#1
I'm learning musical notation, And I don't when I'm supposed to write a note upside down or standing up? Does it even matter?
#2
for piano music, an upside down note usually indicates to play it with your left hand. i donk know about anything else
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#3
It matters. There are five lines each staff, on the middle line the note can go up or down. If the note is below the middle line, if goes up, if above it goes down. Why? I can't answer that, I used to know..
#4
Quote by pollodiablo
for piano music, an upside down note usually indicates to play it with your left hand. i donk know about anything else

Incorrect. I've never heard that before, and I've played piano 7 years so I expect I should have.
#5
Quote by prunejuiceman74
It matters. There are five lines each staff, on the middle line the note can go up or down. If the note is below the middle line, if goes up, if above it goes down. Why? I can't answer that, I used to know..

It looks neater I suppose.
#6
Quote by pollodiablo
for piano music, an upside down note usually indicates to play it with your left hand. i donk know about anything else


100% wrong

its used in singing music more than anything... ive heard (from college prof)

what i learned was that you do it for 3-space C and up... and notes that are tied to that C or above
#7
Yeah, the stems point up if it's below the middle line, just so it looks neater.

However, if you have two different parts on the same staff (as you often do with four-part harmony) the lower voice will usually have the stem pointing down, so you can tell who's supposed to be singing (or playing) what.
#8
Quote by pollodiablo
for piano music, an upside down note usually indicates to play it with your left hand. i donk know about anything else

i think with the piano you play the bass line with your left hand and the treble with your right, when you read sheet music you can see the left hand music on the bottom and right hand music up the top
#9
im pretty sure if a run of quavers ect. joined notes, start on the b, then go up, eg, c d e, then the stems go down, while if the run goes down, then the stems go up, but otherwise yer, notes bellow b-stem goes up. notes above b-stem goes down.
#10
Quote by prunejuiceman74
It matters. There are five lines each staff, on the middle line the note can go up or down. If the note is below the middle line, if goes up, if above it goes down. Why? I can't answer that, I used to know..


+1 for sheet music with only one instrument per staff.

For 4 part voice leading on the grand staff, bass and alto are always pointing down, while tenor and soprano are always up.
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#11
Quote by pollodiablo
for piano music, an upside down note usually indicates to play it with your left hand. i donk know about anything else


Wrong, really wrong. The left hand is the 2nd line (1st is a G, 2nd an F)

Doesn't really matters but if you get a high E and you write it up you loose a lot of space that's why we write it downwards.
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#12
Quote by Lgndkllr777
+1 for sheet music with only one instrument per staff.

For 4 part voice leading on the grand staff, bass and alto are always pointing down, while tenor and soprano are always up.


Not true. I sing in many choirs all with 4 part, and not all of my music has the stems pointing down. Its wherever it sits compared to the D (think bass clef here, its the middle line). If its a D, it can go up or down. If its above the D, it will go down and if its below D, it will go up.
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#13
For one instrument, anything from the middle line down is up-stemmed. Everything else is down. But if you have runs that go through the middle line, you use the stem of the 'mode'. i.e., if most of the notes are below the middle line, use up stem. And don't forget that up-stems are on the left of the note and down stems ore on the right.

And about the piano; the right hand is above the left hand. The right hand has it's own staff usu. in treble clef, and the left hand has it's own staff usu. in bass clef. Though they will sometimes cross into each other depending on the notes. But the notation wouldn't be defined by stems (unless the two hands are close to each other), it would say L.H. when you're supposed to play left hand.
#14
Quote by justin_fraser
Not true. I sing in many choirs all with 4 part, and not all of my music has the stems pointing down. Its wherever it sits compared to the D (think bass clef here, its the middle line). If its a D, it can go up or down. If its above the D, it will go down and if its below D, it will go up.


Yeah, but you're probably just looking at your part on the staff, not multiple parts on the grand staff, like he said.

Maybe you should read more carefully before you start accusing people of not knowing what they're talking about.
#15
Quote by I floss daily
Yeah, but you're probably just looking at your part on the staff, not multiple parts on the grand staff, like he said.

Maybe you should read more carefully before you start accusing people of not knowing what they're talking about.


Ok, I was under the impression of having 4 different staffs. Now that I read your post over again, I understand where you are coming from with the grand staff.

In most cases with the grand staff yes, the bass and alto will point down and the tenor and soprano will point up. But like before, this is not always, as often times both the alto and soprano point up in the treble clef. It all depends, but I do see where you are coming from now. Sorry for the miscommunication.
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#16
Quote by justin_fraser
Ok, I was under the impression of having 4 different staffs. Now that I read your post over again, I understand where you are coming from with the grand staff.

In most cases with the grand staff yes, the bass and alto will point down and the tenor and soprano will point up. But like before, this is not always, as often times both the alto and soprano point up in the treble clef. It all depends, but I do see where you are coming from now. Sorry for the miscommunication.


It's alright. I didn't say anything about the grand staff in my post, because I'm a retard, but the guy that you quoted did.

And yeah, I think I said "usually."

I don't really see why both the alto and soprano would point up though, unless I guess they're far enough away from each other where one couldn't mix them up.
#17
Where there is one part in the music the stems point up if they are below or on the middle ledger line (B on the treble clef or D on the bass clef, for example). They point down if they are on or above the middle line. If they're on the middle, it doesn't matter which way, really.

Where there is more than one part to the music different voices are indicated by the way the stems point - the bass will normally point down, the treble up. This applies wherever the notes are written on the stave.
'Voices' here means different parts within the music - it can be singing voices (see below) or just polyphonic melodies played on guitar - ever hear a solo piece (especially classical) that sounded like more than one guitar playing?

For vocal scores, when written in short score, two parts will share a stave and will be indicated by the note stems pointing up.
Taking normal SATB (Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass) as an example;
Soprano and Alto share a treble clef. Soprano uses the note stems going up as it is a higher part overall - even when it may be briefly below the alto in the score. Alto uses stems going down.
Bass and Treble share a bass clef - Treble is higher, so the stems go up. Bass is lower, so the stems go down.

Quote by pollodiablo
for piano music, an upside down note usually indicates to play it with your left hand

He's not as wrong as some people would have you think - if for some reason a composer has decided to write piano music on one stave (where normally it's written on two), they can indicate two voices, one for each hand, as described above.
#18
Quote by I floss daily
It's alright. I didn't say anything about the grand staff in my post, because I'm a retard, but the guy that you quoted did.

And yeah, I think I said "usually."

I don't really see why both the alto and soprano would point up though, unless I guess they're far enough away from each other where one couldn't mix them up.


What Ive seen in choir class is the sop and alto lines are just moving in thirds/sixths (whatever you want to call it) and they would both point up. What I mean is that the alto would start on a C, sops on E and then move up from there, often times both the flags would point up.

For the guy above me, wiki much
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


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