#1
Firstly, is this the right second? Because I am sorry if it's not.Okay well, i've been playing guitar for .. this is my second day . So, can somebody explain to me in full detail, what a chord is? I only understand frets and picking and tabs and stuff, so I want to know what a chord is, because they are VERY important - I err, think.

I got this chord from The Basics Part 1 Lesson:

v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v
A | D | G | D ||

And I am wondering what it means/how to play it. I know that v is a downstroke and vice-versia. Thanks for your help.
Guitars:
-Marquez MD-200 Cutaway Steel String Acoustic
-Some cheap electric guitar
#2
a chord is just 2 or more notes played at the same time. for that tab, you would strum the A twice, same with the D and G and the last D you would play 10 times, but going by normal music, you should prabably play it 8 times then got back to the start, but yeah, thats what it says i think.someone correct me if im wrong.
Quote by NGD1313
I cen lyk spel reel gud. I came n 2nd n da spelling b, sum dumb 4en kid beet meh.
#3
Well... actually a chord is three or more notes played at once. you might notice that the A or D or G chord you learned how to finger actually shows more than three notes at once. this is just because some of the notes are being doubled. a chord is a series of notes taken from a scale, in this case, they are all taken from the major scale. normally it will be the 1st degree o the scale, the 3rd degree, and the 5th degree of that scale. so if it's a C major scale (C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C) then the C major chord built from this scale are simply the 1st, 3rd, and 5th of that scale (C,E,G played simultaneously)
#4
I think its four strums each, it just got messed up.

A chord is THREE or more notes played at the same time.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
barre chords are easy as you can just move them.
if you can read this, this is the barre chords for the progression you have written.
d---7----12---5---12---|
a---7----12---5---12---|
e---5----10---3---10---| the v symbols just mean all the shords are downstrokes (pick goes downwards.

i think what its trying to teach you here is open chords. i can type tab them if you want but they are probally else where in lesson you are reading.
#6
^ Those are power chords, which technically arent chords at all.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#7
kw!nton: i dont get you.
Guitars:
-Marquez MD-200 Cutaway Steel String Acoustic
-Some cheap electric guitar
#8
okay, i am now gonna go back to reading forums and restrain from trying to help.
#9
I was just correcting you because you were wrong and it would confuse Newtoguitar. I have no problem with you trying to help.

Newtoguitar, have you seen the chord diagrams for the chords it says to play?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#11
a chord is a seiries of notes togeather
Quote by notsojoeyb4eva
Prove to her you won't shoot any real prostitutes. Bring one back, and show your mum how curteous and polite you can be with them.
#12
v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v
G G G G | Em E E E| D D D D | C C C C ||

So how would I do the Em?
Guitars:
-Marquez MD-200 Cutaway Steel String Acoustic
-Some cheap electric guitar
#13
Em is:

E---0
B---0
G---0
D---2
A---2
E---0

while E major is:

E---0
B---0
G---1
D---2
A---2
E---0

... the 1 on the G string (which is G#) is the major third of the chord. if you flatten it (make it a minor third), you get Em.
#14
Flatten it (make it a minor third)? What you mean by that? Sorry.
Guitars:
-Marquez MD-200 Cutaway Steel String Acoustic
-Some cheap electric guitar
#15
flatten means to go backwards a semi tone.
a semitone is like,
a, a#, b, c, c#, d, d#, e, f, f#, g, g#, a. that is going up in semi tones,

sooooo....
g# flattened goes back to the G.

and if you flattened the g it would be a f#
and so on.
#16
Quote by Ænimus Prime
A chord is THREE or more notes played at the same time.



Three or more distinct notes, is more accurate, using your definition a repeated octave in a power chord would make it a true chord.
Founder of Jaco society

[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#17
Well techincally a chord in its basic form is two or more notes.

A triad is a chord with three.

But it all goes by whether or not you consider power chords as chords or not.
Quote by Ylasto
R.I.P Ean.

Are there any other members of Lynyrd Skynyrd who are dead?
#18
ok, the diagrams you are posting are useless to read from.
you can post things like that using the -
thingy.

[code]v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v
G G G G | Em E E E| D D D D | C C C C [/code]
or look here for the original.
[url]http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/the_basics_part_1.html[/url]
#19
Quote by Lgndkllr777
Well techincally a chord in its basic form is two or more notes.



That is wrong, a chord has 3 or more different notes played simultaneously. 2 notes together is just a dyad or an interval.
Founder of Jaco society

[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#20
Theory crash course:

There are 12 notes (in Western music):
A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G#

Where the # - symbol is pronounced 'sharp' and means "plus half a note" (notice that there are no notes between B-C and E-F). You could also write those names like so:

A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab

Where the b - symbol is pronounced 'flat' and means "minus half a note". So basically, A# and Bb is the same note (it's called enharmonic).

Now when you play a certain song, you almost never play with all 12 notes, you pick 7 out of the 12 notes. The notes you choose are determined by the 'key' you play in. I'm not going into this, you'll find plenty on theory on key in this forums.

Now let's pick the key of C major, wich is easy since it contains none of the 'sharp' or 'flat' notes, these are the notes in C major:

C D E F G A B

When you take the 1st, 3rd and 5th note of this C major scale (C, E and G) you get the C major chord. Now when you take the 2nd, 4th and 6th note (D, F and A) you get another chord, namely D minor.

Now you ask yourself why is the first chord called major, and the second called minor? You get the answer by counting all the notes between chord notes. For the C major chord the distance between C and E is 5 half notes:
C C# D D# E
Now for the D minor this distance (between D and F) is only 4 half notes:
D D# E F

This is the difference between major and minor chords: the distance between it's first two notes. This 'distance' is called an interval. In major chord this interval is a 'major third', in a minor chord this is a 'minor third'.

All this to explain you what they mean by 'flattening the third to make a chord minor': when take a major chord and lower it's second note (which is the third note of the scale) half a step, you get a minor chord.

I'm pretty sure I confused you even more by all this
#21
Quote by branny1982
ok, the diagrams you are posting are useless to read from.
you can post things like that using the -
thingy.

[code]v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v
G G G G | Em E E E| D D D D | C C C C [/code]
or look here for the original.
[url]http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/the_basics_part_1.html[/url]


Thanks.

And for everyone else, thanks as well. But i'm sorta having trouble understanding all this stuff your saying, so I'll just ask my mate - he's sick with a guitar in his hands.
Guitars:
-Marquez MD-200 Cutaway Steel String Acoustic
-Some cheap electric guitar
#22
if this is only your second (maybe third) day of playing you might be confused by all the theory. My suggestion is just figure out how to play general chords first. Most people start with a G, C, D progression or something like it. Once you've learned the chords you can start learning scales. It will all come together pretty soon afterwards.

1.) Open position chords (The ones played at the lowest end of the neck)
2.) Barre chords (these are really cool once you get the hang of them)
3.) Scales and Theory

may not be the best way, but without a teacher or some prior musical background i feel it's more likely to keep you going