#1
up til now, i thought that in walking bass (jazz mainly), the first and 3rd beats had to have a chord tone on them. but ive been reading john goldsby's book on jazz bass (meant to be very good), which has lots of examples of the styles of famous bass player styles, and a lot of times ive seen other notes on the 1st and 3rd beats. for example, a 6th and a major 7th, over normal maj chords. now im confused. what can or cant be played on those beats?
i need to get a better signature.
#2
Well, obviously no rules in music are hard and fast. And oftimes, when improvising over chords coming and going a mile a minute it's hard to place perfectly every time. Also a major 6th or 7th could potentially be in the chord.
#3
okay, but in both those cases it was over a 'major chord', as in a major triad. and i thought the maj 7 in that case would cause a lot of tension with the tonic.
i need to get a better signature.
#4
Anything can be played really. Jazz basslines tend to be more chromatic than arpegio. However, I think it should be a goal to cover the root at some point in the line. Maybe throw an eight note in there for the first beat of the measure, that goes from the 5th to the root? Just try to get a feel for the chord progression and spice it up as you go.

There are times when your lines should be more arpegiated. For instance if it was maybe you a drummer and a pianist soloing. Your line would be more concentrated on emphasizing the chord progression. However if another instrument has that part covered, you can throw just about anything in there.
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#5
No not at all. The Maj7 generally wouldn't add any tension. The b7 adds tension between itself and the 3rd. In jazz, almost every chord is turned into a seventh or extended chord of some kind. It's up to the discretion of the piano player usually, and the bass player hearing what he's doing and then adapting.
#6
Quote by MATTTHEMOP
okay, but in both those cases it was over a 'major chord', as in a major triad. and i thought the maj 7 in that case would cause a lot of tension with the tonic.



In jazz tension is often seen as a good thing as long as you resolve it. When walking the first notes to look at are the chord tones then a scale that might fit over a ii-V-I sequence or a chromatic line. You really can use anything. Just try it out and let your ears decide what works and what doesn't.
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#7
right, so i should aim to emphasise the chord tones, but if i dont it doesnt matter as long as i know why i dont, and what im doing? is there anything i should DEFINATELY avoid?

many thanks.
i need to get a better signature.
#8
Quote by MATTTHEMOP
right, so i should aim to emphasise the chord tones, but if i dont it doesnt matter as long as i know why i dont, and what im doing? is there anything i should DEFINATELY avoid?

many thanks.



Nope, apart from repeating yourself perhaps. Try and mix it up and give the walking line variety. There's no definite rules to music, it's all abotu what you think works and what you think doesn't.
Founder of Jaco society

[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#10
First note is generally the root, but after that, it's all up to you. It's generally a good idea to throw in some chordal tones, but there aren't any real rules.
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