#1
if I turn my amp up more than half way I get massive feedback and I can't seem to figure out why.. any suggestions?
Holden Caulfield is a friend of mine.
We go drinking from time to time.
#2
You're standing too close?
You're pickups aren't potted?
Bad cable/ amp?

Quote by emad
jthm_guitarist
Warned for trolling!


Quote by metal4eva_22
Didn't you say that you had a stuffed fox that you would occasionally fuck?

Quote by Axelfox
It's not a fox,it's a wolf.
#4
could be the ****ty cable... turn the treble down a bit, mess around with your pickups, i doont know what else it ocould be? like the other guy said, you might be standing too close
#5
It means coated in wax. If you boil some parafin wax and soak your pickup in it, it will eliminate microphonic feedback.

Quote by emad
jthm_guitarist
Warned for trolling!


Quote by metal4eva_22
Didn't you say that you had a stuffed fox that you would occasionally fuck?

Quote by Axelfox
It's not a fox,it's a wolf.
#7
What kind of feedback? Is it:
1) A Hendrix-y sustaining sound
2) A painful high-pitched squeal?

The first one (harmonic feedback) is common at high gain or volume levels, and can be controlled to some extent by where you stand in relation to to the amp (ie so the pickups face away). Also, try lowering the gain a little bit or taking down the trebles.

The second type (microphonic feedback) is common with unpotted pickups - basically little tiny metal parts vibrate together inside the pickup and cause feedback. It can be dealt with in the same way as harmonic feedback, but if it still persists I suggest new pickups - some Epiphone stock pickups suffer from microphonics quite badly.
If you really like the sound of your current p/ups you can wax-pot them yourself,which isn't as difficult as it sounds...
#8
maybe its your pedals?
i remember i had a show and i got mad feedback cuz one of my pedals just reacted weirdly...it only stopped when i turned it off...but it turns out it was a non noise free cable
#9
Quote by Shredxmyheart
if I turn my amp up more than half way I get massive feedback and I can't seem to figure out why.. any suggestions?


That's just because your amp isn't meant to handle that much volume and gain Lower the gain when you turn it up. Otherwise, your amp will be squealing like a pig. How many watts is your amp?
#10
Quote by Alienguitar
That's just because your amp isn't meant to handle that much volume and gain Lower the gain when you turn it up. Otherwise, your amp will be squealing like a pig. How many watts is your amp?


umm.. not sure.. maybe like 120..


How exactly do you pot your pick ups?
Holden Caulfield is a friend of mine.
We go drinking from time to time.
#11
Quote by Shredxmyheart
umm.. not sure.. maybe like 120..


How exactly do you pot your pick ups?


What do you mean? "Pot" your pick ups?
#12
Quote by Alienguitar
What do you mean? "Pot" your pick ups?



someone suggested that it was because my pickups aren't potted.. so.. how do I get them potted
Holden Caulfield is a friend of mine.
We go drinking from time to time.
#13
Basically take 'em out and make a double boiler, like you'd use when melting chocolate or whatever. A tincan floating in a pan of boiling water will do the job fine. It's wiser to use an electric stove since wax can be highly flammable when melted.

Get yourself some paraffin wax or beeswax - better still, a 70/30 mixture of the two - and pack them in the can. Aim to fill it most of the way up so there's plenty of liquid to submerge your pickup.



Once the wax is totally melted, put rubber bands around each pickup to keep the wrapping cloth secure, like this:
If there's a cover on your pickup it's best to leave it on.

Then it's simply a case of submerging your pickup in the wax and leaving it there until the wax has penetrated the coils. I'd give it an hour or so, though if you still see little bubbles escaping you should leave it longer. To fish it out you can tie a piece of string round it; I just use the conductor wires, but I'd recommend using string anyway.

NOTE: It's important that the wax isn't too hot as that can damage the pickup. A maximum temperature of 150° should ensure no harm comes to it. I usually just wing it, but I'd strongly suggest you use a meat thermometer anyway to be on the safe side.

Once the pickup's been in for a while, as long as there are no bubbles escaping you can remove it, and then immediately wipe off the excess wax with a paper towel. This can be very hot so take care!
After it's had a few minutes to cool, it's ready to be soldered back into your guitar!

Hope this is of use to you....
#14
Lol Guys your missing this here.

He said his amp is 120 watts! If hes turning it past 5, then It is going to be Extremely Loud. If you are like even 8 feet away from it you can get a ton of feedback. Volumes that loud are meant to be used on stages, not in bedrooms. But if being far away dont fix it, then its probably just crap pickups, or crap amp.