#1
I'm finally understanding the fretboard as a whole now, it took 4 years but whatev. I've really got a hold on some keys, I'm just wondering if there are some keys that people just never play in because the only way I can learn a key is by just saying to myself ok play in D# or A or whatever then just playing on it for hours. The thing is it takes forever and I'm not sure if there are just some keys that people never use. Also my biggest wonder is about changing keys, I haven't come across it but I'm worried I'm missing something pretty important about changing keys midsong, as well as changing keys midjam. Will a proficient band like the chili peppers ever just change the key they are jamming in without saying so. I can keep in key just fine, throw in some notes that aren't in key once in a while if it fits and generally make up chords on the go. I'm just worried about missing some important part of playing that could make me a lot better. Advice? thoughts?
#2
All keys are used, but some are used more often than others. It's a good thing to practice playing in all the keys, but it's important that you're conscious about what notes you're playing, don't just learn the boxes.

Changing key can be nice way to take song in a new direction. One easy way to do it is to use the dominant chord of key you're going into as a transition. Let's say you're in D major and want to go to C major, you could use a G7 as a transition. There are of course much more sophisticated ways to do it, and you don't necessarily need any kind of transition, ut you get the idea.

Changing key in the middle of a jam is something the band should agree on first. Of course, if the band are tight enough, one member may start pulling the song in a new direction, and the others will follow.
#3
yeah, I was stuck in the pentatonic box for a year, one day I just sat myself down and made myself play in C until I knew every note on the fretboard. Now that I'm grasping theory the possibilities are profound.
#6
Yeah, a lot of doors open when you start learning theory, and it's very rewarding when things start to make sense. When learning different keys, it's a good idea to have a look at the circle of fifths, to learn the sharps and flats. I.e, G major is only one sharp away from C major (F#). D major has one more sharp (F#,C#), etc. Anyway, the intervals of each scale are always the same, regardless of key.
#7
Do yourself a big favour and understand where all the notes on the fretboard are.
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#8
Quote by 5/4
Try the key of E double flat.

Personal favorite.

The key of E double flat? Forgive me if I'm missing something, but the keys are

Neutral: C

Sharp: G D A E B F# C#

Flat: Bb Eb Ab Db Gb Cb

Shouldn't you call it the key of D?
#9
Quote by Muphin
Do yourself a big favour and understand where all the notes on the fretboard are.


I do, and I know the circle of fifths, as far as chords go I just make them up, usually only using 3 or 4 strings and I have no clue what to name them
#10
Quote by Spamwise
The key of E double flat? Forgive me if I'm missing something, but the keys are

Neutral: C

Sharp: G D A E B F# C#

Flat: Bb Eb Ab Db Gb Cb

Shouldn't you call it the key of D?


Twas a joke.
#12
well it wouldn't be the first time here i've seen someone say something dumb.