#1
a thing i don't get is, how come that say, a strat and tele sound so damn different ?
i mean, they're both alder, maple neck...

ah, the pickups, i hear you say ! but then why do people buy a tele for the sound because the sound of the strat they have doesn't cut it anymore, if you can simply put in different pickups for the tele sound ?

the answer is probably super obvious... thanks for an explanation !!
#2
Well, the pickups have different shaped bobbins, for one thing. Changes the inductance, I believe.

Then, a Tele has a metal plate behind the bridge pickup, which really gives it that twang that it's known for.
And Tele pickups don't fit in a Strat. The bridge pickup mounts very differently. Oh, and I'd say the different types of bridges makes a difference, too.
#4
It's all to do with resonance. No two pieces of wood are going to be identical even if it is the same type of wood. Between a stratocaster and a telecaster, the design is different so it is going to sound different even with same type of wood. The different sizes/dimensions of the wood will all affect the guitars resonance as well as the different positions of the guitars hardware.
#6
Two pieces of wood wont be identical indeed, unless there cut from the same tree. That said, the shape of a guitar also affects tone. For example, you can get a pretty good Dimebag Darrel tone out of a Gibson Explorer (with the proper pickups obviously), because the wood is ''flat'' and spaced out. A Gibson Les Paul on the other hand has a way bigger thickness in wood, and more of a round, conserved shape and would thus deliver a different tone.
#7
A strat and tele pickups have different guage wire, different bobbins, different magnets (I'm not sure. I think they were both originally Alnico 5).

And people buy strats and teles because they want 2 different guitars, maybe?
If you had a strat for a long time, but now you want a tele, you're probably gonna hang on to the guitar you've grown up with and are used to.

Quote by forsaknazrael
^I don't agree with some of that. I think the shape has little to do with it. I've heard great Tele tone from guitars that were not shaped like one, but had the same pickup layout and hardware.


It's not so much the shape as the type of wood and thickness. That's why a 6cm thick les paul is so dark and fat, while a shallow SG is more biting, although they have the same pickups.
#8
Quote by forsaknazrael
^I don't agree with some of that. I think the shape has little to do with it. I've heard great Tele tone from guitars that were not shaped like one, but had the same pickup layout and hardware.


I agree hardware has a big effect but the fundamentals of a guitar is the wood, it's the wood that resonates, and different shapes and sizes of wood will resonate differently.
#9
^Well, I never said the type of wood doesn't affect it...

Quote by JaeSwift
Two pieces of wood wont be identical indeed, unless there cut from the same tree. That said, the shape of a guitar also affects tone. For example, you can get a pretty good Dimebag Darrel tone out of a Gibson Explorer (with the proper pickups obviously), because the wood is ''flat'' and spaced out. A Gibson Les Paul on the other hand has a way bigger thickness in wood, and more of a round, conserved shape and would thus deliver a different tone.

The thickness affects it to a degree...But I wouldn't say the shape of it does. That's just silly. If you were trying to get a Dimebag tone, the best way would be to plug into the right amp.

I can get a good LP tone out of my SG, albeit, the neck tone is a bit brighter, as a SG';s neck pickup is a bit further from the neck, as compared to an LP.
#10
Just about everything makes a difference. The points already mentioned, plus there is a differenfce between maple and rosewood fretboards, adler, maple, mahogany and ash all sound different, how much wood is routed away for the pickup cavity, different pickups sound different, even from one single coil/humbucker to the next, a 250K volume or tone pot makes a great difference compared to a 500K, body mass, scale length, strings, amp, effects, bridge, nut, even you playing it may sound different than me playing it would. About the only thing that doesn't affect sound is the strap, and I'm not entirely certain of that...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#12
Quote by Paleo Pete
About the only thing that doesn't affect sound is the strap, and I'm not entirely certain of that...

You haven't tried Dunlop Straps™

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Quote by forsaknazrael
The LP has a thicker neck tone because of the pickup placement, actually.

