#1
anyone know any simple, yet efficient triplet exercises? I'm starting to get the hang of them, but I think a good exercise would help me alot. Any suggestions?
#3
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#4
playing triplet isn't the same thing as galloping. triplets are three notes spaced out evenly in one beat. playing three note per string scales with a metronome is a good way to practice triplets. if you were talking about practicing galloping then you should just practice it slowly with a metronome and build up speed. learning a song with some galloping is a good idea too.
#5
I wasn't really talking about galloping, but the scales idea is really good. Will definately give it a try. Thanx!
#6
Quote by Cold Flame44
I wasn't really talking about galloping, but the scales idea is really good. Will definately give it a try. Thanx!


yeah try three notes per string scales and use alternate picking
(i.e.) down up down, up down up, etc.
#7
Three note per string scales?! Oh boy....

Listen, a triplet is just a subdivision to a beat - one-and-ah-two-and-ah ... you
can practice ANY pattern you want that way. You SHOULD practice different patterns
that way. Now, if three notes per string helps you familiarize yourself with
triplets to begin with, go for it, but don't tie yourself to notes per beat
with number of notes per string -- that would be musical nonsense.
#8
play your scales in a triplet pattern, its easyest if as you play the 3 notes, say something like "I Like Cheese", cos it helps to keep the triplet timing,
also, for good practice, when you play the first 3 notes in the scale, don't star from the fourth and go to the sixth, go back to the second, so you play a triplet from every note, then do the same on the way back down

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#9
Try a pentatonic triplet exercise too, it's fairly easy to get the hang of. Do it with all your scale shapes.

#10
Quote by edg
Three note per string scales?! Oh boy....

Listen, a triplet is just a subdivision to a beat - one-and-ah-two-and-ah ... you
can practice ANY pattern you want that way. You SHOULD practice different patterns
that way. Now, if three notes per string helps you familiarize yourself with
triplets to begin with, go for it, but don't tie yourself to notes per beat
with number of notes per string -- that would be musical nonsense.


when did anyone say it WASN'T a subdivision of the beat? the suggestion was just for a practical exercise
#12
well i believe this would be one of the most efficient exercises seeing as it:
helps him learn note location/scalar shapes
helps him with manipulation of alternate picking
helps him with rhythm

sorry, apparently he should only be working on rhythm.
#13
Yes, you're trying to help, but you're missing the point. The practical way of
practicing TRIPLETS, is use them a variety of ways irrespective of what notes/
what strings/what fingers you're using.

If you know some scales, practice them as triplets, if you know some sweeps
practice them as triplets, if you know 3, 4, 5, 6, a thousand note repeating pattern
practice them as triplets. Practice repeating 1 note as triplets.

If you can do all that without thinking about it, then you'll know triplets.

There's even something to be argued that a 3 note per string scale isn't a very good
way to practice them. Things that are already in groups of 3 tend to sound
musically dull and boring when played as triplets. It's too obvious. A repeating
group of 4 notes, however, can sound great as triplets. It undulates and moves.
That's what phrasing is all about, and triplets are part of phrasing.
#14
another way to really get the triplet rhythm down would be to go from sixteenth notes (4 notes per beat) to triplets. it really helps to count them as you play them, 1, e, and, a, 2, e, and, a, 3, trip, let, 4, trip, let. It really gets the triplet idea in your head. I think edg made a really good point not to limit your triplet playing just to 3 note perstring scales since triplets can occur any where in music. Three note perstring scales is just a good way to start and it helps you learn scale patterns as well.
#15
Indeed 3 note per string scales aren't the only thing you should practice, but I don't see how it could hurt to work on them too. Here's a good one,



Make sure you're strictly alternate picking.