#1
I have a Martin Grand Concert with steel strings, plenty of classical guitar music with tabs, and no fingerpicking experience other than stairway to heaven. I am knowledgeable of all the note on the fret board 0-24, playing with a pick, and common guitar technique- excluding fingerpicking.

I would like to start playing classical music finger picking (not with actual picks on my fingers, just flesh) and dont know where to start. If there are any good method books that dont explain each note and what an eight note is, that is what I am looking for.

please give any advice of which will help me learn fingerpicking style.

-brush
#2
well, if you really want to get into playing classical, you're going to have to get a classical guitar, because a lot of the techniques are a pain to do on steel strings. You can get a decent one for cheap, or hit up pawn shops, ebay, etc. As far as books, go, I would really suggest getting a teacher instead of trying to teach yourself, the process will go a lot faster. You might also want to grow out your nails on your picking hand, nails work much better than fingertips, as you don't have to "pop" the strings to get them to ring. It's like having your picks attached to your fingers. I'm also assuming you know how to read music because you asked for a book that didn't have the note names or values in it.

Hope I was able to help, let me know if you have anymore questions.
#3
grow out your nails on your fingering hand, it gives you a louder, brighter tone. i dont know any books but, just start with some basic easy songs and work you way up. ill try to give you a few example of songs you should learn not all classical, but fingerstyle.
you already know stairway
seether-broken
mason williams-classical gas
francisco tarrega-recuerdos de la alhambra
anything andy mckee or justin king.
i dont know many but if you work on these you should get the feel of it.
nice guitar btw, im trying to save up to get either a lowden or a larrivee.
also you should go to youtube and type in fingerstyle guitar lessons or something, im sure youll stumble across some good ones
#4
i just thought of a few more things. find a style your comfortable with. i mean llike 3, 4, or 5 fingers. i play with all five, but a lot people are more comfortable using their piny as an anchor on the body of the guitar.
#5
get a teacher and a classical guitar. There are so many things that could go wrong with your technique. However if you are not concerned by correct technique or tone you can always buy any method book. google for it and see what you find. I will write a name for a book when i find it in the mess here.
to be continued..
#6
I second the teacher suggestion. Finding a classical teacher is probably the most important step you can do.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#7
Quote by RedSox_o4
grow out your nails on your fingering hand, it gives you a louder, brighter tone. i dont know any books but, just start with some basic easy songs and work you way up. ill try to give you a few example of songs you should learn not all classical, but fingerstyle.
you already know stairway
seether-broken
mason williams-classical gas
francisco tarrega-recuerdos de la alhambra
anything andy mckee or justin king.
i dont know many but if you work on these you should get the feel of it.
nice guitar btw, im trying to save up to get either a lowden or a larrivee.
also you should go to youtube and type in fingerstyle guitar lessons or something, im sure youll stumble across some good ones


Whatever you do, don't listen to him!

Recommending Recuerdos de Alhambra to someone that can't finger pick is like recommending Yngwie Malmsteen to someone that doesn't know how to alternate pick.

Andy Mckee? Not classical. Not easy.
Seether ... not classical.
Classical gas... hrmmm not a good one to start on either.

Threadstarted, get a teacher, ask him for books of studies. Carcassi, Carulli etc etc.
#8
k guys. I have a teacher, plays some classical, but not all. So far I can only play some easy songs partially such as:

-Hourglass by liquid tension experiment
-Air by Jean-Babtiste Lully
-Andante by Christoph Willibald Gluck

I would like to be able to play hungarian dance fingerpick style or fur elise. I dont think I need a classical guitar yet, since im not playing anything super hard or fast.
#9
" 1. The message you have entered is too short. Please lengthen your message to at least 2 characters."

I love myself, therefore I quote:


[quote="Tommy[fin"]]
Tarrega's "Etude in E minor" and "Lagrima" are good examples of pieces to get you introduced to modern classical guitar music.

Check out these links:

    You're on a good start when you can play it better than that old sack of shite of a man there AND remember that it is a walz, I've seen one video where some turd sandwich plays this lovely piece in 4/4



      I wish I had something bad to say about that latter douche's playing, but I don't.

