#1
I dont remember what it is called, but my teacher just explained this to me.

Dont max out your EQ on a your amp with an active bass.....

say you like it 8 bass 6 mid and 5.5 treble and you ahve it set like that on your bass and amp

say you want to add more bass.
there isnt alot more you can get if your already at 8

then what you do is cut everything equally
got to 6 bass 4 mid and 3.5 treble, the only difference is the volume will be lower, turn up the volume

you will still have the same tone, then you if you need more bottom end you have to freedom to turn it up....

this was just kind of a mind blow for me, i thought id share

and keep it flat for the most part on your bass so you can turn it up or down from there you will also have the freedom to do so

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
Last edited by Narcotics at Oct 29, 2007,
#2
I generally set my EQ at a pretty high volume and kinda do the same thing... and then lower the volume to whatever actual level I want to play at.
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#3
Quote by Revalk
I generally set my EQ at a pretty high volume and kinda do the same thing... and then lower the volume to whatever actual level I want to play at.


thats like the exact opposite of what im trying to explain :p

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#5
Yeah... I guess that makes sense... Although, it somehow seems wrong. I'm sure someone (AKA Fitz) can answer this better, but it seems you would be cutting or not boosting certain frequencys and your basses tone would be different because while you have all the ratios the same you're now cutting from the flat frequency and the tone wouldn't be the same.
#8
is this not just common sense?
MM Stingray
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#9
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Yeah... I guess that makes sense... Although, it somehow seems wrong. I'm sure someone (AKA Fitz) can answer this better, but it seems you would be cutting or not boosting certain frequencys and your basses tone would be different because while you have all the ratios the same you're now cutting from the flat frequency and the tone wouldn't be the same.

Yeah, some sexy gigantic bass God literally wrote a blog exactly about this just the other day. The point is, if you want to properly EQ, you shouldn't be working on an amp that has bull**** passive tone controls (i.e. 0-10). A proper EQer should talk in frequencies and in +/- dB - a flat EQ should be at 0, not at 5.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#10
Quote by thefitz
Yeah, some sexy gigantic bass God literally wrote a blog exactly about this just the other day. The point is, if you want to properly EQ, you shouldn't be working on an amp that has bull**** passive tone controls (i.e. 0-10). A proper EQer should talk in frequencies and in +/- dB - a flat EQ should be at 0, not at 5.


are you that sexy gigantic bass god? i'd believe you if you said yes.
MM Stingray
MIA P Bass
MIM Jazz Bass
GK 700RB-II Head
GK 410SBX Cab
Sansamp 3 Ch. DI
Crybaby Bass Wah
Bass Big Muff
DD3 Delay

MIA Strat
Nashville Tele
Martin 00015M
Hot Rod Deluxe
Big Muff
DS1
Hendrix Crybaby Wah
#11
Quote by thefitz
Yeah, some sexy gigantic bass God literally wrote a blog exactly about this just the other day. The point is, if you want to properly EQ, you shouldn't be working on an amp that has bull**** passive tone controls (i.e. 0-10). A proper EQer should talk in frequencies and in +/- dB - a flat EQ should be at 0, not at 5.


Fabulous rant, one of your best. Although I do have a friend who thinks Halo is the most innovative FPS ever made... How much to rent out your beating fists of fury? Also I'm assuming it would be free shipping...

Anyway, I have a question about the EQ thing now. I just realized that I have, effectively a 7 band EQ with my 3EQ bass and 4EQ amp. Is there a resource anywhere that can show what different frequency's cut/boosted can do for a tone? Or is it mostly just shedding with your amp, tinkering around with the EQ?
#12
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Fabulous rant, one of your best. Although I do have a friend who thinks Halo is the most innovative FPS ever made... How much to rent out your beating fists of fury? Also I'm assuming it would be free shipping...

Anyway, I have a question about the EQ thing now. I just realized that I have, effectively a 7 band EQ with my 3EQ bass and 4EQ amp. Is there a resource anywhere that can show what different frequency's cut/boosted can do for a tone? Or is it mostly just shedding with your amp, tinkering around with the EQ?



I bet if you google long and hard enough you are bound to find something pretty thorough and specific. I have a home recording book that explains what each of about 15 frequency ranges do when equing a ton of different instruments, from bass to vocals to horns etc. A comprable guide must be on the net somewhere, though of course it's just a starting place for your own ears.
#13
Shedding is the way to go, however, I've come up with a set of 'terminology' to refer to certain range of frequencies. Does anyone mind a minor thread hijack? I'll explain something that most people will appreciate.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#14
*passes the thread humbly*

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#15
I do not object to the hijacking Fitzy, EQing using the graphic (9-band) on my amp is a weak point of mine. I usually cop out and stick to the knobs.
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Quote by Caustic
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#17
Well, I don't know how to structure this, but I'll give my descriptions of the frequencies, and maybe you all can shape your own tone by adding and removing what you like or dislike.

Anyway, the whole 30Hz area and below I call (and most people call) THE SUBS. Sub referring to audible. We all know my love for 18" speakers and stereo rigs, but the truth is if you don't have a subwoofer that can handle the 30Hz area, you might want to dial it out. It uses speaker power and for most people it clouds the signal considerably with something you essentially can't hear. Yes, you can feel it, but it's not worth sacrificing clarity, especially if you don't have a subwoofer cabinet. If you want a nice bassy tone that's clear, you might want to boost the following bands.

The 50-80Hz area is what I call THE BASS. If you want a nice bassy tone, this is the area you want to boost. It's around the fundamental of the low E and you can boost this frequency and still have some clarity (assuming you cut other places).

