#1
hey iv only statred 2 play and i woz wondering con some1 tell me whats the best way 2 start like can eny1 tell me some gd rockish songs i could learn
#2
Quote by Tabitha_Twitcht
hey iv only statred 2 play and i woz wondering con some1 tell me whats the best way 2 start like can eny1 tell me some gd rockish songs i could learn


Rockish songs lol :P

ermm learn some songs by KISS they're pretty easy

or Bob Dylan

oh Wild Thing - The Troggs
#4
Quote by Tabitha_Twitcht
hey thanks

you might wanna try out some nirvana stuff as well.
and seven nation army
#5
Welcome to guitar and UG! Learning songs is a good way to get started but may I also suggest:

1) Chromatics for finger strength and dexterity (ie: 1-2-3-4 next string, 1-2-3-4 etc.).
2) Scales (Major, Pentatonic) for learning to build solo's and for dexterity.
3) Start to at least get familiar with where the notes are on the fretboard.
4) Learn to tune your axe! Get a $20 Korg tuner at your local guitar store.
5) Watch as many videos on YouTube as you can...just do a search on "guitar".
6) HAVE FUN! This is why we do what we do...it's fun

If you want any clearification on any of that, just ask

Chris
#7
some metallica songs are pretty easy, like "i dissapear" and "enter sandman" not including the solos of course.
#8
Quote by RCShadow

3) Start to at least get familiar with where the notes are on the fretboard.


I'm a semi-noob and I hear many variations of this but I am unsure of what it means.

Buy notes, do you mean name (A,B,C etc.) or name and position on the music staff? Or do you mean how to site read music in a position on the neck? All of the above?

Many people say once they learned the notes on the fret board their playing took off. Do they mean if they randomly dropped a finger in the middle of the neck, they'd know the name of the note they hit and where it sat on the music staff?
#9
You don't necessarily need to know standard musical notation, but you need to know what notes each fret corresponds to.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Quote by steven seagull
You don't necessarily need to know standard musical notation, but you need to know what notes each fret corresponds to.


For playing in a key?

Care to give an example? Thanks for the input.
#11
You just need to know it for learning to play the guitar, there's no specific examples...it applies for whatever you're playing or learning.
Actually called Mark!

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#12
Quote by steven seagull
You just need to know it for learning to play the guitar, there's no specific examples...it applies for whatever you're playing or learning.


Okay, thanks for you help. In my own case, I played saxophone for nine years so I'm quite familar with reading music etc. But many times I read "Learning the Fretboard" as one of the many checkboxes for learning guitar. In the course of lessons that I took over 10 years ago, I learned the notes of first position. I can site read and play notes in the first position and I had started to learn notes in the fifth position in the same way. So my question is, when people say "Learn the Fretboard" are they sitting down with a chart and music staff and going "today I'm going to learn all the notes on the sixth string." Or is more along the lines of picking up the notes as they play in position?
#13
If you know music then you'll know that there's just 12 notes including sharps and flats, and that once you get to an octave you just start again...so if you know the first 12 notes then you know them all.
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#14
Yes I understand that. But if I were to pick out a random string / fret location, say third string, 7th fret I could start with G and count seven steps to get D, but I wouldn't know it when my finger actually fretted the note. In other words, I can deduce where the notes are, but I haven't memorized where the notes are. So when people say "learn the fretboard" do they mean understanding it or commiting the note names/locations to memory?
#15
I for one have an ultimate goal of memorizing each and every note location by heart. I want to play lead so this should give me a step-up with improv (I hope). For now though, I am just learning the fretboard as I go along.

Listen to Steven. He is a wise and old hippy (lol). Just kidding! Steven is tops and he has been playing since I was 3 years old (1967). I have been watching him on here and all of his advice is golden. Now, if he could only make my head grow hair ???

(kidding Steven of course)

Chris
#16
RC, try downloading Fretboard Warrior. It's an awesome note learning tool. It makes you guess what note is sounding as you "play the game". Quite useful because you hear them, then attempt to input the right note. After a while, they come automatically.
#18
Quote by LeftyDave
RC, try downloading Fretboard Warrior. It's an awesome note learning tool. It makes you guess what note is sounding as you "play the game". Quite useful because you hear them, then attempt to input the right note. After a while, they come automatically.


Wow, I didn't know there was a game like this. I actually do the same thing in real life. Close my eyes, pluck random string and fret, and then I guess what it is. heheh

If someone tells my A string 6th fret, I can figure the note out. But it doesn't help when you are trying to learn songs by ear. Thanks!
#19
Ah, a resource for learning the fretboard. Just what I was looking for. Thanks.
#20
Quote by rhettro
Yes I understand that. But if I were to pick out a random string / fret location, say third string, 7th fret I could start with G and count seven steps to get D, but I wouldn't know it when my finger actually fretted the note. In other words, I can deduce where the notes are, but I haven't memorized where the notes are. So when people say "learn the fretboard" do they mean understanding it or commiting the note names/locations to memory?


