#1
I can do many things with the guitar, but I cant figure out what chords are being played in a song... I really want to be a able to do this, but it seems to be really hard for me... Single notes are easier, but chords or single notes being played in a chord form is just a nightmare...
Any tips?
#3
Learn what different chords sound like, then translate them to different positions around the fretboard. It takes a lot of theory to learn all the chords, but the main ones are a good place to start. Major, Minor, Major 7, Dominant 7, Augmented, Diminished are good to learn.
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#4
I'm a bass player but maybe you can use the same method I do to work out a song structure...

I find the first chord of a section, even if it doesn't match the bass line, by playing it over and over until I find the note...usually slide up the neck chromatically. The other chords are relative to this starting spot and become easier to locate.

Once you find that 'root' you can experiment with which voicing should be played...i.e. you know the chord is some form of 'A'. Try major, minor, A7, etc and your ears will tell you when you're close.
#5
Yup, just practice, you don't just work at getting your fingers to do stuff, you have to train your ears to listen differently too...and like anything else it takes time, it won't happen overnight.
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#6
also, is there a trick in remembering what chords are in what keys? I have the chart, but its kinda hard to get it all in correctly

anddd... should i bother about finding out the key of the song first? or the chords?
#8
if you know the key, working chords out is much easier.

If all the chords are diatonic (they only contain the notes in the key), if you figure out the key thats pretty much all the work done.

What i'd say is play a random chord, and figure if its higher or lower than that, and if theres any added notes - trial and error, and all that
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left in the cold,
I want to feel youre conscience making, a change to fix
this dying soul....
#9
so memorizing what chords are in what key seems to be useful... any tricks to that? or just plain memorizing
#10
learn the intervals between the notes in each key first.

so in major it would be "note I - 2 semitone step - note II - 2 semitone - note III - 1 semitone, etc..."

and then learn which chords are major and minor in each key.

"Chord I = major, Chord II = etc."

and you should end up knowing the spaces between each root note and the type of chord that it is.

I hope that made sense...
I want to feel youre body breaking, and shaking, and
left in the cold,
I want to feel youre conscience making, a change to fix
this dying soul....