#1
Ok, so im drifting away from all that metal stuff, and i wanna get into jazz.
What are stuff i should know? i never played jazzed before, so explain it like you would to someone who doesnt even know what jazz is. My goal is to be able to improvise. Also, Who are some highly regarded Jazz guitarists, or musicians? and how do i get into the jazz community(meaning i know a lot of jazz songs , not necessarily be able to play them, and how to play jazz)?'

thanks
#2
I play in my jazz band at school, but suck when it comes to anything other than improvising, and for that. Learn the pentatonic scales, also, any other scale you know helps.
#3
A real book would help. It has a bunch of standards and stuff which is great to know. As far as scales go, Major, Bebop, alt. minor, dorian, diminished, and dominant scales are a good place to start. Learning the blues in Bb and F are great for jamming. uhh, PM me for more info.
Last edited by mustardman at Oct 31, 2007,
#4
^ recommend a book?

How do you make a scale sound jazzy while improvising?
#5
First off, good choice!

Okay, so I would start by listening to jazz first. All kinds, even if there is no guitar involved. It's the rhythm you want to get down as it can be hard to master. I'd recommend some Kenny G, Dave Brubeck, Paul Jackson Jr, Chuck Loeb, Nils, George Benson, Wes Montgomery to start. I'd also start familiarizing myself with 7th and 9th chords and their inversions as they are used quite frequently in this genre. Learning some jazz scales is a good idea too (like some of the bebop ones) but, I think regular scales work just fine for improvisation (such as pentatonic, major, minor, modes, etc.)

As for improvisation, it's all about your feel. Yes, you do have to know those scales forward and backward but if you don't have a feel, it will never work. Google some jazz backing tracks and some should provide you with the key they are playing in. Work on cultivating some smooth jazz sounding chops that you should have picked up from those artists listed above. Above all, practice. Jazz is no easy feat but in time, it's extremely fun and beneficial. It opens up doors to new genres and expands your knowledge immensely. Good luck cat.
#7
Quote by shtiming
^ recommend a book?

How do you make a scale sound jazzy while improvising?


Some techniques used in jazz improvisation are, don't bend notes. Use passing tones. Octave intervals. Chromatic runs. Those are just a few, you should pick them up in time.
#8
yeah one of the best ways to pick up skills is to simply listen. it doesnt even have to be guitar, listen to the trumpet or sax and try to emulate it on guitar.
#9
Quote by mustardman
yeah one of the best ways to pick up skills is to simply listen. it doesnt even have to be guitar, listen to the trumpet or sax and try to emulate it on guitar.


Emulating wind instruments is a good idea, I forgot that. I took the old Hey Arnold! Theme song which was originally done on Trumpet/Sax and transcribed it out for the guitar. Things like that will really advance your learning.
#10
so can i get an example of a Passing tone? And what is inside the Real Book? Like what does it teach.
#11
Quote by shtiming
so can i get an example of a Passing tone? And what is inside the Real Book? Like what does it teach.


Take the minor Pentatonic scales 1st inversion in G. On the G string you would normally play G|---3----5

With a passing tone though, you would play G|---3----5----6

You want to tend to "breeze" over this and try not to land on it as it wont resolve right with the scale.
#12
The real book is simply a book full of jazz standards. I think it has like 400 songs or something like that.

also another example of a passing tone is this

e-----5--8--6s7--

make sure that the Bb is on the upbeat, so that you land on the B on the down beat.
#13
as far as jazz guitarists, kenny burrell, grant green, bireli lagrene, django, angelo debarre, pat metheny, and joe pass are a great place to start