#1
Hey there UG-ers.

I've been playing guitar for nearly 2 years now, and I'm fairly average.

My favourite style of music is Rock and Blues. With influences like Led Zeppelin, Joe Bonamassa, SRV, Clapton, Hendrix, etc.

So I want to get into playing some good ol' blues. I'm tired of my generation being shredders and I like playing with soul, so blues seems to be the way to go for me.

So can you please suggests some basic blues songs to learn? Stuff that aren't difficult, but challenging enough?

Thanks in advance!
#2
Check out the first solo to Crossroads by Cream. Also Purple haze and Fire by Hendrix are fairly easy.
#4
If you want blues rock, this might not be the best forum, but is still all right, you might wanna try the classic rock forum.

For older blues, (delta + chicago) try Blind Willie McTell, Son House, Robert Johnson, Blind Willie Johnson(great slide player), Lightnin' Hopkins, Howlin' Wolf.
And for some newer stuff, The Soledad Brothers, Bob Dylan, and The David Viner Band.
#5
i would suggest learning how a 12 bar blues is played out, and then just learning the good old blues scale (if you dont already know it). Learning to improv and jam will help you to look at virtually any blues song and go "oh! I know whats going on here!"
"Blues is what you got when everything else is
gone." - J.Lansdowne
#6
Yeah I know the 12 bar blues. Have you got any examples for it?

Im currently learning scales etc, especially the blues one. As im fairly average, improvising is really difficult. I always end up tapping somehow!
#7
Quote by boreamor
Yeah I know the 12 bar blues. Have you got any examples for it?

Im currently learning scales etc, especially the blues one. As im fairly average, improvising is really difficult. I always end up tapping somehow!


haha well, blues and tapping generaly dont mix, but if you can make it work, go for it! but yea for example in the key of A, you play 1 bar on the I chord (A), 1 bar on the IV chord (D), and then 2 bars on the I chord (A). Then you play 2 bars on the IV chord (D), and 2 bars on the I chord (A). Then, play 1 bar on the V chord (E), 1 bar on the IV chord (D), and finally 2 bars on the I chord (A), and these 2 bars are where the turnaround occurs. Thats how a 12 bar blues works most of the time
"Blues is what you got when everything else is
gone." - J.Lansdowne
#8
The blues scale is a really versatile one for trad blues and blues-rock both - it's probably the most widely used scale in rock, and is more engaging than standard pentatonic. What distinguishes it is the use of the fourth, augmented fourth and fifth intervals in both the major and minor scales, with just the major sixth or major seventh differentiating them:


(examples in E)

[u]Major:[/u]
   R W+H   W   H   H   W   W+H
E--0-----3---5---6---7---9-----12

e-------------------------------------------0-
B---------------------------------------0-2---
G---------------------------------0-2-3-------
D------------------------------2--------------
A------------0---1---2---4--------------------
E--0-----3------------------------------------


[u]Minor[/u]
   R W+H   W   H   H   W    W
E--0-----3---5---6---7---10-12

e-----------------------------------------0-
B-------------------------------------0-3---
G-------------------------------0-2-3-------
D------------------------0---2--------------
A------------0---1---2----------------------
E--0-----3----------------------------------


Try a bit of modal improv over a standard twelve-bar rather than noodling over the chords - it'll really open up the blues for you expression-wise. And don't get too bogged down in tapping and other flashy playing - remember that this music is all about feeling.

Take it easy
~Ben
"Is it an ambulance? Is he Philip Larkin? So much power in so few words."
~The Observer

"A transcendant terrestris, a timeless behemoth, trapped like Sisyphus in the cyclical burden of his own genius."
~The Sun

"His a cant."
~The Independent
Last edited by mud at Nov 9, 2007,
#9
Quote by mud
The blues scale is a really versatile one for trad blues and blues-rock both - it's probably the most widely used scale in rock, and is more engaging than standard pentatonic. What distinguishes it is the use of the fourth, augmented fourth and fifth intervals in both the major and minor scales, with just the major sixth or major seventh differentiating them:


(examples in E)

[u]Major:[/u]
R W+H W H H W W+H
E--0-----3---5---6---7---9-----12

e-------------------------------------------0-
B---------------------------------------0-2---
G---------------------------------0-2-3-------
D------------------------------2--------------
A------------0---1---2---4--------------------
E--0-----3------------------------------------


[u]Minor[/u]
R W+H W H H W W
E--0-----3---5---6---7---9---12

e-----------------------------------------0-
B-------------------------------------0-3---
G-------------------------------0-2-3-------
D------------------------0---2--------------
A------------0---1---2----------------------
E--0-----3----------------------------------


Try a bit of modal improv over a standard twelve-bar rather than noodling over the chords - it'll really open up the blues for you expression-wise. And don't get too bogged down in tapping and other flashy playing - remember that this music is all about feeling.

