#1
If i am right there are 2 wires that lead to an output jack one is the negative and one is the positive.

am i right if the negative is the ground wire?

If so what is the point of connecting the ground to the bridge/strings/tremplate why not just direct them too the negative wire?.

why in strats the ground is connected to the trem and the output?

cheers
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#3
someone correct me if i'm wrong...but the ground is a part of the circuit where u can dump current if something goes wrong with ur connection. the trem and the output are both metal, so they can both conduct electricity. if there was no ground and there was a short circuit and the trem or output became charged, you would notice the next time you tried and do a whammy bar dive or plugged in ur guitar. but with the ground wire u are safe. i'm sure there are other reasons why there is a ground, but safety is one of them.
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#4
my guitar strings shock me on my upper arms when im just sitting with it reading tabs or w/e is that odd?
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#5
alright, i think i understand. but what would be the bets possible way to ground?
Quote by Gaz_m2k5
lol 50p means 50 pence you yank. And knickers are panties.

And over here our overweight is your average.



Fender Classic 50`s strat
Epiphone DR-200CE
Korg AX3000G
#6
Quote by aeon20k
my guitar strings shock me on my upper arms when im just sitting with it reading tabs or w/e is that odd?



very odd!!!!!

you should get that fixed. check that all ground wires are connected to the pots,trem claw.
Quote by Gaz_m2k5
lol 50p means 50 pence you yank. And knickers are panties.

And over here our overweight is your average.



Fender Classic 50`s strat
Epiphone DR-200CE
Korg AX3000G
#7
^Its not *that* odd. Its a loose ground wire. Happened several times to me before. Its not a huge electric shock anyway.
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#8
Quote by roast
^Its not *that* odd. Its a loose ground wire. Happened several times to me before. Its not a huge electric shock anyway.


makes ya jump but its just a light pinch no biggie im gonna get it all fixed up soon
a complete setup
Quote by Kensai
Girls don't have to do anything to be good in bed. If she's got a pulse she's automatically an 8.

#9
yeh its just a little pinch till you plug into a high powered system, then you would be dead as a doormat.... grounding is VERRY important, there has been many fatalities due to poor grounding, boath in the music world and evryday life... so make sure all your ground wires are soldered clean and in the right places!!!!
#10
lol... even "high power" systems use similar preamps, which connect directly to your guitar. aeon20k, do you use a vintage amp? The problem with older amps is that they use a 2 prong power plug. There is the possibility of the "ground" side of the instrument connection to actually be connected to the amp's high voltage "hot." Most modern amps, and older ones that have been converted to a truly grounded three prong power plug shouldn't have this problem.

Think of electricity as sort of like water. The "ground" connection should be essentially a bottomless pit into which the dumping of electrical power is limitless. This is never practically the case, but in decent circuits, effectively so. The "hot" side can be thought of as the pump. Valves (tubes) are called valves for exactly that reason. Think of a faucet or tap. A small amount of energy... you twisting the handle... controls a large amount of energy... the flow of water. So with your amp, your signal (a tiny trickle of current) controls a valve that moves a very large amount of current. This is basically how amplifiers make your guitar sound loud.

So anyway, to the people who have shock problems... your "ground" connections aren't a true ground, but a "working" ground, and I would have them checked out. They may not be lethal in normal situations, but if you play a gig in the rain, be careful!

The metal parts of your guitar are connected to ground to establish a reference point for the signal, as well as reduce noise by bleeding away any electromotive force interference (EMI) or "buzz". The buzz you hear is reduced when you touch it because guess what? You are another path to earth ground, bleeding away more noise.
Last edited by Losenger at Nov 3, 2007,
#11
do u have to ground string-thru string ferrules too? does that mean u'll need 6 separate wires?
Sincerely,
Shitstirrer
#12
^ The strings conduct too, and they're touching the bridge which is grounded, so probably not.
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