#1
Hey guys.

I've been recently getting more serious about my playing and I wanted to set about improving as best I can. My practice regimes can be a little aimless at times and I was wondering if one of the konowledgable minds on UG could help me with this.

I would like the regime to focus mainly on lead techniques.

I could practise for an hour a day (minimum), more on weekends.

I'm okay at most things at the minute but would like to build up my speed.

I don't really wanna go into music theory at the minute as I feel that I know enough of the basics. (circle of fifths, major scale, progressions, chord construction, intervals etc)

Feel free to post some suggestions or pm me with some ideas.

Thanks in advance everbody
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#2
couple of things to note ,,, if your serious about playing guitar you dont want to be focusing primarily on just lead you want to put equal effort into lead AND rhythm (rhythm is just as important as lead),,, a great player is great at all aspects not just this and that

And you would do well to keep going with the theory, mind numbing as it is once its done its outa the way

And its not that hard to come up with a practice regime, take mine as an example

spend about up to 10 minutes on fingers exercises with a metronome, first just standard chromatic stuff then go through a couple of scale shapes

then do a little improvisation for wot ever length of time floats your boat

Find your self a rhythm exercise that you can do with a metronome, am sure theres something that would fit the bill in the lessons section somewhere, go through that for about 10 mins or so, then a little rhythm playing to put the exercise to use

btw i know theres a lota techniques you can practice and all that but stuff like string bending, hammer ons and such like you can practice whilst improvising

then just go wild!!! lol (i.e. play songs, look into new techniques etc etc)


,,,,,,,it works for me anyway
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Last edited by sajuuk at Oct 28, 2007,
#3
i start out with a few of these right here

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/guitar_techniques/lateral_dexterity.html
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/guitar_techniques/economy_picking.html

and definantly use this
http://www.metronomeonline.com/

^i do it for about 20-30 minutes, but 10-15 would work to^

then i go through my list of 14 songs that i love to play, but challenge me at the same time.

puts me at about 30-45 minutes into practice

and from there i either work on basic improv, work on a music theory textbook i have, or teach myself a new technique from a video or something
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#4
The FUN way to pratice!

• Get some kind of easy-to-use recorder.
• Lay down a rhythm track and a simple three-chord rock chord progression.
• Practice with a scales and modes book.

Try the blues scale until you know it up and down the fretboard (lots of fun). Then try all the different modes (Dorian, Phrygian, Harmonic Minor, etc.) until you know those all over the fretboard.
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American HM Strat | LP Studio
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Last edited by LEVEL4 at Oct 28, 2007,
#5
thanks for the advice fellas.

And to sajuuk, i know rythm is important too its just that ill be playing lead in a band pretty son and i just want t get my chps up as my first priority
I've got something in my front pocket for you.
Why don't you reach down in my pocket and see what it is?
Then grab onto it, it's just for you.
Give a little squeeze and say: "How do you do?"
#6
Quote by LEVEL4
The FUN way to pratice!

• Get some kind of easy-to-use recorder.
• Lay down a rhythm track and a simple three-chord rock chord progression.
• Practice with a scales and mode book.

Try the blues scale until you know it up and down the fretboard (lots of fun). Then try all the different modes (Dorian, Phrygian, Harmonic Minor, etc.) until you know those all over the fretboard.


Cheers man. I already know the blues scale all over. When ever I play any other scales t still comes out bluesy sounding. Gonna have to work on that...
I've got something in my front pocket for you.
Why don't you reach down in my pocket and see what it is?
Then grab onto it, it's just for you.
Give a little squeeze and say: "How do you do?"