefitz
Try to keep your right hand still and use your thumb as a pivot point. For me, that 5th string had 0 learning curve, as to me it was 'under' everything else and therefore not in my way. Now that you have a 5-string, you can start seeing patterns in scales and stuff like that, since you have 2 octaves in any given hand position.

its not the 5th sting that has the learning curve, its the fact that the others are closer together
The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.
#10
Quote by The Evil Hat
its not the 5th sting that has the learning curve, its the fact that the others are closer together


Actually, string spacing on a lot of fivers (in my experience anyway), are not much different from four strings. I think the problem is as you look at your bass, you see the B string as the E string, because you're used to sweeping through to nothing on the E string. When you pick up a fiver, you now have that extra thumbrest you're sweeping into
#11
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Actually, string spacing on a lot of fivers (in my experience anyway), are not much different from four strings. I think the problem is as you look at your bass, you see the B string as the E string, because you're used to sweeping through to nothing on the E string. When you pick up a fiver, you now have that extra thumbrest you're sweeping into

maybe, im fairly sure they're closer (at least on mine), but i could be wrong, and the new string can be tough at first. i meant its not tough when you want to play it, not that you'll never acidently hit it.

and TS, once you play for a while you wont be able to go back, i picked up my 4-string and it felt really limited,
The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.
#12
Thanks for helping ,everyone. I'm going to try all the tips suggested, as well as just practising.
#13
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Actually, string spacing on a lot of fivers (in my experience anyway), are not much different from four strings. I think the problem is as you look at your bass, you see the B string as the E string, because you're used to sweeping through to nothing on the E string. When you pick up a fiver, you now have that extra thumbrest you're sweeping into


Because theres that extra thumbrest, I find it alot easier to play because my fingers aren't being pulled all the way back, they're hitting my B string, and also I can play much faster due to the string spacing, you're right, it's not much different, but it's kinda subtle, but enough to make a huge difference to my playing...I Idon't intend on going to four ever again...I love five's.

Edit: To the TS, you'll get it soon, it doesn't take as long as you might think, and you'll be able to switch between them pretty seamlessly soon. Good luck
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#15
Quote by Canadian_basser
I recently (as in ten minutes ago) bought a five string Ibanez. I've been playing bass on a four string for almost two years now, so I'm finding it kind of hard in hitting the right string. I'm a righty, and for some strange reason I move my right thumb everytime I change strings, as oppose to planting my thumb on the pick-up. So I end up hitting all the strings when I try and change. Are there any tips to helping with this, or do I just need to practice? Sorry if my post wandered a bit, and was hard to read. Thanks.


arrrgh thad be why i changed to me five after but 1 year
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---------------------------5------8-----7-
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#17
For me the biggest change was muting strings. I got into the (fairly good) habit of muting the strings that I wasn't using below the ones I was with my third finger. I rested my ring finger on the E and bent it down to the A to touch my knuckle so I get no sympathetic vibrations or unwanted noise of any kind. Now with the fiver it's been a big adjustment.