#1
So I've decided I want a Les Paul Standard. I don't know if I should get a normal Standard or a Premium Plus though. The Premium Plus is obviously just better all around, but the Standard is cheaper and has the option of the 60s slim neck. And it has the classic pickguard.
I am perfectly aware that I should play both instruments before making a decision, but I just want some input, maybe some information that will sway me one way or the other.
And yes, I do ultimately plan to purchase a Marshall stack, but that's a while from now.

Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell;
And, in the lowest deep, a lower deep
Still threatening to devour me opens wide,
To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heaven.



Bored? read these, or this
#2
'Obviously' the Premium Plus is better all round?
It's just another pointless stunt pulled by the almighty Gibson to attempt to get innocent buyers to spend hundreds more on something that really isn't better at all. If you can find any justification on spilling out more for abit of subtle 'bling', then go ahead. But after you make the buy, well, you'll find out the joy pleasure of hindsight.
The plain Standards will do you fine, although I still think the price is on the wrong side of the 2000.
Two things to keep in mind before buying Standards though - correct me if I'm wrong, but the pickguard is only installed on the plain Gold and Ebony finished Les Pauls. Of course, screwing one on yourself is an easy task so it shouldn't cause you problems.
Also if you are the conservative Les Paul fan, then you may find to your annoyance that Gibson have adopted a new chambering scheme for their 2007+ Les Pauls where they scooped out a good portion of the mahogany body for weight relief, which has stirred up quite an issue in the Les Paul community, and rightly so.

My ultimate advice would be 'try before you buy'. You may or may not have read or heard that Gibson's quality check is gone down under recently. And with my personal experiences, the speculation worryingly seems correct.
Whatever you're looking for, from tone to the flame quality on the maple, will vary vastly from each instrument. Spend good time in a authorized Gibson dealer to try out the most you can. I did exactly that and got myself a spectacular buy from something that could have gone horribly wrong.
#3
Well, thanks for the insightful, if humbling, advice. I hadn't heard about the chambering, which is a total drag. Who needs weight relief? Fat people?
I'm sorry, that was out of line.
What i meant by obviously better was that they have better pickups and shinier, flamier maple.
So basically your saying I should get a normal Standard, pre-2007, from my local authorized Les Paul dealership ( I was planning on getting it from Guitar Center anyway)?
I didn't want to go the used route, but it seems like if I want a quality, non-gutted LP for cheaper I may have to.

Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell;
And, in the lowest deep, a lower deep
Still threatening to devour me opens wide,
To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heaven.



Bored? read these, or this
#4
The funny thing is I reckon Gibson think they have honestly made the right choice in doing so. That says alot about the Gibson PR department.
I for one, am against the chambering process because afterall, your paying same money for less premium wood. If they did then atleast bring down the price. Common sense - something that Gibson has thrown right out the window recently.
I worry more about the impact the chambering would have on the sound though. Afterall, Les Pauls are known for their backbreaking weight and destructive tone and orgasmic sustain. I'm not too good with science, but I'm pretty sure sustain will be effected because, well, there's a big gaping hole in the wood.
Also I've heard numerous complaints that the new chambered Les Pauls rattle (?!). And apparently Gibson's cure for it is to spray glue through the input hole. Hardly a cure. It's no wonder the PRS camp is getting bigger.

And as for the 'Premium Plus' Standards, I don't even think they use better hardware. I'm pretty sure the pickups are the same Burstbuckers they fit on the normal production Standard.

Just know what you're paying for. It may be hard to believe but I am a huge Gibson fan, but I consider them a flawed gem. I know the problems they have can be considered minor, it would take them so little effort to get it right in the first place.
But if you find the 'one' for you, then you would treasure it for the rest of your life, I assure. Even if it means spending hours in the guitar store pissing off the staff, don't settle for crap. The kind of money you are spending is considered an investment, more than just a simple buy.

edit: the chambering applies for Studios and Classic as well so I hear.
#5
I feel honored to have such a knowledgeable Gibson enthusiast set me straight on this stuff. Seriously, I'm not being sarcastic or anything.
I completely agree with you about the chambering, you don't pay that much for a soldibody to get a semi-hollow; and how could it not detrimentally effect the sustain?
I may convert to Paul Reed Smith-ism as well, though I hope I can just find a decent Standard that's a year or two old at Guitar Center.
oh, and do you know if the quality crashes are effecting Epiphone models as well?

Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell;
And, in the lowest deep, a lower deep
Still threatening to devour me opens wide,
To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heaven.



Bored? read these, or this
#6
Epiphone has moved their factory from Korea to China. I'm guessing it's to cut down labour cost. Epiphone Les Pauls also have rearranged the composition of the body. Instead of the traditional mahogany back with carved maple top, Epiphone have now sandwiched a third species of wood in between the maple and mahogany - most probably maple or alder.
I do consider these factors as a notable 'quality crash'. But then again, everyone is entitled to their own views.
#7
So now I've lost all direction in life, my only solace is that Marshalls are still the greatest amps out there, so I'll still get one of those, and I can always buy a vintage LP if I have the money.
As for my next guitar, I don't know. Virtually anything would be an upgrade from my current BC Rich SOB, but I want a guitar that won't need to be replaced. PRS is looking pretty good right now, but they're even more expensive than a Les Paul unless I get an SE, which is essentially what an Epiphone is to a Gibson.
The quest goes on...

Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell;
And, in the lowest deep, a lower deep
Still threatening to devour me opens wide,
To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heaven.



Bored? read these, or this
#8
I would seriously recommend ebay; if you get one from someone who has lovingly taken care of it, you won't be disappointed.
#9
Quote by Hemani Co
Instead of the traditional mahogany back with carved maple top, Epiphone have now sandwiched a third species of wood in between the maple and mahogany - most probably maple or alder.

Wrong!!!

For 2007, the Epiphone Standards have gotten all Mahogany instead of the Alder/Mahog. Combo.
#10
Ah my mistake then. But the ones I saw in a guitar show this year were specified as three tier bodies. Not that I care much for Epiphone guitars. But I stand here corrected.
#12
why does almost everyone think gibson is better? then epi? serous if i were to easer the epi and gibson sign 50 bucks says u can't tell the difference >_> P.S EBAY BAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
#13
While all opinions are valued, if you just go badmouthing things for no reason, I can't give you any credence.
Fact: Epiphone is Gibson's lower-end line, and I personally can tell an Epi from a Gibson without brand names, signs or logos simply by looking at it.
Give me a reason to believe that Ebay is "BAD!!!!!!!", or go away.

Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell;
And, in the lowest deep, a lower deep
Still threatening to devour me opens wide,
To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heaven.



Bored? read these, or this