#1
i think i've learned the ionian and aeolian modes to death! i get how to use them and i can recognise them in songs and improvise and write with them easily.

I want to expand onto using some other modes now...

however the sort of stuff i'm familiar with is usually based around major or minor...

does anyone know any bands/genres that tend to use other modes of the major scale in their riffs and leads and dont just play random notes?
Dancing In Your Dust
#2
All of the modes are based around the major scale, so you're not going to escape that. There's a list of the modes and what styles they're mainly used for in the MT sticky.
#3
Contrary to popular belief, modes don't have specific genres attached to them. Specific feels, yes, but no genres. Because of the chord/mode relationship (their married with 2 kids , jokes) the mode will change in accordance with the chord that is under it. So if you have a three chord song, there will be three modes in the melody/solo.

You probably were not feeling the ionian and aeolian per sey, but most likely the minor feel of the 3 minor modes (as aeolian) and the major feel of the 3 major modes (ionian).

And RTFS. It explains everything 10 times better than me.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#4
all of the modes are based around a major or minor tonality. the ionian, lydian, and mixolydian all sound 'major' while the dorian, phrygian, aeolian, and locrian all sound 'minor'. if you want a genre that messes around with different modes, just listen to a lot of jazz. jazz is all about f-ing around modes and colorful chords.