Take it easy
~Ben


nice stuff man, really great advice
"Blues is what you got when everything else is
gone." - J.Lansdowne
#10
No worries - I made a very small mistake on the second bit, which I've now corrected
"Is it an ambulance? Is he Philip Larkin? So much power in so few words."
~The Observer

"A transcendant terrestris, a timeless behemoth, trapped like Sisyphus in the cyclical burden of his own genius."
~The Sun

"His a cant."
~The Independent
#11
Further to the stuff about blues scales earlier, I thought some basic 12-bar theory couldn't hurt:

(examples, again, in E)

Your traditional blues structure uses the I, IV, and V chords, in the key of E being


 E  A  B
-0--0-(2)-
-0--2--4--
-1--2--4--
-2--2--4--
-2--0--2--
-0--------


On a basic 12-bar blues in E, you'd play

  • 4 bars of E
  • Two bars of A, two bars of E
  • One bar of B, two bars of E and one last bar of B


A variation similar to the version GD_GC posted is

  • One bar of E, one bar of A, two bars of E
  • Two bars of A, two bars of E
  • Two bars of B, two bars of E


To spice up the basic 12-bar, you can throw in a couple of seventh chords:


 E7  B7
-0---2--
-3---0--
-1---2--
-2---1--
-2---2--
-0------


And then you get some nice transitions, for example

  • Three bars of E, 1 bar of E7
  • Two bars of A, two bars of E
  • One bar of B7, two bars of E and one bar of B7


And if you wanted to play in minor, you could substitute the root (I) chord for the minor and the IV chord for the 7th or minor, so you'd be playing Em, A7 and B7 or Em, Am and B7. You could even try throwing in a minor 7 and see how it works out:


 Em  Em7  Am   A7   Am7
-0----0----0----0----(3)-
-0----3----1----2-----1--
-0----0----2----0-----0--
-2----2----2----2-----2--
-2----2----0----0-----0--
-0----0-------------------


So muck about with those and see what works for you
"Is it an ambulance? Is he Philip Larkin? So much power in so few words."
~The Observer

"A transcendant terrestris, a timeless behemoth, trapped like Sisyphus in the cyclical burden of his own genius."
~The Sun

"His a cant."
~The Independent
Last edited by mud at Nov 10, 2007,
#13
listen to more blues. you'll pick up the style.

wade on the water is a very fun song to jam over.

Jack my swag
#14
I can't stress this: Backing tracks. I recently picked up some blues backing tracks and it really does help your sense of timing and what works/doesn't work.
"My hope still is to leave the world a little bit better for my having been here." Jim Henson

Godin LG P90 (Electric), Taylor 512 CE Short Scale and Takamine Jasmine (Acoustics), Cordoba CWE-S (Classical), Guitar Hero Controller (Awesome)
#15
Quote by oreopride
I can't stress this: Backing tracks. I recently picked up some blues backing tracks and it really does help your sense of timing and what works/doesn't work.

+1, totally agree w/ oreopride here
"Notes are expensive. . .use them wisely"-B.B. King

"It's been very important throughout my career that I've met all the guys I've copied, because at each stage they've said, 'Don't play like me, play like you."-Eric Clapton
#16
Quote by oreopride
I can't stress this: Backing tracks. I recently picked up some blues backing tracks and it really does help your sense of timing and what works/doesn't work.


where do you get them?
#17
Guitarcenter has this King of the Blues thing that has a lot of free backing tracks in many styles of blues.
"Blues is what you got when everything else is
gone." - J.Lansdowne
#18
I got a lot of great backing tracks from guitarbt.com.
When I started to learn to play the blues (I'm still learning...), jamming along to backing tracks helps a lot.
#20
Quote by GD_GC
Guitarcenter has this King of the Blues thing that has a lot of free backing tracks in many styles of blues.


Can you put up a link to those tracks. I tried to find them but couldn't. I am more and more interested in getting better at playing blues and enter the next duel.
Thanks!
#21
Quote by metallhead
Can you put up a link to those tracks. I tried to find them but couldn't. I am more and more interested in getting better at playing blues and enter the next duel.
Thanks!


This might the ones:

http://www.gckingoftheblues.com/static_content/view/backing_tracks.html
#23
best thread on UG..
and mud you did a awesome job and explaining things..

but how is I - IV - V E a & b

i havnt quite figured this all out

Blues scale in E
I is the root. E
II is the second note in the scale or no? G
III - A
IV - A#/Bb
V - B
VI - D
Last edited by tibs at Jan 6, 2008,