#1
Okay, so this is probably a stupid question, but I have no idea how to jam with my band. We can plays covers or whatever, but when someone suggests, hey, let's just jam around, I falter a bit. It's just that, our bassist will start a little riff, and I'll play the chords to it, but then he changes, and I have to figure out what he's playing to adapt, and my other guitarist doesn't really get in on it because he doesn't know theory. How should we go about jamming?
Fender '72 Telecaster Deluxe Reissue -> Korg Pitchblack Tuner -> Boss PS-5 -> EHX Big Muff -> MXR EVH Phase 90 -> Menatone Pleasure Trem 5000 -> Line 6 Verbzilla -> MXR Carbon Copy -> Boss RC-2 -> Peavey Classic 50
#3
But even then, there's 7 notes in one key, and since the bassist started it it's kind of at his will to change them.
Fender '72 Telecaster Deluxe Reissue -> Korg Pitchblack Tuner -> Boss PS-5 -> EHX Big Muff -> MXR EVH Phase 90 -> Menatone Pleasure Trem 5000 -> Line 6 Verbzilla -> MXR Carbon Copy -> Boss RC-2 -> Peavey Classic 50
#4
you could just play a blues progression and jam to that
"Notes are expensive. . .use them wisely"-B.B. King

"It's been very important throughout my career that I've met all the guys I've copied, because at each stage they've said, 'Don't play like me, play like you."-Eric Clapton
#6
1st. the bassist should stick to a chord progression. Once you're all in the same chord progression you can take turns on melodies.

When i jam the chords hardly ever get changed. So basically you either make something up, or play some song's progression. I personally like jamming to simple progressions and in minor keys. eg. Am G D
Jamming is also mostly improv so theory helps a lot unless you've got a really good ear
#7
when your just jamming, dont change the chord progression, keep it going.


you can tell the bassist he can make changes to what he is playing and how, like add more notes here, less there, play quietly, louder, faster slower whatever, but the basic chord progression, timing, and rhythm should remain the same.

then after you get that part all worked out, you can agree on what the change should be, then jam that for a while.


soon everyone will have figured out what sounds the best when, and presto, youve written an original song
#8
Come up with a chord progression and have your bassist ALWAYS play the root of the current chord on the first beat of the measure. He can go bippidy bippidy bop all over the neck as he pleases after that, just make him keep to the progression.

Have your 2nd guitarist (assuming he doesn't know scales very well) play root-fifth-octave power chords or full chords (with no distortion) keeping to the chord progression.

Then you as a guitarist can do what you want. Though it sounds nice to adhere to the same principles that the bassist is and play the root or a root 5th chord on the first beat of the measure.
#9
With that extra guitarist things can be hard to mesh together, but i disagree with staying in one chord progression the whole time. Me and my friends just kind of start with something small and slowly let it evolve into other things, and our best songs are created that way.