O rly? They're the same scale length, same number of frets...The pickup on an SG is, like, 1cm away from the neck. Does that make all the difference?
#13
ah ok this cleared some up for me

but then, how come an SG and LP sounds so different, although they have the same wood, fretboard, and pickups (most of the times) even the same headstock and neck shape ??
#15
Quote by forsaknazrael



The thickness affects it to a degree...But I wouldn't say the shape of it does. That's just silly


The shape DOES have an effect actually. If you have the same thickness of wood for two guitars, but one guitars body was square and the other strat shaped, do you really think it will sound the same? More wood means more resonance, so the shape DOES have an effect. If the overall mass of the guitar is the same but the shapes are different, then maybe not so.
#17
Quote by XtAsY2007
The shape DOES have an effect actually. If you have the same thickness of wood for two guitars, but one guitars body was square and the other strat shaped, do you really think it will sound the same? More wood means more resonance, so the shape DOES have an effect. If the overall mass of the guitar is the same but the shapes are different, then maybe not so.

Well, I'm talking about a Super-strat shap VS a normal Strat shape.
More or less the same shape.
Or like, if you compare a JEM with a monkey grip to a guitar of the same shape, but without a monkey grip.
Or a Strat with SSS routing versus a Srat with swimming pool routing.

You won't be able to tell the difference. That's just silly.

Quote by sashki
What about on the '61 SG? Or is it the same distance?

It's about the same.
#18
Quote by XtAsY2007
The shape DOES have an effect actually. If you have the same thickness of wood for two guitars, but one guitars body was square and the other strat shaped, do you really think it will sound the same? More wood means more resonance, so the shape DOES have an effect. If the overall mass of the guitar is the same but the shapes are different, then maybe not so.

but the biggest difference between a tele and strat is the amount of 'twang'.
and what does resononance have to do with he twang ???
#19
1)Wood and wood quality: Even if the guitar has the same wood, the quality will affect the sound
2)Body shape,size and cavities: The amount of wood changes the sound as does the lack of it.
3)Metals used and where they are used: Different metals impart a different tone and depending on their location(nut etc) can affect the sound
4)Pickups, wiring and electronics used: Even with the same pickups, the way the guitar is wired makes a difference as do the parts used.
5)Nut: The nut makws a huge difference of course
6)neck type and bridge type: Neck-through, string through, bolt on, wrap around etc...all make differences as do the size of the necks, the scale length etc...
I've developed a complex where everytime I hear a Lamb of God song, I burst out laughing

My 7 String V build
My Main Guitars:
Kramer Striker FR-2027SM 7 String
BC Rich Afterburner Warlock
Washburn Xb100 Bass
My Effect(s)/Misc:
Digitech RP350
#21
Quote by DagMX
1)Wood and wood quality: Even if the guitar has the same wood, the quality will affect the sound
2)Body shape,size and cavities: The amount of wood changes the sound as does the lack of it.
3)Metals used and where they are used: Different metals impart a different tone and depending on their location(nut etc) can affect the sound
4)Pickups, wiring and electronics used: Even with the same pickups, the way the guitar is wired makes a difference as do the parts used.
5)Nut: The nut makws a huge difference of course
6)neck type and bridge type: Neck-through, string through, bolt on, wrap around etc...all make differences as do the size of the necks, the scale length etc...


Just to clear something up on point 4, a little excess solder over a tone pot wont make a difference in tone, the amount of k on the pot used does (250k pot vs 500k pot, 500k is a lot brighter if I recall correctly).
#22
Quote by The Masterplan
but the biggest difference between a tele and strat is the amount of 'twang'.
and what does resononance have to do with he twang ???

More high end and a stronger attack gives it twang.
And it resonates more at some frequencies than at others.
#24
Quote by forsaknazrael
...It's the bridge plate...

Oh and, the fact that the pickup is rotate a bit closer to the bridge.

15 degrees, I think.

But the other factors, such as pickups, affect it, too.

Twangggggg
#26
Myself, I like Telecasters way more than any other guitar. Teles are just way more comfortable to play, and you dont have a whammy bar to worry about.

Teles are also used to play a lot of the music I like.

=]]
#27
Quote by forsaknazrael
That's the metal plate behind the bridge pickup...That's what gives a Tele it's twang. Guaranteed.


It's the bridge, although the plate definitely adds to it. You'll still get similar twang out of a strat pickup mounted in a tele bridge.