#1
So I saw someone in that "expanding my legato" topic say that Paul Gilbert spent the first nine or so years working on his legato, and that really helped his picking later on. Is that recommended? I haven't been improving much in my right hand, but my left hand is going great, so I wouldn't mind doing that. Infact I'd prefer it, but is it really a good idea?
#2
Yes. My Legato is on it's way I'm not great yet though
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#3
Personally I think that you should develop both your right hand technique and left hand technique to the same level. Actually, what seems to work for people that I help, is working on the technique they are good at for about 45 min. - 1 hr and then commiting at least 30 min. time to the technique they aren't strong on. So in your case, it would be working on legato for about an hour, and then 30 min.(even fifteen minutes is plenty of time) or more working on chromatic picking exercises, alt. picking exercises, etc.

as far as for the Paul Gilbert practicing only legato for 9 yrs, I wouldn't bet on that.

to me, its like learning to ride a bike. you can learn how to work the brakes all you want, but if you cant pedal, you aren't gonna go anywhere
If you can play music with enthusiasm and an honest effort, then no matter how flawed, noisy and unclean the music is, you are a musician. If you play just to be the best, you are not a musician, nor are you worthy of any musician's recognition. - me
#4
Quote by cm_richardson
Personally I think that you should develop both your right hand technique and left hand technique to the same level. Actually, what seems to work for people that I help, is working on the technique they are good at for about 45 min. - 1 hr and then commiting at least 30 min. time to the technique they aren't strong on. So in your case, it would be working on legato for about an hour, and then 30 min.(even fifteen minutes is plenty of time) or more working on chromatic picking exercises, alt. picking exercises, etc.

as far as for the Paul Gilbert practicing only legato for 9 yrs, I wouldn't bet on that.

to me, its like learning to ride a bike. you can learn how to work the brakes all you want, but if you cant pedal, you aren't gonna go anywhere


I doubt he literally meant that Paul Gilbert didnt do anything but Legato for 9 years haha. Probably means he practiced it a lot for that long
Quote by Last_Serenade
dimebag put as much emotion in to 9/10 of his solos as hitler showed when putting jews in syanide showers.

Quote by P-Laverty
QUESTION! Does emo porn have blood everywhere from wrist wounds?

Quote by Dabey
HAHA U IS TEH EMOZORZ

no but seriously, HAHA U IS TEH EMOZORZ
#5
Quote by Spamwise
So I saw someone in that "expanding my legato" topic say that Paul Gilbert spent the first nine or so years working on his legato, and that really helped his picking later on. Is that recommended? I haven't been improving much in my right hand, but my left hand is going great, so I wouldn't mind doing that. Infact I'd prefer it, but is it really a good idea?


when i started playing,
once i got decent at at alternate picking, i practiced a lot of legato
sweeps, economy picking, hammers and pulls and all that stuff

i got really good at legato but now im so used to using mostly legato that
my alternate picking is sort of off and now i have to spend time to fix it....

its a good idea to get really build up accuracy precision and speed, to a really high point in alt picking before you really go full out on legato


if i had a time machine i would have improved my alt picking more, but oh well..

it wont take long to fix it but its a pain in the arse

build up your picking hand strength/dexterity till it is equal to your left hand, or youll fall in to the same trap i did!
#6
Quote by Jdwannabe
I doubt he literally meant that Paul Gilbert didnt do anything but Legato for 9 years haha. Probably means he practiced it a lot for that long

I'm guessing it meant that his main focus technique wise was on legato. I've always thought that you should get both to the same level, but lately hard work and practice hasn't helped (as far as I know I have no technique problems) my right hand at all..
#7
sometimes what helps is taking a break, too. not from guitar completely of course, but try doing something different (maybe tapping?). and it could be that you are advancing your technique, but aren't noticing it because you are working hard to perfect the technique. Just remember to take it slow at first, and i would start doing alt. picking exercises first, using a metronome so your right hand gets used to the feeling of moving at every possible speed.

What I did when I was learning to pick, was take metronome and go from the slowest possible speed and go down from the 6th string all the way to the 1st and then back up (D U D strokes from 6th to 1st, and U D U strokes back to 6th. All quarter notes). then, after I was done with the first cycle, I increased the metronome one step up until I got to a speed I couldn't do. then i would go back one step and practice that speed for about 10 cycles.

As a plus, you get to see how you are progressing by looking at which speeds you can do now as opposed to which ones you could a week or two ago.
If you can play music with enthusiasm and an honest effort, then no matter how flawed, noisy and unclean the music is, you are a musician. If you play just to be the best, you are not a musician, nor are you worthy of any musician's recognition. - me
Last edited by cm_richardson at Nov 2, 2007,
#8
Quote by cm_richardson
sometimes what helps is taking a break, too. not from guitar completely of course, but try doing something different (maybe tapping?). and it could be that you are advancing your technique, but aren't noticing it because you are working hard to perfect the technique. Just remember to take it slow at first, and i would start doing alt. picking exercises first, using a metronome so your right hand gets used to the feeling of moving at every possible speed.

Yeah, I was thinking of taking a break from just alt picking and start working on legato, which is when I found that one person mention paul gilbert. Oh I definitely start slow and work up, but I always get to that point and can't get past it. I'm thinking it could be because I'm left handed and playing a righty guitar, but i'm probably wrong.