#1
if you buy a pack for a 12 string guitar, say (http://www.music123.com/Elixir-Nanoweb-Light-12-String-Acoustic-Guitar-Strings-101548-i1122735.Music123) for elixir's could you use it for a 6 string, twice?

doesnt a 12 string just have two of every string?
i really dont have any idae about 12 strings, but i though this was the case
it would save liek 3-4 bucks
but hey, its 3-4 bucks!
thanks!
Taylor 314CE
Modulus G2T and G3CT
3 Warmoth Guitars
2 Fender MIA Strats--SRV & JM
Alvarez w/ Modulus Neck and EMG DG-20s
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50 w/ 1960a cab
Breedlove AC250/SM12
Gold Tone Weissenborn
Adrenalinn III & FCB1010
ALOT of pedals
#2
Well. Logically... erm... probably... To be honest I'm not 100% sure but I don't see why not, unless 12 string strings are thinner. But that'd increase the pitch so... Yea.
Quote by Paul Lambeth

Is it lame to quote yourself in your sig?
#3
No, you can't. 12 string guitars are traditionally tuned with 6 strings at "normal" pitch and another set at an octave higher (except for the top B and E, which are simply tuned in unison). The string gauge is different for the octave-up set. What you CAN do is use the "regular" strings in a 12 string set for normal tuning and the octave up strings on another guitar for "nashville" tuning. This would give you a second guitar that can be used to layer guitar tones in the studio. Usually, this is only done with acoustic guitars, but the same concept would apply to electric.
#4
if you did use the 2nd set then the e a d and g strings would probably be too loose and just cause a lot of buzz and awkwardness, the b and high e would work though
Quote by Kutanmoogle
Now introducing Megabreth, Dave Mustaine's signature Tic-Tac!


Member of the ENGL Family

Gear:

Hamer Vector
OLP John Petrucci
ENGL Thunder 50
EHX Holy Grail
EHX Small Clone
EHX Big Muff USA
Boss DD-3
Vox V847
Korg Toneworks OD
#5
If you actually had a 12-string guitar with duplicate strings for each set, you wouldn't have the "12-string sound." You'd get a very muddy sounding 6-string sound.

The octave differences give the 12-string a depth of sound you can't get from an acoustic.

For what it's worth, if you ever pick up a 12-string, the neck feels like a 2x4 piece of lumber. 6 strings make a good amount of tension on the wood. 12 strings make a heck of a lot more.