The way I learned was I first learned to recognise octaves, once you learn to spot them then you're never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. The notes you tune by are also easy to recognise and remember ie 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the B. They're pretty much in the middle so that means you're never more than 3 frets away from a reference note.

Once you get to that point it's pretty easy to fill in the rest of the gaps yourself.
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#22
Quote by steven seagull
The way I learned was I first learned to recognise octaves, once you learn to spot them then you're never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. The notes you tune by are also easy to recognise and remember ie 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the B. They're pretty much in the middle so that means you're never more than 3 frets away from a reference note.

Once you get to that point it's pretty easy to fill in the rest of the gaps yourself.


This is good stuff! Now, if I can just do it quickly lol. Time and some study will fix that though <sigh>...

Chris
#23
Quote by RCShadow
This is good stuff! Now, if I can just do it quickly lol. Time and some study will fix that though <sigh>...

Chris

A lot of things on the guitar are a lot less complicated than they first appear, you just need to take a step back figure out the most efficient way to learn things....there are a lot of overlaps with the guitar so if you learn the right things in the right order you inadvertently find you've learned a whole load of other stuff.

It's like chords...if you learn your open chords properly it's an easy jump conceptually to barre chords as you know how they work. If you then get introduced to power chords you suddenly realise that there's nothing new to learn as you already know them, you just miss the top few notes off your barre chords. That's a whole lot easier than trying to figure out how to construct full chords on top of power chords.

Oh, and I was never much of a hippy...I'm more of a glam rocker
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#24
Well I too am a beginner and am concentrating on songs by Linkin Park. Numb, Given Up and What I've done are easy ones.
#25
just learn, i started out playing songs that i like and slowly learn chords like majors and barre chords and figure differents ways to play them. it just takes time while im not the best guitarist out there i just like to have fun
#26
Quote by steven seagull
...I'm more of a glam rocker


Ahhh...ok....my wife is a huge 80's hair band kinda girl. Some great bands during that time. I'm a mixture of 70's and 80's myself.

Thanks for indulging my warped sense of humor

Chris
#27
I've been known to channel Ace Frehley from time to time...

...just the guitar playing mind you, not the being a Nazi.
Actually called Mark!

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#29
Oh, and I was never much of a hippy...I'm more of a glam rocker


Nothing wrong with being a hippie, I've been one since around 1967 or so...and been playing guitar since 1960.

If you're just beginning, these guys are getting ahead of you, concentrate on open chords first. Those are the basis of everything else you'll do on guitar. Barre chords are essentially open chords with the bass notes added to them, so once you know the open chords it's a fairly easy jump to barre chords. As far as learning the fretboard, I still can't tell you what notes I play, and I'm a very good lead player, been playing lead for 30 years. I play by ear and just whatever feels right. Never practiced a scale in my life and don't plan to, I HATED practicing scales in school band (sax player too and learned every instrument in the band room). But I do know what chord I should be getting by what fret I'm on, you do need to know that much. Fret markers were put there for that reason.

Concentrate on open chords first, and learn to play a few songs you like, just the rhythym parts. Learn to strum, using both up and downstroke, and finger picking is nice sometimes. Later on if you want to get deeper into guitar then theory and learning every note on the fretboard may be worthwhile, but just starting out I think you're better off not getting too technical with it. Mark Knopfler is one of my favorite guitar players, I just found an interview with him a few days ago where he stated he doesn't know a thing about theory, or care, he plays by ear and feel. I don't think Clapton or Page had any theory when they started, nor did Ritchie Blackmore, Joe Walsh, Johnny Winter, BB King, probably most of the names you've heard for years, theory became a big thing much later on, those guys mostly learned without lessons or theory, play by ear and feel. Whatever sounds right. Same way I learned, I'm entirely self taught except that two uncles taught me the basic open chords and how to strum an acoustic, sing harmony and change chords pretty quick.

So don't make this too technical, go for open chords first, learn some songs, then try for barre chords, learn some songs using those, then once you can just play guitar without having to stop and painstakingly place your fingers for each chord, then maybe worry about theory, memorizing the fretboard, learning 2000 chords etc.

Right now just learn to play guitar...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#30
Quote by Paleo Pete
Nothing wrong with being a hippie, I've been one since around 1967 or so...and been playing guitar since 1960.

If you're just beginning, these guys are getting ahead of you, concentrate on open chords first. Those are the basis of everything else you'll do on guitar. Barre chords are essentially open chords with the bass notes added to them, so once you know the open chords it's a fairly easy jump to barre chords. As far as learning the fretboard, I still can't tell you what notes I play, and I'm a very good lead player, been playing lead for 30 years. I play by ear and just whatever feels right. Never practiced a scale in my life and don't plan to, I HATED practicing scales in school band (sax player too and learned every instrument in the band room). But I do know what chord I should be getting by what fret I'm on, you do need to know that much. Fret markers were put there for that reason.

