#3
Why would you want to do that?
Assuming you have all stock pickups, it would make the neck pickup (or the pickup that is moved to the neck position) a bit hotter, and do the opposite to the one you put in the bridge. And unless you rewired the 5-way switch, the selector would be backwards.
#4
It'd sound worse than a squier would usually I'd guess.
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#5
It would be one of the more pointless projects that's happened in here for a while, that's what it'd be.


Disclaimer: You don't need to read this next bit if you don't want to. Although I guess it wasn't mandatory to read this and the first part, so whatever.
Pickups in guitars are all fundamentally the same from position to position. People often think that the physical position makes no difference and that the neck pickups are actually designed entirely differently, but it's mostly the position that makes the difference in tone. In old Strats and other vintage guitars, the pickups were identical in both positions. This made for a slightly louder neck position, but it's really not that bad. Nowadays the only difference is that the bridge pickup is wound slightly hotter to compensate for this.
#6
^Interesting.

TS, theres absolutley no point in swapping the pickups though. In a squier, i can bet that the 3 singlecoils are all wound the same.
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#8
Quote by XibanezedgeX
You would have a low output bridge pickup and a bright higher output neck pickup.
IF the bridge pickup is slightly overwound to compensate for the smaller amount of string movement near the bridge it will sound LESS bright.

It will be noticeably hotter and darker than the original neck pickup.

It sounds bright when used at the bridge, because the harmonics are stronger in relationship to the fundamental, in that location.
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#9
^yep. some physics wave lesson is needed in this thread.
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#10
Quote by cokeisbetter
It would be one of the more pointless projects that's happened in here for a while, that's what it'd be.


Disclaimer: You don't need to read this next bit if you don't want to. Although I guess it wasn't mandatory to read this and the first part, so whatever.
Pickups in guitars are all fundamentally the same from position to position. People often think that the physical position makes no difference and that the neck pickups are actually designed entirely differently, but it's mostly the position that makes the difference in tone. In old Strats and other vintage guitars, the pickups were identical in both positions. This made for a slightly louder neck position, but it's really not that bad. Nowadays the only difference is that the bridge pickup is wound slightly hotter to compensate for this.

Not necessarily . With stock pickups, yes, the'yre often the same, albeit with output differences. But aftermarket stuff....Anything goes. The Dimarzio Humbucker from Hell is a fairly bright neck pickup, and would probably be a monumentally bad idea in the bridge.