#1
^, and what would it do to the guitar? My esp f-250 came in the mail ( I LOVE IT BY THE WAY ) and I was just wondering... It's agathis wood.
#2
Warping = Twisting and generally bending out of shape.
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Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#3
Quote by FacingUsAll
Warping = Twisting and generally bending out of shape.

so, is agathis really a big problem, if so, what should I do? I don't have a case or anything for it.. I'm sure to buy one in the coming weeks if I really need one. If not I don't have to worry, right?
#4
Wood warping generally is caused by moisture and sudden changes in temperature. On a guitar it'd probably result in tuning, intonation and playing issues as the finish might crack
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#5
Quote by Links 2 3 4
^, and what would it do to the guitar? My esp f-250 came in the mail ( I LOVE IT BY THE WAY ) and I was just wondering... It's agathis wood.



I'm not really sure if the first thing that should come to mind when you get a new guitar is warping, but who cares.

As said above warping is twisting, meaning that the guitar or neck take on a different shape (which is very bad, and most of the times this means the end for a guitar if it's warps in a way that can't be corrected by the trussrod).

Companies like Hamer and Vigier have tried tried to think of new ways to prevent warping, for instance by matching the blocks of wood that are used in construction in a certain way, or by replacing the trussrod with carbon.

Quote by Links 2 3 4
so, is agathis really a big problem, if so, what should I do? I don't have a case or anything for it.. I'm sure to buy one in the coming weeks if I really need one. If not I don't have to worry, right?


No it's not, so don't worry.

Also, warping can happen when you put to much, or too little stress on a guitar, or because of tensions in the wood that aren't caused by your actions.

The first category usually involves necks with badly adjusted truss rods and can be fixed most of the time by a good setup. The second kind however is pretty much impossible to fix, but on most guitars this doesn't really happem, except after many, many, years or on very cheap, poorly constructed, instruments.
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Last edited by Bonsaischaap at Oct 29, 2007,
#6
Thanks a lot guys. Also, I have a First Act Gigbag... I'm embarassed to carry my guitar to school in it, I'm thinking about scribbling out First Act, or putting duct tape over it, so no one can see the guitar almost fits, only the end won't go in. I'll look into getting a hard case for it.