The 100Hz area is what I call THE KICK or the THE PUNCH. To get that Jaco staccato tone, you might need to pad this area up. If you are going to pad this area up, make sure you be careful at the next band. Anyway, this one is where you start to get hit with sound waves, as opposed to feeling a minor rumble in your ass.

The 150Hz-350Hz is what I call THE MUD. This is my least favourite band and I always cut somewhere within it. Boosting this area results in notes that sound like you're humming with your nose plugged and you can't tell what octave the note's in. This is the area that bull**** non-musicians and rap lovers boost and think it's bass. It's what makes your kick drum go 'whop, whop'. However, I dial this out a bit and compensate the lost bottom by boosting the bass. Where exactly you cut in this band is your sonic signature. However, this range is most tied in with 'warmth' and you might think your tone is a bit too machine like without it.

400Hz-750Hz is what I call THE HONK. This is a decidedly guitar-like area of the frequency spectrum. A boost or a cut in this area gives perhaps the most perceivable change in volume out of all the bands. Going overboard with this area can make your tone sound quite honky and sound like a car horn. It detracts from your bottom end and high end without clouding the signal, so be careful. However, used in moderation, this honkiness can be the difference between being heard and being not heard with a loud guitar.

800Hz-<1500Hz is what I call THE TEXTURE. This is a strange area because it's above the honky cutting range but below the attack range. Playing around this area can change the timbre of your bass quite a bit, but it won't really make a difference when it comes to cutting through. If you want audio examples, Jason's "bass" in Wherever I May Roam has a good boost in that area, and Pete Wentz's tone is pretty much ALL 800Hz. Personally, I set this level to the mid point between the previous band and the next band. 800Hz sounds like TSSHHH TSHHHH TSHHHH TSHHHH.

1500Hz-~4000Hz is what I call THE ATTACK. In my opinion, this band is the dual of the mud. I boost this area the exact same amount I cut the mud. This area is where your string attack is. If you want your audience to know where one note ends and the other begins, you might want to hop on this frequency. If you want a consistant rumble, dial it out. Again, like the mud, where exactly you boost this area is your sonic signature, as people will rarely boost/cut both the attack and the mud at the exact same points.

5000Hz< is what I call THE AIR. The click of your frets and the swoosh of your fingers against the strings is directly in this area. 8000Hz+ is more appropriately 'the air', but 5000Hz has similar attributes. This band is the icing on the cake when it comes to clarity - if you cut it, you can have a tone that cuts but isn't clear. I set it right to the point just before the clacks start sounding harsh.

Anyway, that's how I see it. If you're keeping score from the very beginning of the honk to the very end of the attack is the wah pedal sweep area. Starting at 500Hz, it sounds like you're saying 'oooooo'. In the middle, you're at 'aaaaaaa', and at the top, you're saying 'eeeeeee'.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#19
That’s one of the most informative posts I think I’ve ever read. Your blog was great too.

I hope we do get rid of all those "names" treble, "the mids" ect.

That kind of talking works for experienced bassists but for us noobs who are here to learn.
How do you tell the frequency your using?
Now, a question of etiquette - as I pass, do I give you the ass or the crotch?
#20
^VERY good question, and it's quite difficult to find out. If you don't have a pedal/EQ literally saying the numbers, you have to bust out your amp's manual and find out what each knob affects. There should be a specs sheet at the back that says exactly what they do. If there isn't one, get e-mailing!
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#22
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Dude, he wasn't asking you to pass over the thread, he was TELLING you he was gonna hijack


i could have been no this is my thread biatch, but its the fitz and he scared me

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#24
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
I have another question. In your Gospel it says something about, when adjusting a band you have to look at the two adjacent bands. Why?

The whole goal is the EQ is really all about reference. Like the threadstarter said, if you're already at "8" and want a bassier tone, there's not much higher to go. To really excentuate the band you want to boost/cut, you need to look at the bands beside it, instead of it's overal level amplitude (because, again, in the end it's all reference). Adjusting the 10kHz area won't really effect your 50Hz, but the 30Hz and 150Hz bands can really effect it. Also, looking at adjacent bands reduces the chance of steep, steep curves. If you want, say, a bassier tone and your 'lo-mids' are already set low, you might not need to crank the bass to a ridiculously high degree - simply setting it flat might do the job. This ties into my no-more-than-6dB difference between adjacent bands. A 6dB boost might not seem like much, but when it's beside a 6dB cut, it ends up being huge.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#25
Okay I see. So, bands that are near each other will affect the tone, to a degree, in a similar way? Maybe I'm reading this wrong but that's what I got out of it. Unless you mean that adjacent bands can actually affect the band in question in a literal sense. In which case, why?
#26
You're pretty much right, but here's a crappy illustration for you. Get a thick blanket and a pen. Now, try to stick the pen through the blanket/make a tent. Notice that just the pen area doesn't rise - the parts of the blanket beside it rise as well. It's the same thing with frequencies - when you boost/cut one number, you're boosting and cutting the ones around it too, even though at a much lesser degree.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#27
AHA! What a perfect analogy! I think I came to this realization (or more talked it through) a while ago but dismissed it as utter ****. That's good to know for concrete fact. I guess it makes sense though. If an EQ frequency (note: I didn't use knob there) only boosted it's specific frequency it wouldn't really be affecting all that much of the overall sound would it? You would need an 8000EQ to make any kind of serious affect on your tone.
#28
^Pretty much. You're after an EQ 'curve', anyway. My EQ curve only really has 1 peak and one valley - I dial out some mud and add some attack.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..