#1
I was wondering, if I bought an analog mixer to record if that would be enough to record (knowing that ill need mics, cables and what not).

thnx for the advice.
B - MAN

My Main Rig:
☺1998 Gibson Les Paul Studio DC
☺Reverend Rocco(USA)
☺Martin DM
☺Peavey ValveKing 112
☺Dunlop Tortex(1.35Mm) Picks
☺Everly Rockers - .10guage.
☺Martin - .11guage.
☺Too many effects to list.
#2
a mixer alone is not enough to record.

analog mixers...and mostly the smaller ones...put all the inputs to a single stereo output which isn't great at all for recording because you want to keep tracks separate in the recording line so you can edit the levels later on.

you are looking for an interface like a Toneport for example.

Interface = recording/studio use
Mixers = live PA use
#3
thnx moody....you just put it clear for me
B - MAN

My Main Rig:
☺1998 Gibson Les Paul Studio DC
☺Reverend Rocco(USA)
☺Martin DM
☺Peavey ValveKing 112
☺Dunlop Tortex(1.35Mm) Picks
☺Everly Rockers - .10guage.
☺Martin - .11guage.
☺Too many effects to list.
#5
That is not true. A mixer is all you need to do a good, inexpensive stereo track recording via your sound card. You normally should only record one source at once, even drums you can balance multiple mics via the mixer to one stereo track. Latency can be a problem, depending how old your computer is. But old computers don't really like firewire and doing mulitple track recordings either. So you need a decent PC either way. I have made numerous recordings this way with an analog mixer.

A digital interface is certainly better. But its more expensive and so it depends on your budget. But if I had a band that played live and did not even have a decent mixer, I would spend my money first on a mixer to help with your overall live sound. Most mixers come in digital versions these days.

I now have a multi-track capable mixer that cost only $300, but I rarely record using more than one stereo track and don't use the firewire as its just a hassle to get fired up. I would only record a whole band at once with multi-track at once if the band was lazy to do it one at a tme and as a last resort. The quality this way is MUCH worse. No studio would ever do that unless they were recording the gratefull dead or a jam session.

I have some multitrack recordings made via single stereo track posted on my profile. I did not use firewire or USB for any of it.
#6
Quote by ozarkracer
That is not true. A mixer is all you need to do a good, inexpensive stereo track recording via your sound card. You normally should only record one source at once, even drums you can balance multiple mics via the mixer to one stereo track. Latency can be a problem, depending how old your computer is. But old computers don't really like firewire and doing mulitple track recordings either. So you need a decent PC either way. I have made numerous recordings this way with an analog mixer.

A digital interface is certainly better. But its more expensive and so it depends on your budget. But if I had a band that played live and did not even have a decent mixer, I would spend my money first on a mixer to help with your overall live sound. Most mixers come in digital versions these days.

I now have a multi-track capable mixer that cost only $300, but I rarely record using more than one stereo track and don't use the firewire as its just a hassle to get fired up. I would only record a whole band at once with multi-track at once if the band was lazy to do it one at a tme and as a last resort. The quality this way is MUCH worse. No studio would ever do that unless they were recording the gratefull dead or a jam session.

I have some multitrack recordings made via single stereo track posted on my profile. I did not use firewire or USB for any of it.

Ugh! Lets just say I am not surprised at all to hear that after listening to your covers. Wrong, wrong, wrong, and by posting your work you sort of validated that fact. Its not bad - it just sounds like it was recorded in the method you described.

Are you honestly trying to tell me that recording into the line in on a stock soundcard with a mixer will sound better than a Firewire interface? And please give examples of all the studios that NEVER record with an interface. You are going to have a very hard time finding any, if you are able to find any at all. I know of a few - but that is simply because they record directly to analog tape. I do not know of a single US or UK studio worth their salt that records into the line in on their sound card - thats ridiculous.
PM Me for any help you need with recording systems/tips
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#7
thrice, I am not trying to flame you. My stuff is not studio quality. But had I recorded using my firewire interface instead, it would have sounded almost exactly the same as I have compared them and examined the waveforms. So most of the sound you don't like, is really the lower end digital effects used both in the mixer and SW, its not really where the A-D conversion is going on. My budget dictated that and the quality is OK for my purpose.

As I am sure you know it takes a lot of other factors and time to produce a studio quality recording and I would never use a sound card line input in that case. But what I have done is to demonstrate you can get a good recording for very little expense, which is a very good start for most people here just trying to understand the basics and $100 is a lot money to many of them.

You just said you can't do it and that is absolutely wrong.
#8
What exactly is it that you think a mixer is doing for you audio? Why is it that you think it enhances the more so than plugging straight into your soundcard? I came come up with a difference, but I want to hear yours. Also if the AD/DA conversion of your stock soundcard is just as good (or as bad as the case may be) as your firewire interface then your interface has absolutely horrid conversion.

The point is that at around $100 you can a Toneport which has preamps, far superior conversion to a so stock soundcard, and allows you to record each input to a separate track, which makes it an infinitely better option for someone starting out with a home studio.
PM Me for any help you need with recording systems/tips
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#9
Okay, good, or decent quality is arbitrary. They mean nothing, because what I consider to be decent quality may be what others consider to be incredible quality, and what i consider to be bad quality others may find to be good. The thing is if you don't have a specific use for a mixer, for example you are using it as a part of a P.A, or for some reason you want to do your mix by hand with analog mixer, than by all means get one. But its not going to do anything to improve on your stock sound card if that is what you are hoping. The only reason I can see for using a mixer is to use it as a microphone preamp. But thats about it, I'm currently not aware of this special mixer function that everyone seems to think it offers when it comes to recording.