#1
Basically I need one and know nothing about who or what makes a good capo. Can you guys help me out? Maybe some recomendations, I don't wanna spend a massive amount. I have a ibanez v70 if that helps. I know it's entry level but I don't play massive amounts of acoustic stuff yet but I want to get better at it.

Thanks for any help.
No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable


@gossage91
@overtimefitnessau
#2
A Kyser would be a good beginner capo. They are simple to use, look decent, and won't mess up the neck of the guitar or strings. I have an old Hamilton capo with a swing arm and a bodacious spring on it. It would actually kink the strings when I used it back in the day. No thanks. If you want to go for the gusto, pop for a G7th. Those are the caddilacs of capos, and are fully adjustable. Nice, but not necessary.
#3
I guess you are familiar with the basic construction of a capo and its function. The only thing that may be of a matter is the neck radius of the guitar. So when you go to the music shop basically all capos should be ok for your guitar. Ordinary capos cost about 5-6 dollars each, and "special" ones, designed to press only some of the strings (not all of them) are around 13-15 dollars.
#4
Get the G7th capo, its compact and built like a rock and looks sick aswell its abit more expensive but it'll last a life time for sure.
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#5
Quote by King85
Get the G7th capo, its compact and built like a rock and looks sick aswell its abit more expensive but it'll last a life time for sure.

Or, spend less and get the same lifetime and use out of a SHUBB capo. I've had a SHUBB capo that was passed down to me from when I first started playing guitar. Just last year the grey pad fell off, so I sent it in for repair. They repaired it, cleaned it, replaced the rivets, and for a dollar, replaced the sleeve. They even paid for postage, so all I did was send in dollar, and it works better than I've ever seen it. It's made of solid brass, and it's built like a rock. Honestly, you can't find a better deal. The screw adjusts the pressure so it works perfect on any part of the neck without pulling the strings out of tune.
Sincerely, Chad.
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LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#6
I've recently got a Kyser and I really recommend them.
Whatever you do, don't go for a plastic/material combination, 'cause they WILL break. Get a proper metal one.
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#7
I tried my uncle's Kyser capo. I wasn't impressed. I kept noticing my strings being pulled out of tune when I went past the 6th fret. And being that they're just about the same price as a SHUBB capo, the choice is clear on my end (~$14).
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#8
I'd say you'll be fine with a Kyser, Shubb, or Dunlop capo. I personally I own a Kyser and a Shubb and I really have no complaints with either. The Kyser and Dunlop are trigger styled capos, so they are a tiny bit quicker to take on and off and can be clamped to the headstock when not in use. On the other hand Shubb capos are of the screw type, so you can adjust the pressure and they have much lower profile. And btw, Chad, that's pretty awesome service, I have to give them props for supporting their product so well.

All 3 go for about ~12-15 dollars. Personally I like the Kyser most. Really tho, they all work as intended and should last for many years, so you should be content with any of the capos previously mentioned.
#9
I slightly prefer the Kyser over the Dunlop. The rubber stopper covers a smaller surface area and therefore results in greater pressure on the strings. I find that this reduces buzz.
Death to Ovation haters!
#10
I went for the gusto...G7th is really, really easy to use, fully-adjustable, doesn't get your strings out of tune, real sleek and won't block your hand when playing.

sexy, too.
#11
Thanks for all the help guys. I'll either be going with the SHUBB/Kyser or the G7th.
No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable


@gossage91
@overtimefitnessau
#12
Quote by Chad48309
I tried my uncle's Kyser capo. I wasn't impressed. I kept noticing my strings being pulled out of tune when I went past the 6th fret. And being that they're just about the same price as a SHUBB capo, the choice is clear on my end (~$14).



i have a kyser and like you said when i set it higher up on the neck it pulls the strings. its great set on the 1st thru 5th frets but anything higher and you'll run into some problems. overall tho im satisfied with it since i only play one song that high up (here comes the sun)
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Last edited by blindfaith87 at Nov 5, 2007,
#13
What kind of capo would best suit a nylon strung classical?

I used to have a kind of reinforced rubber band capo, looked like it was made by some 3rd-world country children that get their salary in sugar cubes. Of course it sucked.

Thanks.
#14
Quote by Myx4o
I guess you are familiar with the basic construction of a capo and its function. The only thing that may be of a matter is the neck radius of the guitar. So when you go to the music shop basically all capos should be ok for your guitar. Ordinary capos cost about 5-6 dollars each, and "special" ones, designed to press only some of the strings (not all of them) are around 13-15 dollars.

i don't know what kind of cheapo capos you've seen but in my experience, your basic capo is 13-16. they do have those ones that are a piece of fabric and a metal bar that are cheaper, but those are crap.

threadstarter... any basic kyser, shubb, dunlop, etc. capo should work just fine.
#16
I use dunlop trigger capos. Easy to use, just have to be a tad careful when putting them on otherwse you're good.
#17
What kind of capo would best suit a nylon strung classical?