Concentrate on open chords first, and learn to play a few songs you like, just the rhythym parts. Learn to strum, using both up and downstroke, and finger picking is nice sometimes. Later on if you want to get deeper into guitar then theory and learning every note on the fretboard may be worthwhile, but just starting out I think you're better off not getting too technical with it. Mark Knopfler is one of my favorite guitar players, I just found an interview with him a few days ago where he stated he doesn't know a thing about theory, or care, he plays by ear and feel. I don't think Clapton or Page had any theory when they started, nor did Ritchie Blackmore, Joe Walsh, Johnny Winter, BB King, probably most of the names you've heard for years, theory became a big thing much later on, those guys mostly learned without lessons or theory, play by ear and feel. Whatever sounds right. Same way I learned, I'm entirely self taught except that two uncles taught me the basic open chords and how to strum an acoustic, sing harmony and change chords pretty quick.

So don't make this too technical, go for open chords first, learn some songs, then try for barre chords, learn some songs using those, then once you can just play guitar without having to stop and painstakingly place your fingers for each chord, then maybe worry about theory, memorizing the fretboard, learning 2000 chords etc.

Right now just learn to play guitar...


amen..
#31
I'm pretty much feel the same way in all honesty, but learning the notes early on is easy enough to do and saves a lot of time in the long run. A lot of things are much easier if you just have that little bit extra knowledge...if somebody asks me to play a B chord then I can play it in about 15 different ways without thinking about it simply by knowing where to find a B root note, that's infintely prefereable to having to ask which fret to go to.

One thing I don't agree with is the "playing by feel" myth - nobody actually plays what "feels" good, they play what sounds good, and a little bit of theory goes a long way in taking the guesswork out of that. All the players that supposedly didn't know theory either know a lot more than they admit to or simply wasted a huge chunk of time discovering it for themselves when it's already been done.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Nov 5, 2007,
#32
Music theory, TAB, basic chords, scales, hammer ons, pull-offs, all the basic stuff. THEN learn some songs.
#33
Music theory, scales, hammer ons and pull offs are NOT basic stuff...and are not necessary for a beginner. Make it too much work, too much to memorize, too much to read and study and a beginner will lose interest in a hurry.

Basic open chords, how to tune a guitar, basic strumming, learn a few songs. That's all a beginner needs. Theory, scales, arpeggios, lead techniques all can wait until you actually know how to play a little.

KISS

Keep It Simple Stupid

One thing I don't agree with is the "playing by feel" myth - nobody actually plays what "feels" good, they play what sounds good


Tell me you don't tailor your playing to the "feel" of the song...metal speed picking for a country song? Blues slide on "Johnny B Goode"? Country twang on "Comfortably Numb"?

Tell me you're not playing what feels AND sounds right if you close your eyes and just let your fingers have their way. BB King will tell you every note should come from the bottom of your soul, whether it sounds "right" or not. Playing what you feel is why people spray painted "Clapton is God" on the London subway walls in the 60's. It's why Hendrix is still a major name and influence over 35 years after his death. Ditto for Duane Allman, any time you mention slide, his name comes up.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#35
Green Day and Blink 182 are easy as well.
A recent study shows that 92% of all teenagers have moved on to rap music.
Put this in your signature if you are one of the 8% who stayed with the real music.
#36
Quote by Paleo Pete
Music theory, scales, hammer ons and pull offs are NOT basic stuff...and are not necessary for a beginner. Make it too much work, too much to memorize, too much to read and study and a beginner will lose interest in a hurry.

Basic open chords, how to tune a guitar, basic strumming, learn a few songs. That's all a beginner needs. Theory, scales, arpeggios, lead techniques all can wait until you actually know how to play a little.

KISS

Keep It Simple Stupid


Tell me you don't tailor your playing to the "feel" of the song...metal speed picking for a country song? Blues slide on "Johnny B Goode"? Country twang on "Comfortably Numb"?

Tell me you're not playing what feels AND sounds right if you close your eyes and just let your fingers have their way. BB King will tell you every note should come from the bottom of your soul, whether it sounds "right" or not. Playing what you feel is why people spray painted "Clapton is God" on the London subway walls in the 60's. It's why Hendrix is still a major name and influence over 35 years after his death. Ditto for Duane Allman, any time you mention slide, his name comes up.


Feel influences my phrasing a lot, but not so much my choice of notes....that's depends far more on what's going to sound good, whether guided by my limited theory knowledge or blind luck. My instincts might nudge me one way or another, but without theory providing me with the map i'm screwed.
Actually called Mark!

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