      Learn to play these precisely, precisely, precisely, precisely, without errors, and con gusto, man

      Edit:
      Aww... how... ****!!
      How not to play "Lagrima"

      Someone commented that video : "Ahem..
      You look far better than you play :-)"
      That means the playing can't be too good.
      #10
      To learn classical, at least in the beginning, you really need to have a teacher. If you think about it, the classical guitar and its technique have been developed for over 200 years, passed down from teacher to student. It would be nearly imposible to learn on your own, at least very efficiently. Get a teacher, contact a local university or music store, and they can help your further.
      Michael Ferris
      ferrisguitar.com
      #11
      I started with a classical guitar and i used this book "Julio S. Sagreras First Guitar Lessons" which help me a lot to get my fingerpicking technique going and without a teacher at that time. Here's the link on amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Mel-Julio-Sagreras-Guitar-Lessons/dp/0786627239/ref=pd_bxgy_b_text_b/102-5813234-7543364

      Here in Venezuela, where the mayority play the classical guitar and fingerpicked, this book is always recommended for beginner guitarist.
      Besides being a guitar player, I'm a big fan of the guitar. I love that damn instrument. Steve Vai

      Gear:
      Kramer Striker FR422SM
      Roland Microcube
      Digitech Bad Monkey
      Dunlop Tortex 1.14mm picks


      MY VIDEOS
      #12
      Quote by michaelferris
      To learn classical, at least in the beginning, you really need to have a teacher. If you think about it, the classical guitar and its technique have been developed for over 200 years, passed down from teacher to student. It would be nearly imposible to learn on your own, at least very efficiently. Get a teacher, contact a local university or music store, and they can help your further.


      I kinda disagree...

      Teachers are good for your playing, but not necessary to learn, enjoy and get skilled at fingerpicking. Or anything in that matter. Of course you probably learn faster with a good teacher, but not by any means necessary. You can get there by just finding the stuff out yourself and working your ass off.

      My point being; There's no right way to get started There is no ultimate truth. Do what you feel good doing.
      Last edited by Tommy[fin] at Nov 5, 2007,
      #13
      "I dont think I need a classical guitar yet, since im not playing anything super hard or fast."

      If you want to play classical guitar you need a classical guitar, sorry. It is a totally different instrument to a steel string. You also need a teacher to make sure you have the correct right and left hand technique. I had classical lessons for a few years before studying at the Birmingham Conservatoire, I had been playing electric for 6 years at this point and my teacher made me play right hand exercises for the first 2 months to break my bad habits, then left hand exercises to try and break my sloppy LH technique. RH technique is harder than you think to get correct.

      Also you need to shape your nails correctly in order to get the best tone on nylon strings. You play across the strings when you pluck at a slight angle so the nail needs to follow that angle in order to get smooth contact. Short on the left of the finger and longer on the right. You also need to file and buff them on a bit of soft leather or something to remove any sharp edges to get a pure tone. But a good teacher will correct you on any of these issues.

      Start simple, practice a lot and don't try and learn the Concerto de Aranjuez just work with studies from composers like Sor, Carulli and Carcassi to get your technique in order. Then move on to more contemporary composers as you get more comfortable like Barrios. Good luck!
      Last edited by guitarnoize at Nov 5, 2007,
      #14
      [quote="'Tommy[fin"]']I kinda disagree...

      Teachers are good for your playing, but not necessary to learn, enjoy and get skilled at fingerpicking. Or anything in that matter. Of course you probably learn faster with a good teacher, but not by any means necessary. You can get there by just finding the stuff out yourself and working your ass off.

      My point being; There's no right way to get started There is no ultimate truth. Do what you feel good doing.
      You're wrong. This subject is a study, just like anything else. Do you think accountants are self-taught? It's the same thing. Get a teacher, keep your nose to the books, study.
      Sincerely, Chad.
      Quote by LP Addict
      LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
      #15
      Hello Brush, to start with Michael Ferris is absolutely right; you could do with a teacher. From your description of what you know already do exactly that - ignore any other suggestions!

      You do need to understand notation, and ideally some nails, (not finger-picks - that's for finger-style - totally different)

      If you are serious about about classical guitar I suggest you join up to Delcamp. Just do a search, there's nothing wrong with this place but if you want some advice from people who play classical - go there!

      Korma
      #16
      Aaron Sherers Classical method book 1 to start. It is a good beginning book.
      Michael Ferris
      ferrisguitar.com