Check the guitar neck, I think classical guitars usually are flat, no radius. If that's the case, any capo will work, same as with steel string acoustics, but you need a flat one without the radius.

I'm using this Dunlop capo, they make a stright one too but it's not listed on that site. I bought my first one around 20 years ago, had to replace the rubber pad a while back but it still works great. I just bought a new one last year as a stand by, I've had no trouble with mine at all.

Pulling strings out of tune is a universal prpoblem with capos, I've tried just about everything made and none kept the intonation perfect. That's why I still use my ancient Dunlop...Usually I just have to pull up on the G B and E strings and it will drop back into decent tuning.

And a note for those who don't know, the capo should be in the middle, between two frets, not on top of a fret and not too close to either fret. If you have buzzing problems, it's probably too close to a fret.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#18
Quote by Paleo Pete
And a note for those who don't know, the capo should be in the middle, between two frets, not on top of a fret and not too close to either fret. If you have buzzing problems, it's probably too close to a fret.

Wait a sec, Pete... are you telling me that Trace Bundy AND John Butler AND Andy McKee AND Tommy Emmanuel AND Antoine Dufour are all wrong?! Hmm....
Proud Owner of a 2006 Taylor 814 CE-Fall Limited Edition


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CASE CLOSED..
Last edited by crystalh at Nov 6, 2007,
#19
Quote by Paleo Pete
Check the guitar neck, I think classical guitars usually are flat, no radius. If that's the case, any capo will work, same as with steel string acoustics, but you need a flat one without the radius.

I'm using this Dunlop capo, they make a stright one too but it's not listed on that site. I bought my first one around 20 years ago, had to replace the rubber pad a while back but it still works great. I just bought a new one last year as a stand by, I've had no trouble with mine at all.

Pulling strings out of tune is a universal prpoblem with capos, I've tried just about everything made and none kept the intonation perfect. That's why I still use my ancient Dunlop...Usually I just have to pull up on the G B and E strings and it will drop back into decent tuning.

And a note for those who don't know, the capo should be in the middle, between two frets, not on top of a fret and not too close to either fret. If you have buzzing problems, it's probably too close to a fret.


Yes, you need a flat capo. Since you're working with nylon strings that can easily be pulled out of tune, I would buy a SHUBB one. You want to get the capo made for the job, and the ability to control pressure placed on strings is important. That, and a flat surface.

Also, don't listen to him on the topic of capo placement.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#20
Quote by Paleo Pete
And a note for those who don't know, the capo should be in the middle, between two frets, not on top of a fret and not too close to either fret. If you have buzzing problems, it's probably too close to a fret.

Placing the capo exactly between the two frets will actually normally pull the guitar a little out of tune. This, of course, depends on the guitar, but assuming your intonation is good to go, placing the capo here will pull the guitar out of tune.
#21
capos r like 50$ tops dont spend too much time deciding which brand is better if it works its good
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#22
Capos are definetly not 50$.....I got mine for 20 bucks and its a G7th capo....clip on with rubber pads so it wont ding up the strings...Very nice..very sturdy, no strings attached and its very user friendly. i highly recommend it for beginners-intermediates.
#23
this thread is definitely old as balls.

please stop bumping old threads people
#24
Quote by Chad48309
Or, spend less and get the same lifetime and use out of a SHUBB capo. I've had a SHUBB capo that was passed down to me from when I first started playing guitar. Just last year the grey pad fell off, so I sent it in for repair. They repaired it, cleaned it, replaced the rivets, and for a dollar, replaced the sleeve. They even paid for postage, so all I did was send in dollar, and it works better than I've ever seen it. It's made of solid brass, and it's built like a rock. Honestly, you can't find a better deal. The screw adjusts the pressure so it works perfect on any part of the neck without pulling the strings out of tune.


i would agree its a good long lasting cheap priced capo that will do the job ur looking for without losing much money plus most other capos have more than one spring to apply the pressure so its going to cost you more to buy more springs than you have too rather than just replacing 1 spring in a SHUBB capo
#25
Quote by snowboarder371
i would agree its a good long lasting cheap priced capo that will do the job ur looking for without losing much money plus most other capos have more than one spring to apply the pressure so its going to cost you more to buy more springs than you have too rather than just replacing 1 spring in a SHUBB capo

It's actually not a spring; it's a lever. That's why it's so sturdy.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#26
Quote by Chad48309
It's actually not a spring; it's a lever. That's why it's so sturdy.


but you wouldn't be able to have the lever work efficiently without the spring holding the pressure of the screw that slides into the groove of the lever. =]
#27
Quote by snowboarder371
but you wouldn't be able to have the lever work efficiently without the spring holding the pressure of the screw that slides into the groove of the lever. =]

It would be just fine without. The spring is there so that when it's loose, it doesn't have the tendency to wind out or in. The spring is very weak, actually. Mine didn't even have one for six years.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.