#1
Hey all.

I put up a study in my profile. You might find it helpful for learning Jazz.
There's description in the track, but in a nutshell its 8 verses in the key of C
at 78 BPM to a click track.

The changes are:

| Dm7 - | G7 - | Cmaj7 - | Em7b5 A7 |

The last bar would generally be another Cmaj7. The substitution is a secondary
dominant (A7 is the V of the ii) progression leading back to Dm7. Think (mostly)
D Harmonic minor.

It has lots of basic jazz stuff at a nice slow tempo -- passing tones, chromatics,
phrasing, altered dominant sounds. Easy to pick up.

Of particular interest, in the 5 & 6 verses, rather than D Harmonic minor, the lines
are based on a descending Em7 - Ebm7 - Dm7 line. Descending chromatic chords
can also lead back to the top....
#2
Thats really cool, it has a lovely laid-back feel to it.

I don't understand one thing about what you wrote. You say it's a ii-V-I progression, but then you have four(five?) chords?

Apart from that, I understand what your talking about (sorry for hi-jacking your topic!)
#3
@jam^^The Dm7 and G7 are the 2nd and 5th degrees of the I (C) respectively , A7 is the 5th degree of the ii (D) and the Em7b5 is the 6th degree of the V (G).
Therefore ii - V -I


If I'm mistaken anyone is free to correct me.
Proud Owner of:

Jackson RR3
Jackson WRMG

Quote by madbasslover
What's the big deal with Gibsons, anyway?
I've heard loads of Gibsons being played before
and they don't sound any more special than
any other guitar.

^UG's King Of Fail.
Last edited by Eternal_One at Oct 28, 2007,
#6
er Em7b5 is the 6th of G is it not?
Proud Owner of:

Jackson RR3
Jackson WRMG

Quote by madbasslover
What's the big deal with Gibsons, anyway?
I've heard loads of Gibsons being played before
and they don't sound any more special than
any other guitar.

^UG's King Of Fail.
#8
Ah I see. Thx.

The m7b5 and Dominant chords have a very Jazzy feel and flavor to it, pretty wicked.
Proud Owner of:

Jackson RR3
Jackson WRMG

Quote by madbasslover
What's the big deal with Gibsons, anyway?
I've heard loads of Gibsons being played before
and they don't sound any more special than
any other guitar.

^UG's King Of Fail.
#9
Quote by branny1982

what about the Em7b5 ??

ed- oh i see now, its actually the ii of Dm


That's right! it's the ii of Dm.
Yeah, secondary dominants are modulation (changing key) devices.
In this case temporarily moving to Dm from C which is why you'd play
D Harmonic minor over the last measure.

Any chord (aside from the tonic) can have a secondary dominant except for
the vii7B5 because that chord it too unstabe to be a tonic.
#10
Quote by edg
Basically there's the ii-V-I and then, in order to lead back to the ii at the beginning,
there's a minor ii-V-i, where the Dm7 temporarily is pointed to as the i of a minor
key (key of Dm). It's basically just a turnaround device since 2 measure of Cmaj7
gets a bit boring.


Right,

the minor ii V i usually includes a b9 in the dominant chord....
example: Em7b5 - A7b9 - Dm7

how you have it is fine.... just adding to what you were saying. and playing the D harmonic minor as you suggested pretty much accomplishes that sound, as the the A7b9 arpeggio can be found within that scale.
shred is gaudy music
#11
This sounds good from your description, my PC doesn't have sound at the moment though so I cant listen to it Can you download off the profiles... If so ill put it on my other PC but if not is there any chance you have a D music accout or something similar to upload it to?

Btw Does this have a lead line over it or is it just chords, and if it does have a lead line any chance that you can post the backing track you used if you recorded them seperatly? I think good backing tracks are hard to find and your other ones were good from what I remember!

Thanks for this though
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#12
Yeah I can put it there. I'll make a backing for it too -- it's just me playing the
light harmony. I wanted the metronome track to come thru. I'll reply here when I
do it.

About the A7b9. Yeah. I think just A7 keeps it open to doing different things
over it. Also of interest when you have V7 chord functioning for a minor tonic
chord (the Dm7 in this case) and are using the Harmonic minor (which would be the
5th mode of the harmonic minor) you can also play the entire major triad 1/2 step up.
That also suggests the b9. 2 majors 1/2 step apart is a very harmonic minory sound.
And of course the diminished arpeggio can be found in there too.
#13
the simpler the rhythm voicings, the more freedom the soloist has over it. He is welcome to play an A7b9 but is not restricted to it - he can draw from half-whole diminished, altered, wholetone, whatever he feels like over the dominant.

Modal jazz takes this freedom much further.

Ornette Coleman took this idea to extremes with his "harmolodic concept" which was mostly responsible for free jazz.
#14
Quote by edg
Yeah I can put it there. I'll make a backing for it too -- it's just me playing the
light harmony. I wanted the metronome track to come thru. I'll reply here when I
do it.

About the A7b9. Yeah. I think just A7 keeps it open to doing different things
over it. Also of interest when you have V7 chord functioning for a minor tonic
chord (the Dm7 in this case) and are using the Harmonic minor (which would be the
5th mode of the harmonic minor) you can also play the entire major triad 1/2 step up.
That also suggests the b9. 2 majors 1/2 step apart is a very harmonic minory sound.
And of course the diminished arpeggio can be found in there too.


yup thats cool, just thought id add that info.
shred is gaudy music
#16
Thanks ill get it when I get home!

Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.