#1
I was thinking about buying a fretless guitar. Does anyone have any experiance with any. Got any suggestions/ comments / previous experiances with one?
#6
Quote by forsaknazrael
Good for achieving micro-tonal pitches

i like using slides for these.

edit: in the video... the guy looks like he has... a metal fretboard...

fretless have metal fretboards???????????
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Last edited by ECistheBest at Nov 4, 2007,
#11
Quote by ECistheBest
i like using slides for these.

edit: in the video... the guy looks like he has... a metal fretboard...

fretless have metal fretboards???????????



Of course the standard material would be wood, but it has a few downsides, like the fact that it wears out, even with flatwound strings, and some people feel like it doesn't sustain enough.

The guitar in the video has a glass fingerboard and the guy playing actually sells them.

There are fretless guitars with metal fingerboards (the Vigier Surfretter), which is in my opinion the best fretless guitar available (which explains why I have one on order )
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#12
its like a cello isnt it, much more precise in forms of tuning, if your finger goes a centimeter furthur than it should it can sound terrible, so you'll need a good ear for it!
#13
Quote by bikersbasin
its like a cello isnt it, much more precise in forms of tuning, if your finger goes a centimeter furthur than it should it can sound terrible, so you'll need a good ear for it!


A centimeter is already quite a huge leap. It's much more precise.

Fretless guitars have the tendency to kick even the most proficient guitarist's ass when they first pick them up.

Like with a cello, or any other fretless instrument for that matter, you can use vibrato to make up for the minor mistakes you make, but getting your intonation together is incredibly hard.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#15
Quote by Bonsaischaap
Of course the standard material would be wood, but it has a few downsides, like the fact that it wears out, even with flatwound strings, and some people feel like it doesn't sustain enough.

The guitar in the video has a glass fingerboard and the guy playing actually sells them.

There are fretless guitars with metal fingerboards (the Vigier Surfretter), which is in my opinion the best fretless guitar available (which explains why I have one on order )

I wish I was you. Or at least, I wish it was me that was getting a surfretter.
#16
Quote by black_box
I bet vibrato is much easier and better, chords must be a pain though.

Vibrato is the same and chords aren't too different.
Freless isn't really harder to play if you have a decent ear. Its just a different sound
I've developed a complex where everytime I hear a Lamb of God song, I burst out laughing

My 7 String V build
My Main Guitars:
Kramer Striker FR-2027SM 7 String
BC Rich Afterburner Warlock
Washburn Xb100 Bass
My Effect(s)/Misc:
Digitech RP350
#17
Quote by DagMX
Vibrato is the same and chords aren't too different.
Freless isn't really harder to play if you have a decent ear. Its just a different sound

But you can do much wider classical vibrato. And slide harmonics.
#18
Quote by kyrreca
I wish I was you. Or at least, I wish it was me that was getting a surfretter.


Well besides the Vigier my life isn't too bad, either

Quote by DagMX
Vibrato is the same and chords aren't too different.
Freless isn't really harder to play if you have a decent ear. Its just a different sound


Even with a good ear it's difficult, especially with chords.

Also, as pointed out above me, it's more than just a different sound.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#19
Quote by DagMX
Vibrato is the same and chords aren't too different.
Freless isn't really harder to play if you have a decent ear. Its just a different sound

vibrato on guitar is usually either bending the string or pushing down on the frets harder (especially with scalloped fretboard). With a fretless, you can roll your finger in either direction so you can make the vibrato go below the intended note (i.e., flat), instead of just higher.
#20
Quote by black_box
vibrato on guitar is usually either bending the string or pushing down on the frets harder (especially with scalloped fretboard). With a fretless, you can roll your finger in either direction so you can make the vibrato go below the intended note (i.e., flat), instead of just higher.

not to be pedantic, but thats different from a vibrato. Its a trill (sometimes called a tremolo, but they are different). a vibrato is pretty much just keeping the string vibrating and the aim is not to change the pitch.
I've developed a complex where everytime I hear a Lamb of God song, I burst out laughing

My 7 String V build
My Main Guitars:
Kramer Striker FR-2027SM 7 String
BC Rich Afterburner Warlock
Washburn Xb100 Bass
My Effect(s)/Misc:
Digitech RP350
#21
Quote by DagMX
not to be pedantic, but thats different from a vibrato. Its a trill (sometimes called a tremolo, but they are different). a vibrato is pretty much just keeping the string vibrating and the aim is not to change the pitch.


Quote by wikipedia
Vibrato is a musical effect, produced in singing and on musical instruments by a regular pulsating change of pitch, and is used to add expression and vocal-like qualities to instrumental music.

