#1
So I know how to play them and I roughly know their names but I heard each one is like a different type of music. Ones Spanish, ones rock, ect. Can someone explain this in more detail for me?
Rhythm Harmony Melody
#3
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
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#4
could someone give me a tab of all the modes in the same key?
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#5
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#6
modes are over exaggerated by guitar players.

they are good to know, but it's more important to know your inversions and arrpeggios, in order to outline the chords.

thats mainly what jazz is built around, not modal playing.
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"Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible."
#7
Quote by rich2k4
modes are over exaggerated by guitar players.

they are good to know, but it's more important to know your inversions and arrpeggios, in order to outline the chords.

thats mainly what jazz is built around, not modal playing.
Nothing in musical theory is "over exaggerated." Without knowing modes fully (not just the shapes) you will not fully know what your playing. You might know the notes, but you will have no control over the feeling or the level of tension thats comming through.

Arpeggios are just a device thats occasionaly used during solo's and to back a melody as a change from using chords or riffs. Comparing which one is more important than the other is like comparing a marshall to a cup of coffee.

And do you even understand inversions and why they are used?
I have only seen piano players use inversions because it is easier for them to play chords like that. A piano player playing inversions can switch chords just so much faster this way. 9/10 times, inversions either don't sound different to non-inverted chord or can be described as a non-inverted chord with a different root.
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#8
Actually, I don't bother myself looking for all the moods from the modes all I do when making my solo is simply looking for the key, then chose my scale then play all its modes either in the keyboard or in the guitar, an whatever mode goes best along with the rythm is the mode that I will use...
#9
Quote by demonofthenight
Nothing in musical theory is "over exaggerated." Without knowing modes fully (not just the shapes) you will not fully know what your playing. You might know the notes, but you will have no control over the feeling or the level of tension thats comming through.

Arpeggios are just a device thats occasionaly used during solo's and to back a melody as a change from using chords or riffs. Comparing which one is more important than the other is like comparing a marshall to a cup of coffee.

And do you even understand inversions and why they are used?
I have only seen piano players use inversions because it is easier for them to play chords like that. A piano player playing inversions can switch chords just so much faster this way. 9/10 times, inversions either don't sound different to non-inverted chord or can be described as a non-inverted chord with a different root.


you can use your inversions and arrpeggios to create melodies. using chord tones.

if you are just going to use modes and solo within them, to me that starts to get a little bit like noodling.

if you have a chord progression like

Dm7- G7- Cmaj7

and you think of it as D Dorian - G Mixolydian - C Ionian. your're making things more complicated. simply look at all of that as C major, and use chord tones, your inversions, and your arpeggios to create your melodic lines over that.

atleast thats how i'd look at it
http://richmusic.dmusic.com

"Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible."
#10
^ I think it just depends on what you're going for, to each his own
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#11
another example. for Cmaj7 i can play a C major scale, i can also play a C Lydian scale.

but i dont like to look at it as a C lydian scale, i look at it, as playing in G major over Cmaj7

it's a lot easier to think of it that way.
http://richmusic.dmusic.com

"Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible."
#12
in my opinion modes are usless their uneeded theory almost lol u dont need them and they often make ur music to reliant to formulated
#13
^ How does it make it too formulated. If anything, it helps me find an easier way to get the sound that I want.
#14
Quote by natedapunk
in my opinion modes are usless their uneeded theory almost lol u dont need them and they often make ur music to reliant to formulated

Spot the guy that doesn't know any theory....
Actually called Mark!

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#15
Quote by Ænimus Prime
to each his own


indeed.

honestly its good to know how to do things musically in more ways than one..

what i still dont get is that there are two different "types" of modes...

like Dorian in C is different than Dorian on D (though they both start on D??)

my theory teach said something about it the other day and then was like "but thats covered next semester"

jerk
#16
to keep it very simple ...a mode is a rearranged scale...
think of it as your phone number shifted...

555-1234...if you shift the first number to the end..
you might call any other state in america..
but its the same numbers...

555-1234
551-2345
512-3455 etc....

the reason the modes are associated with different types
of music is because they create sounds that some regions
of the world use.

middle eastern music-------->phrygian (probably the most recognizable)

you can use some japanese scales or modes to create a samurai
type vibe. the themes from samurai and kung fu movies

if you learn your modes..or at least become familiar with them they
can take your musical compositions in totally different directions.

sometimes a pentatonic is fine..others you might wanna use an aeolian.

Music is like language and there are standards for different regions of the world.
some cultures use 3 strings. Some used or use 4.
Some cultures may use pipes or flutes . This would affect the notes that they played
as well. This is what helped make the cultures of the world shape distinctive sounds.

depending on what kind of style you play. such as fingerstyle...a different mode may
make your fingering the most economical.
standard Eadgbe--> from what i read ..is supposed to be the most efficient way to play
the major scale. thats one of the thigns that shapes the eastern 6-string sound.

commercial music is creating a standard.
Metal sometimes uses different modes/scales from country.
the same way that genres shape sound ..is the same fashion (only smaller scale)
that different cultures have defined their own.

no mode is set in a particular sound. But only most associated with different cultures.
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Last edited by Washburnd Fretz at Nov 5, 2007,