#1
Delete
Guitar:
Floyd Rose discovery series 3 (with speed loader bridge)
Gibson Les paul studio
Pedals:
Zoom G2.1U pedal
Amps:
vox valvetronix 50 watt
Dean "stack in a box" headphone amp
Last edited by unforgiven_hope at Sep 7, 2017,
#2
just play it RIDICULOUSLY slow.

another thing a lot of guitarists do is when switching chords is hit open string or muted strings right before switching chords.

finally, look at your left hand and see where you don't have to move fingers when switching chords. such as a C to an A minor 7, all you do is lift your ring finger, you don't have to rearrange your entire hand.

good luck! just remember it'll take you some time, but you'll get it.
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#3
just practice switching in and out of random order and playing around with diffrent chords.
Sliding, switching between octive, and power chords, bar chords, full chords. just do it slow at first. then speed up.
it just takes time and practice
#4
start of with two chords and get really good switching between the two...i started with A and E... then add another chord... i believe my third was D. get good switching between them randomly, add another.. C for me... and repeat the process, add another chord, repeat. add another chord, repeat.
#5
It's the reply that no-one likes to hear, but couldn't be anymore true.

practice, practice again, then practice abit more.

sorry dude but your problems can all be solved with good ol' practice.
#6
Quote by TonyRandall
start of with two chords and get really good switching between the two...i started with A and E... then add another chord... i believe my third was D. get good switching between them randomly, add another.. C for me... and repeat the process, add another chord, repeat. add another chord, repeat.
This approach worked well for me. Still took a ton of repetition, but it's a good method. As the previous poster stated, there's no shortcut to good ol' practice.
#7
delete
Guitar:
Floyd Rose discovery series 3 (with speed loader bridge)
Gibson Les paul studio
Pedals:
Zoom G2.1U pedal
Amps:
vox valvetronix 50 watt
Dean "stack in a box" headphone amp
Last edited by unforgiven_hope at Sep 7, 2017,
#8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LL-QD0kZqA8

Somewhere in this series of videos, John Petrucci has a set of 'warm up exercises' based around arpeggiated (each note played individually) chords that will help you improve the independence and dexterity of each finger in your left hand.

Start out slooooow, and just focus on the chords that are spaced apart by one fret for each finger, at least at first. It'll sound awful, but it will build the strength in your left hand to help you in other aspects of your playing.

Other than that, just carry on switching between simple open chords and barre chords *cleanly*. There's no particular magical technique. After all, in the end, all you're doing is coordinating pressing your fingers down on some strings. The only way to gain that co-ordination is through practice, practice, practice.
#9
Quote by unforgiven_hope
yes I kow this. I actually was hoping to get a series of chords to practice changing that would be more effective than the one I would choose.



Didn't mean to sound so blunt. lol sorry...

The way i got over this problem, (which was a big problem at first ) was by learning nice easy songs that use just the open chords. It's far more fun this way and will also embedd lots of nice chord transistions that you will come across time and time again in other tunes.

It's not as 'routine' as a specific set of chords to practice. but i dare say this will be more beneficial.
#11
play very slowly, and switch between random chords. as you go on, play a little bit faster each time so its still challenging, but not too challenging. eventually you'll have it. thats how i learned.

Jack my swag