Vibtrato means fluctuation in pitch. Keeping the string vibrating is called sustain.
#22
Quote by kyrreca


Vibtrato means fluctuation in pitch. Keeping the string vibrating is called sustain.

thats a literal meaning. the purpose of a vibrato is to keep the string vibrating for sustain and the rapid change of pitch is very minute. hence the word vibrato.
I've developed a complex where everytime I hear a Lamb of God song, I burst out laughing

My 7 String V build
My Main Guitars:
Kramer Striker FR-2027SM 7 String
BC Rich Afterburner Warlock
Washburn Xb100 Bass
My Effect(s)/Misc:
Digitech RP350
#23
Quote by DagMX
thats a literal meaning. the purpose of a vibrato is to keep the string vibrating for sustain and the rapid change of pitch is very minute. hence the word vibrato.

The change of pitch can be more than a semitone, which I wouldn't call minute. Ever heard of "wide vibrato"? The purpose of vibrato is not to keep the string vibrating, it's to add character to a note.
#24
Quote by kyrreca
The change of pitch can be more than a semitone, which I wouldn't call minute. Ever heard of "wide vibrato"? The purpose of vibrato is not to keep the string vibrating, it's to add character to a note.

fair enough, but by that point its going into slides or bends And the purpose of vibrato is to keep the string moving as a result of which the sound is a little richer/varied.
I think the main thing is my deffinition of vibrato is a little more conserved because this is what I was taught while doing classical theory.
I've developed a complex where everytime I hear a Lamb of God song, I burst out laughing

My 7 String V build
My Main Guitars:
Kramer Striker FR-2027SM 7 String
BC Rich Afterburner Warlock
Washburn Xb100 Bass
My Effect(s)/Misc:
Digitech RP350
#25
I think the guy in Cheap Trick occasionally played a fretless guitar. I know fretless necks are widely used in the electric bass world and can be heard on all genres of music, but the fretless guitar is a friggin alien. I would be interested to see/hear more of this in commercial music.
#26
Quote by DagMX
fair enough, but by that point its going into slides or bends And the purpose of vibrato is to keep the string moving as a result of which the sound is a little richer/varied.
I think the main thing is my deffinition of vibrato is a little more conserved because this is what I was taught while doing classical theory.


Vibrato isn't to keep the string moving.

It originates from fretless classical instruments like the violin, where the bow can give you all the sustain you want.

The point behind it is to make up for some minor intonation problems. It's incredibly hard to hit a perfect note on a fretless instrument, so you can make up for it by moving you're finger back and forth a little (thus giving you horizontal vibrato).

On the guitar, however, horizontal vibrato is pointless and there are much less intonation issues, because of the frets. The reason why we still use it a lot is mainly to make up for small tuning problems associated with straight frets, for the sound and also as an intonation tool on bends. The sustain might improve a little, but with todays high gain amplifiers and high output pickups, it's not much of an issue.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#27
Quote by Bonsaischaap
Vibrato isn't to keep the string moving.

It originates from fretless classical instruments like the violin, where the bow can give you all the sustain you want.

The point behind it is to make up for some minor intonation problems. It's incredibly hard to hit a perfect note on a fretless instrument, so you can make up for it by moving you're finger back and forth a little (thus giving you horizontal vibrato).

On the guitar, however, horizontal vibrato is pointless and there are much less intonation issues, because of the frets. The reason why we still use it a lot is mainly to make up for small tuning problems associated with straight frets, for the sound and also as an intonation tool on bends. The sustain might improve a little, but with todays high gain amplifiers and high output pickups, it's not much of an issue.

I used to play violin and did classical theory. I know the bow can give you large amounts of sustain and the vibrato in that case was to add micro-tonal variations in the pitch. IN classical theory the deffinition of vibrato was given as 'to vibrate, to fluctuate'. and getting intonation wasn't really that hard to do. but then again, thats the deffinition of vibrato that I've learnt from doing the violin and i could have been taught wrong but in the grade exams i still got those right so idk...
I've developed a complex where everytime I hear a Lamb of God song, I burst out laughing

My 7 String V build
My Main Guitars:
Kramer Striker FR-2027SM 7 String
BC Rich Afterburner Warlock
Washburn Xb100 Bass
My Effect(s)/Misc:
Digitech RP350
#28
Quote by DagMX
not to be pedantic, but thats different from a vibrato. Its a trill (sometimes called a tremolo, but they are different). a vibrato is pretty much just keeping the string vibrating and the aim is not to change the pitch.

ok, i think we're just running into different teachings then, possibly from the differences between the guitar and a classical stringed instrument like the violin, etc. On the viola, I was taught that a trill was a fast "fluttering" between one note and the half-step above it (i.e., F natural to F#). So you would actually be using two fingers to play the two different notes and alternating as fast as you could.

The vibrato motion that I learned on the viola does nothing on a fretted guitar. There were no bends either. The string tension is too high, the tuning pegs couldnt handle it, and its just easier to slide.

Bonsaischaap, it just takes a lot of practice to hit the right notes on a fretless instrument. I think it adds warmth to the note more than it "hides" poor intonation, although hiding the intonation makes a lot of sense when you have a bunch of people playing the same note.