#1
in several clinic's i've been to, experienced guitar players have told us to listen to a broard spectrum of music to develop as a musician.

my question is, do they mean taking direct ideas from the music (eg rhyming patterns, rhythmic ideas) and putting them into our owns songs or are the reffering to it as a subconcious thing that appears in our playing?

either way i think it apply's.

anyone else have an opinion?
Last edited by Flea_Is_God at Nov 3, 2007,
#2
well after listening to a song i might say i liek that bit and then write something along the same lines, not ripping it off in a different key but just the general idea
#3
I think they mean by listening to other musicians, it gets you inspired to find your own style but like everyone else out there, you have to start somewhere. Borrowing certain chops from certain players is okay, a ton of people do it as it is. There is a point where you need to draw the line though.
#5
If you listen to 4 guitatists and they each contribute 25% to your style then you'll sound very derivative, if you listen to 50 guitartists and end up with each one contributing 2% to your style you'll be unique.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#6
^ i definately agree with this guy here. this is what he meant, try to listen to a wide variety of music. you'll start noticing stuff like diifferent elements of different genres (like you might notice in a heavy metal song a really funky or bluesy riff or a very reggae sound in a pop song)
#7
You do assimilate stuff as you go along, whether you mean to or not. Taking it to extremes, if you were learning guitar and only ever listened to one player then you couldn't help but try to play that way as it would be your only frame of reference...the scary thing is some poeple do that.

Even with a few influences they'll still be noticeable in your playing, particularly if you only listen to one genre of music. The best way to develop into a rounded (no, not Yngwie) guitarist is to listen to as much stuff as possible. You don't necessarily have to like it, but you should at least be able to appreciate it. There isn't a piece of guitar music in existence that doesn't have something to teach you.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#9
Quote by ibason
Even if it's what not to do.

Well, I wasn't actually thinking of Avenged Sevenfold, but now you mention it...
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#10
In listening to a wide variety of artists, you will hear any number of rhyming patterns. You'll develop an ear for what sounds good or natural and what sounds forced and develop personal preferences. Rhyming couplets can work as can an ABAB (or ABABCDCD) rhyme scheme. You will begin to develop an ear for when a rhyme scheme is carried too far. You will also begin to get a feel for where you fit into the musical spectrum in terms of your interests, what you feel at home performing and what you're good at writing. You will be exposed to new musical ideas that have the potential to spice up the style you favor. Sure, I-IV-V-I is good theory, but you'll hear examples of how stepping away from the norm works and examples of how it doesn't work, where parallel 4ths & 5ths work and where they're the no-no's theory classes harp on. Even if you don't have the vocabulary to say why something is good or bad, you'll be able to know it when you hear it, and the increased awareness will begin to show in your work. You will also be better able to hear the difference betwen influenced by and derivative of (the difference between if you like ABC, you'll prolly like 123 and good lord, another XYZ clone).
Brevity is the soul of lingerie.
-Dorothy Parker