#1
As far as buffing goes, what do I use, and how do I do it? Do they sell buffing pads that attach to an random orb sander? How do I buff in odd shaped concave corners?

Also, I'm half way through (sort of) with the finish on this guitar. Ive filled the grain, shot 2 layers of sanding sealer, and 2 layers of gloss lacquer. I'd sanded the wood to 400-1000 initially, so there's like no pitting, just a super high gloss finish. I'd heard that you'd be done finishing after you achieve a high gloss, but is 2 layers of lacquer enough? I want it to be durable, but I dont want so many layers that it cracks in temp changes.

Thanks!
#3
They usually recommend the Rule of 3s:

1. Spray clear all over, then immediately follow with 2 more.
2. Wait til dry, wetsand with high grit, then 3 more passes of clear.
3. Repeat 2.
4. Repeat 1 to 3 for 2 more days.

That's a total of 27 coats.

Wait about a month until the clearcoat is fully cured. Then buff with 3M Finesse It II, available at car or boating shops.

See Algee's tutorial, post #2 --> https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=542726
#4
^ Is it just me or does that not make sense. I mean, rules 1-3 are almost the same, just with sanding in between, and the 4th rule makes it break the "rule of 3" title. Could you explain please? And also, I've heard/read that 4 days is plenty cure time, especially if you do 1 coat every 1-2 hours, 3x a day... is that not so?
#5
Quote by flashbandit
^ Is it just me or does that not make sense. I mean, rules 1-3 are almost the same, just with sanding in between, and the 4th rule makes it break the "rule of 3" title. Could you explain please? And also, I've heard/read that 4 days is plenty cure time, especially if you do 1 coat every 1-2 hours, 3x a day... is that not so?

Rule of 3s = 3 coats, 3 times a day, for 3 days = 27 coats.

Hope that made sense.

#6
Quote by flashbandit
As far as buffing goes, what do I use, and how do I do it? Do they sell buffing pads that attach to an random orb sander? How do I buff in odd shaped concave corners?

Also, I'm half way through (sort of) with the finish on this guitar. Ive filled the grain, shot 2 layers of sanding sealer, and 2 layers of gloss lacquer. I'd sanded the wood to 400-1000 initially, so there's like no pitting, just a super high gloss finish. I'd heard that you'd be done finishing after you achieve a high gloss, but is 2 layers of lacquer enough? I want it to be durable, but I dont want so many layers that it cracks in temp changes.

Thanks!
By hand. It's the only way. If you try to do it any other way, you will cut through the edges before you get the "deep" parts polished. Always avoid any edges COMPLETELY. Chances are, you'll polish them enough "accidentally". If you don't accidentally polish them, it will take almost no time and effort to finish them, after all else is polished.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#7
Quote by Ippon
Rule of 3s = 3 coats, 3 times a day, for 3 days = 27 coats.

Hope that made sense.




oh, thanks. But that brings up more questions. How long in between each of the 3 coats, and how long in between each of the 3 times a day?

And also, isn't 9 coats a day spraying way too much too fast? If I did a coat every 1.5 hrs, up to 3 per day, wouldn't that be safer, and also dry faster in the end?
#8
Quote by flashbandit
oh, thanks. But that brings up more questions. How long in between each of the 3 coats, and how long in between each of the 3 times a day?


Products differ; you may want to read the label. I have some clear that says...

"...apply coats in 15 minute intervals. If longer than 1 1/2 hours, wait 24 hours before re-applying."

and others that say...

"...if more than 1 hour passes between coats, wait 24 hours before..."

So it differs with what you are using .

Chris
#9
^ That is true, for best results, and when considering the lowest common denominator where the User is not savvy, the manufacturers will recommend steps that are on the conservative side.

It's easy to spray the body 3X in a row, 3X in a day. The key is to follow the recommendation to keep it at least 8" away, and not tend to overspray in the same area which results in build-up and longer drying times.

On my 3rd documented mod (Mod 3 below), I was able to put on so many layers of different colors and finish everything in a day and half; and so far, the finish has been close to bullet-proof.

So 3 clearcoats, one after the other, with one hour drying time, followed by another 3, then another 3, when done properly (without build-up or too thick a coat), can be done in a little bit over 3 hours, including the wetsanding.

#10
lppon...I agree whole heartedly...

Most of my expierience with finishing is with furnature but I am sure the same rules apply. I have a column in my home that I made of knotty-pine. It has no less than 60 coats of poly on it . I did these over a week period but used my LPHV spray gun. The finish looks like you could touch it and your hand would come back wet .

Chris
Attachments:
Column_Small.jpg
Last edited by RCShadow at Nov 3, 2007,
#11
I've kind of been listening to stewmacs finishing schedule, and the knowledge of an experienced wood worker. So I have a few coats that are very dry, should I start using the rule of 3 now? How long until the finish is dry after 3 days of spraying? And whats wrong with stewmacs schedule?
#12
^ Nothing really. I didn't strictly follow the Rule of 3s or the recommended wait time of a month or so before buffing/polishing. Heck I installed the hardware after a day and a half instead of a month and it's fine, so far.

As you go through the different steps, you'll instinctively correlate the weather/temperature with your spraying style and make a pretty decent guesstimate on when to do the next steps such as: Is it "dry" enough to wetsand? Or, maybe, I shouldn't press down so hard when wetsanding on the edges, or, the sandpaper is no longer wet, time to wet it some more, etc.

#13
One thing that has not yet been mentioned is this...if you have never tried finishing wood to the point of what guitars are (I mean the shine and such), I would HIGHLY recommend that you practice on something not as near-and-dear to you as your axe.

I make DIY speakers and one time tried to put a gloss black piano shine on a pair. IT'S TOUGH to get all the imperfactions out and get a decent finish like that. Just getting a nice even shine with any clearcoat can be a challenge, especially with darker colors so practice before you start on your pride and joy project .

Chris