#2
Well... in theory, you find out which notes are played through the song (dismantle the chords into individual notes) and see which scale they fit into. It's quicker, though, to just run your finger up and down on the E string, find a note that seems to fit the song, and that's most likely it.
I'm a communist. Really.
#5
Yer it is normaly the first note or chord in the song but on the times when it not you can look at the solos that would be the easiest time to fit the song into a scale pattern
#6
Quote by Raziel2p
Well... in theory, you find out which notes are played through the song (dismantle the chords into individual notes) and see which scale they fit into. It's quicker, though, to just run your finger up and down on the E string, find a note that seems to fit the song, and that's most likely it.


Also be sure to make sure that the note feels like it's the 'place of rest', like it sounds like the song could 'resolve' on that note/chord.

For example, if you're playing something simple like Wild Thing with the A, D and E chords (look up the tab if you need to)... see what happens when you just stop on the E or D chords. Hear that 'suspended', 'hanging' feeling, that suggests you need to continue to the A before stopping? That's a sign that the A is the root, or the key the song is being played in.
#7
Quote by Nugi
How can I learn what key a song is in?


Usually the first note tells the whole story. Then it's just a matter of finding out where the sharps and flats are. For example W-W-W-H-W etc. (W = whole step, H=half step) That's how I do it. Everyone is different.