#1
Basically, I'm looking for the best method of recording drums with one SM58(not ideal, I know, but it's all I have for now). Right now I have it set up by the floor tom, pointing towards the crash symbol(roughly speaking) and it's sounding really bassy and 'flat' (yes, I'm aware that it won't sound amazing with just one mic).
Any help or ideas would be much appreciated

Cheers
#2
Try setting it up as an overhead about 3 feet centered in front of the kit. I've had pretty good success with this for live off the floor stuff.
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#3
maybe record every piece of the drum set per separate and then mix all the tracks
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#4
your best bet is going to be with the overhead method. center on the set about 3 feet in front of the kit.
#5
Quote by samerika
maybe record every piece of the drum set per separate and then mix all the tracks



that would be way too difficult and each part would have to be played perfectly
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#6
I wouldn't but it by the floor tom, it would be too loud.

When my band did it, we had one cheap mic, and we put it as an overhead, slightly onto the snare/hi-hat side, like jst above the snare/high tom.

It souded decent considereing the circumstances.
#7
The only thing about putting it as an overhead, you get hardly any bass drum in the mix. Try putting if further in front of the kit, and lower.
#8
If your drummer has a strong loud kick, it shouldn't be an issue.
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#9
Quote by lespaul_jube
The only thing about putting it as an overhead, you get hardly any bass drum in the mix. Try putting if further in front of the kit, and lower.

this is what I do when I've only got one dynamic mike. it only makes sense.

if you have it too high and over the kit, you'll get too much loud cymbal wash and
end up with a less powerful kick sound. placing the mike in front of the drums more,
reduces the wash because most of the cymbals volume goes along the vertical axis.
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#10
Overhead. slightly nearer the snare and hi-hat.
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#11
You'd be much better off with the SM-57, more multipurpose, and strangely cheaper too...
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#13
I did a little test the other week, and the '58 does overheads slightly better.

I'd point it above and behind the snare, pointed between at the kick pedal and hi hat, but slightly closer to the kick.

Just don't use the toms too much.
#14
Quote by orgasmickey
this is what I do when I've only got one dynamic mike. it only makes sense.

if you have it too high and over the kit, you'll get too much loud cymbal wash and
end up with a less powerful kick sound. placing the mike in front of the drums more,
reduces the wash because most of the cymbals volume goes along the vertical axis.


orgasmickey is right, you have to be careful of that "wash" effect that too much cymbal in a mix can cause. This can especially happen if your drummer is heavy handed on the cymbals.

If you had the time, I'd recommend getting your drummer to play while you record him, and try the mic in different spots of the room. It can sometimes be surprising what the acoustics of a room will do for your sound. You might find just the right spot for the mix you're trying to achieve.
#15
I suggest placing it in front of the kit. The point of using overheads is to get a master stereo image of the set, and since you're only using 1 mic, this would be utterly pointless. Also as others stated, your mix can potentially be too cymbal heavy if placed overhead. Try placing your mic in front center area of the kit, around between the height of the toms (but I suggest you experiment to find the best possible spot). Also, since you're using a dynamic mic, don't put it too far away from the kit because then you'll have to crank the gain to get a decent level, which means you'll also be cranking the noise floor.
#16
Quote by northy
You'd be much better off with the SM-57, more multipurpose, and strangely cheaper too...



The Shure SM57 and SM58 are extremely related mics.

the one difference is that the SM58 has a ball end containing a pop filter which makes it the vest vocal mic of the two in a live setting.

micing the drums with either the 57 or 58 should work but it will take some time getting the mic in a good spot when using a single mic to record a full set.
#17
Something I tried with a friend of mine before I got into direct-line recording...we hung a mic (as mentioned) 3 feet above the kit...did a take, then did another take with the mic 3 feet away on the floor. Just worked them in together and the result was pretty decent.
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#18
^ you better be a darn good drummer who can replay exactly the same on the second take for a recording setup like that...
if one too many things are wrong you'll be hearing double snares or something...
#19
Eh...good point lol. Best I can really tell is to play around with it.
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#20
2310
If you really need a mic for the drums you can try this product which I used for vocals for a few months...it's ok for the price and comes with a lot for just $20

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/OnStage-Stands-MS7510-Mic-Pro-Pak?sku=270619
careful with the cheap clip it comes with...they break easily.

If its your mixer or other gear limiting you to one mic all I can say is get a job and save up.
Just don't go all out with pro grade studio gear if you are only doing this for fun or as a hobby...you'll get yourself into a bad position with money by pulling a move like that.

edit:
this mic was ok on vocals but im not sure how well it will work on drums.
For the price its a good one to try though...
Last edited by moody07747 at Nov 9, 2007,
#21
Quote by SB2Guitar
If you had the time, I'd recommend getting your drummer to play while you record him, and try the mic in different spots of the room. It can sometimes be surprising what the acoustics of a room will do for your sound. You might find just the right spot for the mix you're trying to achieve.


Yes, finally! Yes!

Have the drummer just play for 15 minutes. Arm the track and record him playing. Every 2 minutes, move the mic somewhere else - shout into the mic where the position is or create flags on the track if near the computer (and if you're using recording software). Put in in a lot of places and angles, and after 15 minutes listen to the recording. Flag the best sounding positions and narrow them down.

Every room is so much different from every other room that you can't really apply only past experience to something like this. You have to experiment.