#1
The mics being:
2 Samson Q7's <Bass Drum and Toms?
Shure SM57 <Snare+Hi-hat?
Samson C-01 (Condenser) <Overhead?

Where would I put the mics on the drumkit? They are going into a Yamaha MG 8-2 FX Mixer and then into a Tascam DP-01FX.

I've added where I think they should be put. Is that ok?

Cheers
Last edited by soundcheck1 at Oct 27, 2007,
#2
try and track down another overhead I reckon. but yeah what you've got sounds like a good start. try and get your overhead(s) to sound good first and then add in the others.

be careful about phase cancellation. just listen.
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#4
Be very careful about using that samson mic on the bass drum, you may end up getting a **** sound and damaging the mic, that is why there are specialist bass drum mics designed to pick the frequencies.
#5
Quote by hmmm_de_hum
Be very careful about using that samson mic on the bass drum, you may end up getting a **** sound and damaging the mic, that is why there are specialist bass drum mics designed to pick the frequencies.


They aren't necessarily designed for the frequencies as much as the high sound pressure levels from the bass drum, for example the AKG D112 can handle up to a 160 db SPL.
#6
Yeah im just making a point that he cant expect a decent sound from the mic he's using for the bass drum, ive found that when recording with only limited equipment especially for a bass drum (we have used the D112 in the past and struggled to get it sounding good with our kick sound) try and midi trigger it so you can have full control over the sound that is comming through on the mix.
#7
The SM57 for the bass drum then? There is some fast double bass stuff we are going to record so the bass drum needs to sound clear in the mix? I can't afford to buy more mics so it will have to be one of the 4 I have!

Cheers
#9
Quote by soundcheck1
Phase cancellation?


just try not to aim two mikes at each other when recording the same instrument.
otherwise the two sounds could be combined and if they are out of phase with each other - cancel each other out and you'll have a crappy thin sound.

I think that explains it.

if you have time, just keep experimenting until you get it to sound decent.
try moving the mics, switching them around, try tuning the drums differently etc.

you should spend more time getting it to sound right than actually recording.
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#11
Just make sure you've got the bass drum tuned properly, and if you can get the mic right inside of the bass drum itself. Sometimes you may need more than one mic to get the desired sound (One inside, One Outside Front, One Outside aimed at the beater. Remember that you will probably end up EQing the sound later.
#13
I'd go behringer C-2 stereo pair cuz its only $99AU for 2 mikes. cheap as. and I've read a good review on them (price/quality trade off). its a good place to start anyways.
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